Who sponsors Drupal development? (2018-2019 edition)

The past years, I've examined Drupal.org's contribution data to understand who develops Drupal, how diverse the Drupal community is, how much of Drupal's maintenance and innovation is sponsored, and where that sponsorship comes from.

You can look at the 2016 report, the 2017 report, and the 2018 report. Each report looks at data collected in the 12-month period between July 1st and June 30th.

This year's report shows that:

Both the recorded number of contributors and contributions have increased.
Most contributions are sponsored, but volunteer contributions remains very important to Drupal's success.
Drupal's maintenance and innovation depends mostly on smaller Drupal agencies and Acquia. Hosting companies, multi-platform digital marketing agencies, large system integrators and end users make fewer contributions to Drupal.
Drupal's contributors have become more diverse, but are still not diverse enough.
Methodology

What are Drupal.org issues?

"Issues" are pages on Drupal.org. Each issue tracks an idea, feature request, bug report, task, or more. See https://www.drupal.org/project/issues for the list of all issues.

For this report, we looked at all Drupal.org issues marked "closed" or "fixed" in the 12-month period from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019. The issues analyzed in this report span Drupal core and thousands of contributed projects, across all major versions of Drupal.

What are Drupal.org credits?

In the spring of 2015, after proposing initial ideas for giving credit, Drupal.org added the ability for people to attribute their work in the Drupal.org issues to an organization or customer, or mark it the result of volunteer efforts.

A screenshot of an issue comment on Drupal.org. You can see that jamadar worked on this patch as a volunteer, but also as part of his day job working for TATA Consultancy Services on behalf of their customer, Pfizer.
Drupal.org's credit system is truly unique and groundbreaking in Open Source and provides unprecedented insights into the inner workings of a large Open Source project. There are a few limitations with this approach, which we'll address at the end of this report.

What is the Drupal community working on?

In the 12-month period between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019, 27,522 issues were marked "closed" or "fixed", a 13% increase from the 24,447 issues in the 2017-2018 period.

In total, the Drupal community worked on 3,474 different Drupal.org projects this year compared to 3,229 projects in the 2017-2018 period — an 8% year over year increase.

The majority of the credits are the result of work on contributed modules:

Compared to the previous period, contribution credits increased across all project types:

The most notable change is the large jump in "non-product credits": more and more members in the community started tracking credits for non-product activities such as organizing Drupal events (e.g. DrupalCamp Delhi project, Drupal Developer Days, Drupal Europe and DrupalCon Europe), promoting Drupal (e.g. Drupal pitch deck or community working groups (e.g. Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Working Group, Governance Working Group).

While some of these increases reflect new contributions, others are existing contributions that are newly reported. All contributions are valuable, whether they're code contributions, or non-product and community-oriented contributions such as organizing events, giving talks, leading sprints, etc. The fact that the credit system is becoming more accurate in recognizing more types of Open Source contribution is both important and positive.

Who is working on Drupal?

For this report's time period, Drupal.org's credit system received contributions from 8,513 different individuals and 1,137 different organizations — a meaningful increase from last year's report.

Consistent with previous years, approximately 51% of the individual contributors received just one credit. Meanwhile, the top 30 contributors (the top 0.4%) account for 19% of the total credits. In other words, a relatively small number of individuals do the majority of the work. These individuals put an incredible amount of time and effort into developing Drupal and its contributed projects:

RankUsernameIssues1kiamlaluno16102jrockowitz7563alexpott6424RajabNatshah6165volkswagenchick5196bojanz5047alonaoneill4898thalles4889Wim Leers43710DamienMcKenna43111Berdir42412chipway35613larowlan32414pifagor32015catch31316mglaman27717adci_contributor27418quietone26619tim.plunkett26520gaurav.kapoor25321RenatoG24622heddn24323chr.fritsch24124xjm23825phenaproxima23826mkalkbrenner23527gvso23228dawehner21929e0ipso21830drumm205Out of the top 30 contributors featured this year, 28 were active contributors in the 2017-2018 period as well. These Drupalists' dedication and continued contribution to the project has been crucial to Drupal's development.

It's also important to recognize that most of the top 30 contributors are sponsored by an organization. Their sponsorship details are provided later in this article. We value the organizations that sponsor these remarkable individuals, because without their support, it could be more challenging for these individuals to be in the top 30.

It's also nice to see two new contributors make the top 30 this year — Alona O'neill with sponsorship from Hook 42 and Thalles Ferreira with sponsorship from CI&T. Most of their credits were the result of smaller patches (e.g. removing deprecated code, fixing coding style issues, etc) or in some cases non-product credits rather than new feature development or fixing complex bugs. These types of contributions are valuable and often a stepping stone towards towards more in-depth contribution.
How much of the work is sponsored?

Issue credits can be marked as "volunteer" and "sponsored" simultaneously (shown in jamadar's screenshot near the top of this post). This could be the case when a contributor does the necessary work to satisfy the customer's need, in addition to using their spare time to add extra functionality.

For those credits with attribution details, 18% were "purely volunteer" credits (8,433 credits), in stark contrast to the 65% that were "purely sponsored" (29,802 credits). While there are almost four times as many "purely sponsored" credits as "purely volunteer" credits, volunteer contribution remains very important to Drupal.

Both "purely volunteer" and "purely sponsored" credits grew — "purely sponsored" credits grew faster in absolute numbers, but for the first time in four years "purely volunteer" credits grew faster in relative numbers.

The large jump in volunteer credits can be explained by the community capturing more non-product contributions. As can be seen on the graph below, these non-product contributions are more volunteer-centric.

Who is sponsoring the work?

Now that we've established that the majority of contributions to Drupal are sponsored, let's study which organizations contribute to Drupal. While 1,137 different organizations contributed to Drupal, approximately 50% of them received four credits or less. The top 30 organizations (roughly the top 3%) account for approximately 25% of the total credits, which implies that the top 30 companies play a crucial role in the health of the Drupal project.

Top contributing organizations based on the number of issue credits.While not immediately obvious from the graph above, a variety of different types of companies are active in Drupal's ecosystem:

Category
Description
Traditional Drupal businesses
Small-to-medium-sized professional services companies that primarily make money using Drupal. They typically employ fewer than 100 employees, and because they specialize in Drupal, many of these professional services companies contribute frequently and are a huge part of our community. Examples are Hook42, Centarro, The Big Blue House, Vardot, etc.
Digital marketing agencies
Larger full-service agencies that have marketing-led practices using a variety of tools, typically including Drupal, Adobe Experience Manager, Sitecore, WordPress, etc. They tend to be larger, with many of the larger agencies employing thousands of people. Examples are Wunderman, Possible and Mirum.
System integrators
Larger companies that specialize in bringing together different technologies into one solution. Example system agencies are Accenture, TATA Consultancy Services, Capgemini and CI&T.
Hosting companies
Examples are Acquia, Rackspace, Pantheon and Platform.sh.
End users
Examples are Pfizer or bio.logis Genetic Information Management GmbH.
A few observations:

Almost all of the sponsors in the top 30 are traditional Drupal businesses with fewer than 50 employees. Only five companies in the top 30 — Pfizer, Google, CI&T, bio.logis and Acquia — are not traditional Drupal businesses. The traditional Drupal businesses are responsible for almost 80% of all the credits in the top 30. This percentage goes up if you extend beyond the top 30. It's fair to say that Drupal's maintenance and innovation largely depends on these traditional Drupal businesses.
The larger, multi-platform digital marketing agencies are barely contributing to Drupal. While more and more large digital agencies are building out Drupal practices, no digital marketing agencies show up in the top 30, and hardly any appear in the entire list of contributing organizations. While they are not required to contribute, I'm frustrated that we have not yet found the right way to communicate the value of contribution to these companies. We need to incentivize each of these firms to contribute back with the same commitment that we see from traditional Drupal businesses
The only system integrator in the top 30 is CI&T, which ranked 4th with 795 credits. As far as system integrators are concerned, CI&T is a smaller player with approximately 2,500 employees. However, we do see various system integrators outside of the top 30, including Globant, Capgemini, Sapient and TATA Consultancy Services. In the past year, Capgemini almost quadrupled their credits from 46 to 196, TATA doubled its credits from 85 to 194, Sapient doubled its credits from 28 to 65, and Globant kept more or less steady with 41 credits. Accenture and Wipro do not appear to contribute despite doing a fair amount of Drupal work in the field.
Hosting companies also play an important role in our community, yet only Acquia appears in the top 30. Rackspace has 68 credits, Pantheon has 43, and Platform.sh has 23. I looked for other hosting companies in the data, but couldn't find any. In general, there is a persistent problem with hosting companies that make a lot of money with Drupal not contributing back. The contribution gap between Acquia and other hosting companies has increased, not decreased.
We also saw three end users in the top 30 as corporate sponsors: Pfizer (453 credits), Thunder (659 credits, up from 432 credits the year before), and the German company, bio.logis (330 credits). A notable end user is Johnson & Johnson, who was just outside of the top 30, with 221 credits, up from 29 credits the year before. Other end users outside of the top 30, include the European Commission (189 credits), Workday (112 credits), Paypal (80 credits), NBCUniversal (48 credits), Wolters Kluwer (20 credits), and Burda Media (24 credits). We also saw contributions from many universities, including the University of British Columbia (148 credits), University of Waterloo (129 credits), Princeton University (73 credits), University of Austin Texas at Austin (57 credits), Charles Darwin University (24 credits), University of Edinburgh (23 credits), University of Minnesota (19 credits) and many more.

It would be interesting to see what would happen if more end users mandated contributions from their partners. Pfizer, for example, only works with agencies that contribute back to Drupal, and uses Drupal's credit system to verify their vendors' claims. The State of Georgia started doing the same; they also made Open Source contribution a vendor selection criteria. If more end users took this stance, it could have a big impact on the number of digital agencies, hosting companies and system integrators that contribute to Drupal.

While we should encourage more organizations to sponsor Drupal contributions, we should also understand and respect that some organizations can give more than others and that some might not be able to give back at all. Our goal is not to foster an environment that demands what and how others should give back. Instead, we need to help foster an environment worthy of contribution. This is clearly laid out in Drupal's Values and Principles.

How diverse is Drupal?

Supporting diversity and inclusion within Drupal is essential to the health and success of the project. The people who work on Drupal should reflect the diversity of people who use and work with the web.

I looked at both the gender and geographic diversity of Drupal.org contributors. While these are only two examples of diversity, these are the only diversity characteristics we currently have sufficient data for. Drupal.org recently rolled out support for Big 8/Big 10, so next year we should have more demographics information

Gender diversity

The data shows that only 8% of the recorded contributions were made by contributors who do not identify as male, which continues to indicate a wide gender gap. This is a one percent increase compared to last year. The gender imbalance in Drupal is profound and underscores the need to continue fostering diversity and inclusion in our community.

Last year I wrote a post called about the privilege of free time in Open Source. It made the case that Open Source is not a meritocracy, because not everyone has equal amounts of free time to contribute. For example, research shows that women still spend more than double the time as men doing unpaid domestic work, such as housework or childcare. This makes it more difficult for women to contribute to Open Source on an unpaid, volunteer basis. It's one of the reasons why Open Source projects suffer from a lack of diversity, among others including hostile environments and unconscious biases. Drupal.org's credit data unfortunately still shows a big gender disparity in contributions:

Ideally, over time, we can collect more data on non-binary gender designations, as well as segment some of the trends behind contributions by gender. We can also do better at collecting data on other systemic issues beyond gender alone. Knowing more about these trends can help us close existing gaps. In the meantime, organizations capable of giving back should consider financially sponsoring individuals from underrepresented groups to contribute to Open Source. Each of us needs to decide if and how we can help give time and opportunities to underrepresented groups and how we can create equity for everyone in Drupal.
Geographic diversity

When measuring geographic diversity, we saw individual contributors from six continents and 114 countries:

Contribution credits per capita calculated as the amount of contributions per continent divided by the population of each continent. 0.001% means that one in 100,000 people contribute to Drupal. In North America, 5 in 100,000 people contributed to Drupal the last year.Contributions from Europe and North America are both on the rise. In absolute terms, Europe contributes more than North America, but North America contributes more per capita.

Asia, South America and Africa remain big opportunities for Drupal, as their combined population accounts for 6.3 billion out of 7.5 billion people in the world. Unfortunately, the reported contributions from Asia are declining year over year. For example, compared to last year's report, there was a 17% drop in contribution from India. Despite that drop, India remains the second largest contributor behind the United States:

The top 20 countries from which contributions originate. The data is compiled by aggregating the countries of all individual contributors behind each issue. Note that the geographical location of contributors doesn't always correspond with the origin of their sponsorship. Wim Leers, for example, works from Belgium, but his funding comes from Acquia, which has the majority of its customers in North America.Top contributor details

To create more awareness of which organizations are sponsoring the top individual contributors, I included a more detailed overview of the top 50 contributors and their sponsors. If you are a Drupal developer looking for work, these are some of the companies I'd apply to first. If you are an end user looking for a company to work with, these are some of the companies I'd consider working with first. Not only do they know Drupal well, they also help improve your investment in Drupal.

Rank
Username
Issues
Volunteer
Sponsored
Not specified
Sponsors
1
kiamlaluno
1610
99%
0%
1%

2
jrockowitz
756
98%
99%
0%
The Big Blue House (750), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (5), Rosewood Marketing (1)
3
alexpott
642
6%
80%
19%
Thunder (336), Acro Media Inc (100), Chapter Three (77)
4
RajabNatshah
616
1%
100%
0%
Vardot (730), Webship (2)
5
volkswagenchick
519
2%
99%
0%
Hook 42 (341), Kanopi Studios (171)
6
bojanz
504
0%
98%
2%
Centarro (492), Ny Media AS (28), Torchbox (5), Liip (2), Adapt (2)
7
alonaoneill
489
9%
99%
0%
Hook 42 (484)
8
thalles
488
0%
100%
0%
CI&T (488), Janrain (3), Johnson & Johnson (2)
9
Wim Leers
437
8%
97%
0%
Acquia (421), Government of Flanders (3)
10
DamienMcKenna
431
0%
97%
3%
Mediacurrent (420)
11
Berdir
424
0%
92%
8%
MD Systems (390)
12
chipway
356
0%
100%
0%
Chipway (356)
13
larowlan
324
16%
94%
2%
PreviousNext (304), Charles Darwin University (22), University of Technology, Sydney (3), Service NSW (2), Department of Justice & Regulation, Victoria (1)
14
pifagor
320
52%
100%
0%
GOLEMS GABB (618), EPAM Systems (16), Drupal Ukraine Community (6)
15
catch
313
1%
95%
4%
Third & Grove (286), Tag1 Consulting (11), Drupal Association (6), Acquia (4)
16
mglaman
277
2%
98%
1%
Centarro (271), Oomph, Inc. (16), E.C. Barton & Co (3), Gaggle.net, Inc. (1), Bluespark (1), Thinkbean (1), LivePerson, Inc (1), Impactiv, Inc. (1), Rosewood Marketing (1), Acro Media Inc (1)
17
adci_contributor
274
0%
100%
0%
ADCI Solutions (273)
18
quietone
266
41%
75%
1%
Acro Media Inc (200)
19
tim.plunkett
265
3%
89%
9%
Acquia (235)
20
gaurav.kapoor
253
0%
51%
49%
OpenSense Labs (129), DrupalFit (111)
21
RenatoG
246
0%
100%
0%
CI&T (246), Johnson & Johnson (85)
22
heddn
243
2%
98%
2%
MTech, LLC (202), Tag1 Consulting (32), European Commission (22), North Studio (3), Acro Media Inc (2)
23
chr.fritsch
241
0%
99%
1%
Thunder (239)
24
xjm
238
0%
85%
15%
Acquia (202)
25
phenaproxima
238
0%
100%
0%
Acquia (238)
26
mkalkbrenner
235
0%
100%
0%
bio.logis Genetic Information Management GmbH (234), OSCE: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (41), Welsh Government (4)
27
gvso
232
0%
100%
0%
Google Summer of Code (214), Google Code-In (16), Zivtech (1)
28
dawehner
219
39%
84%
8%
Chapter Three (176), Drupal Association (5), Tag1 Consulting (3), TES Global (1)
29
e0ipso
218
99%
100%
0%
Lullabot (217), IBM (23)
30
drumm
205
0%
98%
1%
Drupal Association (201)
31
gabesullice
199
0%
100%
0%
Acquia (198), Aten Design Group (1)
32
amateescu
194
0%
97%
3%
Pfizer, Inc. (186), Drupal Association (1), Chapter Three (1)
33
klausi
193
2%
59%
40%
jobiqo - job board technology (113)
34
samuel.mortenson
187
42%
42%
17%
Acquia (79)
35
joelpittet
187
28%
78%
14%
The University of British Columbia (146)
36
borisson_
185
83%
50%
3%
Calibrate (79), Dazzle (13), Intracto digital agency (1)
37
Gábor Hojtsy
184
0%
97%
3%
Acquia (178)
38
adriancid
182
91%
22%
2%
Drupiter (40)
39
eiriksm
182
0%
100%
0%
Violinist (178), Ny Media AS (4)
40
yas
179
12%
80%
10%
DOCOMO Innovations, Inc. (143)
41
TR
177
0%
0%
100%

42
hass
173
1%
0%
99%

43
Joachim Namyslo
172
69%
0%
31%

44
alex_optim
171
0%
99%
1%
GOLEMS GABB (338)
45
flocondetoile
168
0%
99%
1%
Flocon de toile (167)
46
Lendude
168
52%
99%
0%
Dx Experts (91), ezCompany (67), Noctilaris (9)
47
paulvandenburg
167
11%
72%
21%
ezCompany (120)
48
voleger
165
98%
98%
2%
GOLEMS GABB (286), Lemberg Solutions Limited (36), Drupal Ukraine Community (1)
49
lauriii
164
3%
98%
1%
Acquia (153), Druid (8), Lääkärikeskus Aava Oy (2)
50
idebr
162
0%
99%
1%
ezCompany (156), One Shoe (5)
Limitations of the credit system

It is important to note a few of the current limitations of Drupal.org's credit system:

The credit system doesn't capture all code contributions. Parts of Drupal are developed on GitHub rather than Drupal.org, and often aren't fully credited on Drupal.org. For example, Drush is maintained on GitHub instead of Drupal.org, and companies like Pantheon don't get credit for that work. The Drupal Association is working to integrate GitLab with Drupal.org. GitLab will provide support for "merge requests", which means contributing to Drupal will feel more familiar to the broader audience of Open Source contributors who learned their skills in the post-patch era. Some of GitLab's tools, such as in-line editing and web-based code review will also lower the barrier to contribution, and should help us grow both the number of contributions and contributors on Drupal.org.
The credit system is not used by everyone. There are many ways to contribute to Drupal that are still not captured in the credit system, including things like event organizing or providing support. Technically, that work could be captured as demonstrated by the various non-product initiatives highlighted in this post. Because using the credit system is optional, many contributors don't. As a result, contributions often have incomplete or no contribution credits. We need to encourage all Drupal contributors to use the credit system, and raise awareness of its benefits to both individuals and organizations. Where possible, we should automatically capture credits. For example, translation efforts on https://localize.drupal.org are not currently captured in the credit system but could be automatically.
The credit system disincentives work on complex issues. We currently don't have a way to account for the complexity and quality of contributions; one person might have worked several weeks for just one credit, while another person might receive a credit for 10 minutes of work. We certainly see a few individuals and organizations trying to game the credit system. In the future, we should consider issuing credit data in conjunction with issue priority, patch size, number of reviews, etc. This could help incentivize people to work on larger and more important problems and save smaller issues such as coding standards improvements for new contributor sprints. Implementing a scoring system that ranks the complexity of an issue would also allow us to develop more accurate reports of contributed work.
All of this means that the actual number of contributions and contributors could be significantly higher than what we report.

Like Drupal itself, the Drupal.org credit system needs to continue to evolve. Ultimately, the credit system will only be useful when the community uses it, understands its shortcomings, and suggests constructive improvements.

A first experiment with weighing credits

As a simple experiment, I decided to weigh each credit based on the adoption of the project the credit is attributed to. For example, each contribution credit to Drupal core is given a weight of 11 because Drupal core has about 1,1 million active installations. Credits to the Webform module, which has over 400,000 installations, get a weight of 4. And credits to Drupal's Commerce project gets just 1 point as it is installed on fewer than 100,000 sites.

The idea is that these weights capture the end user impact of each contribution, but also act as a proxy for the effort required to get a change committed. Getting a change accepted in Drupal core is both more difficult and more impactful than getting a change accepted to Commerce project.

This weighting is far from perfect as it undervalues non-product contributions, and it still doesn't recognize all types of product contributions (e.g. product strategy work, product management work, release management work, etc). That said, for code contributions, it may be more accurate than a purely unweighted approach.

The top 30 contributing individuals based on weighted Drupal.org issue credits.The top 30 contributing organizations based on weighted Drupal.org issue credits.

Conclusions

Our data confirms that Drupal is a vibrant community full of contributors who are constantly evolving and improving the software. It's amazing to see that just in the last year, Drupal welcomed more than 8,000 individuals contributors and over 1,100 corporate contributors. It's especially nice to see the number of reported contributions, individual contributors and organizational contributors increase year over year.

To grow and sustain Drupal, we should support those that contribute to Drupal and find ways to get those that are not contributing involved in our community. Improving diversity within Drupal is critical, and we should welcome any suggestions that encourage participation from a broader range of individuals and organizations.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Drupal's long-term growth obstacles

Drupal 8 has been growing 40 to 50 percent year over year. It's a healthy growth rate. Regardless, it is always worth exploring how we can continue to accelerate that growth.
Earlier this week, I wrote about the power of removing obstacles to growth, and shared how Amazon approaches its own growth blockers. Amazon identified at least two blockers for long-term growth: (1) shipping costs and (2) shipping times. For more than a decade, Amazon has been focused on eliminating both. They have spent an unbelievable amount of creativity, effort, time, and money to eliminate them.
In that blog post, I promised to share my thoughts around Drupal's own growth barriers. What obstacles can we eliminate to fuel Drupal's long-term growth? Well, I believe the limitations to Drupal's growth can be summarized as:
Make Drupal easy to evaluate and adopt
Make Drupal easy for content creators and site builders
Reduce the total cost of ownership for developers and site owners
Keep Drupal relevant and impactful
Promote Drupal and help Drupal agencies win
For those that have read my blog or watched my DrupalCon keynote presentations, none of these will come as a surprise. Just like Amazon's examples, fixing these obstacles have been, and will be, multi-year efforts.

Drupal's five product strategy tracks. A number of current initiatives is shown on each track.
1. Make Drupal easy to evaluate and adopt
We need to make it easy for more people to try Drupal. To help evaluators explore Drupal's possibilities, we improved the download and installation experience, and included a demonstration site with core. We made fantastic progress on this in 2018.
Now that we have improved the evaluator experience, I'd love to see us focus on the "new user" experience. When you put yourself in the shoes of a new Drupal user, you'd still find it hard to set up a local development environment. There are too many options, too little direction, and no one official way for how to get started with Drupal. The "new user" is not receiving enough attention, and that slows adoption so I'd love to see us focus no that in 2019.
2. Make Drupal easy for content creators and site builders
One of the most powerful trends I've noticed time and time again is that simplicity wins. People expect software to be functionally powerful and easy to use. This is especially true for content creators and site builders.
To make Drupal easier to use for content creators and site builders, we've introduced WYSIWYG and in-place editing in Drupal 8.0, and now we're working hard on media management, layout building, content workflows and a new administration and authoring UI.
A lot of these initiatives add tools to the UI that empower content creators and site builders to do more with less code. Long term, I believe that we need to more of these "no-code" or "low-code" capabilities in Drupal.
3. Reduce the total cost of ownership for developers and site owners
Developers want to be agile, fast and deliver high quality projects that add value for their organization. Developers don't want their tools to get in the way.
For Drupal this means that they want to build sites, including themes and modules, without being bogged down by complex upgrades, expensive migrations or cumbersome developer workflows.
For developers and site owners we have made upgrades easier, we adopted a 6-month innovation model, and we extended security coverage for minor releases. This removes the complexity from major upgrades, gives organizations more time to upgrade, and allows us to release new capabilities more frequently. This is a very big deal for developer and site owners!
In addition, we're working on improving Drupal's Composer support and configuration management capabilities. This will help developers automate and streamline their day-to-day work.
Longer term, improved Composer support could act as a stepping stone towards automated updates, which would be one of the most effective ways to free up a developer's time.
4. Keep Drupal relevant and impactful
The innovation in the Drupal ecosystem happens thanks to Drupal contributors. We need to attract new contributors to Drupal, and keep existing contributors excited. This means we have to keep Drupal relevant and impactful.
To keep Drupal relevant, we've been investing in making Drupal an API-first platform for many years now. Headless Drupal or decoupled Drupal is one of Drupal's competitive advantages. Drupal's web service APIs allow developers to use Drupal with their JavaScript framework of choice, push content to different channels, and better integrate Drupal with different technologies in the marketing stack.
Drupal developers can now do unprecedented things with Drupal that weren't available before. JavaScript and mobile application developers have been familiarizing themselves with Drupal due to its improved API-first capabilities. All of this keeps Drupal relevant, ensures that Drupal has high impact, and that we attract new developers to Drupal.
5. Promote Drupal and help Drupal agencies win
While Drupal is well-known as an Open Source project, there isn't a deep understanding of how Drupal is evolving or how Drupal compares to its competitors.
Drupal is improving rapidly every six months with each new minor version release, but I'm not sure we're getting that message out effectively. We need to promote our amazing progress, not only to everyone in the web development community, but also to marketers and content managers, who are now often weighing in heavily on CMS decisions.
We do an incredible job collaborating on code — thousands of us are helping to build Drupal — but we do a poor job collaborating on marketing, education and promotion. Imagine what could happen if these thousands of individuals and agencies would all collaborate on promoting Drupal!
That is why the Drupal Association started the Promote Drupal initiative, and why we're trying to rally people in the community to work together on creating pitch decks, case studies, and other collateral to promote and market Drupal.
Here are a few things already happening:
There is an updated Drupal Brand Book for organizations to follow as they design Drupal marketing and sales materials.
A team of volunteers is creating a comprehensive Drupal pitch deck that Drupal agencies can use as a starting point when working with new clients.
DrupalCon will have new Content & Digital Marketing Track for marketing teams responsible for content generation, demand generation, user journeys, and more; and a "Agency Leadership Track" for those running Drupal agencies.
We will begin work on a competitive comparison chart — contrasting Drupal with other CMS competitors like Adobe, Sitecore, Contentful, WordPress, Prismic, and more.
A number of local Drupal Associations are hiring marketing people to help promote Drupal in their region.
Just like all open source contribution, it takes many to move things forward. So far, 40 people have signed up to help with these marketing efforts. If your organization has a marketing team that would like to contribute to the marketing of Drupal, check out the Promote Drupal initiative page and please join the Promote Drupal team.
Educating the world about how Drupal is evolving, the amazing use cases we support, and how Drupal compares to old and new competitors will go a very long way towards raising awareness of the project and growing the businesses built on and around Drupal.
Final thoughts
After talking to hundreds of Drupal users and would-be users, as well as dozens of agency owners, I believe we're working on the right things. Overcoming these growth obstacles are multi-year efforts. While the various initiatives might change, I believe we'll keep working on these four tracks for the next decade. We've been making steady progress the last few years but need to remain both patient and committed to driving them home. Just like Amazon continues to work on their growth obstacles after more than a decade, I expect we'll be working on these four obstacles for many years to come.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


What's new in the Commerce 2.10 release?

We made many important improvements to Drupal Commerce over the summer, including an improved promotions UI, BOGO offers, and product category conditions in the 2.8 release and full list price support with the 2.9 release. After a long sprint to the finish, we’ve now finally released 2.10, one of our largest releases to date that resolves 39 issues and feature requests.

Product administration improvements

Six years ago we released the first stable version of Commerce Kickstart 2.x and the new (at the time) Inline Entity Form module, which allowed us to manage multiple product variations from a single product page form for the first time. Since then, Inline Entity Form has become a popular Drupal module and a recommended way to manage products in Drupal 7. When we started developing Commerce 2.x for Drupal 8, we ported over Inline Entity Form and the previous approach to managing products, but now we’re ready to take another step forward to advance the usability and performance of product management.

As of the 2.10 release, product variations are managed on their own tab of the product page form. This follows the same UI pattern we established for coupons within the promotions UI.

Product variations shown on their own tab.

Moving variations to their own tab allows us to extend the UI in future releases, specifically to add bulk operations for tasks such as price updates, image replacement, and even the creation of a full set of variations. We foresee other modules adding their own elements to the tab, like the Commerce Pricelist module adding a “Prices” dropbutton item to provide quick access to every price for a variation on multiple price lists.

Having variations on a separate tab would be a bit much for products that always only have a single variation, so we’ve made sure to accommodate that use case in the new version. Each product type’s settings form includes an “Allow each product to have multiple variations.” option that when disabled reverts to the inline editing experience for products of that type.

Inline product editing for single variations.

Query access filtering

If you create a new role for your merchant and only give it the “Book: View products” permission, you’d expect users with that role to be able to book products but no others. In Drupal 7, our solution for this was a generic query access API in Drupal Commerce itself that filtered entity loading queries based on user permissions.

To achieve this same result in Drupal 8, we've rebuilt this API and added it to the recent 8.x-1.0-rc1 release of the Entity API module. Commerce is now using it for administrative listings of products, orders, and stores. The API adds a QueryAccessEvent to allow modules to alter the access conditions, making it possible to apply further filtering (e.g. only show the user’s own store). Next we will extend the filtering to Search API to filter customer facing listings.

User-driven API improvements

Over 4,000 websites have launched on Commerce 2.x in the past year, pushing us up over 6,000 in total. As developers launch their projects, we keep our lines of communication open to hear about all the things that annoyed or hindered them, and we work to improve our APIs as a result. Several examples that made it into this release include:

(Note that as a result of the last two, if you have overridden the PaymentInformation or PaymentProcess panes on your site, you will need to update them for the new release.)

We love to hear stories of the great things you’re doing with Drupal Commerce, and we’d also love to improve the core APIs and data model to better support you, too. Feel free to join us and hundreds of other developers in the #commerce channel on Drupal Slack for real-time discussion or post your proposals directly to the issue queue for discussion.


Source: Reposted from: drupalcommerce.org


Who sponsors Drupal development? (2017-2018 edition)

For the past two years, I've examined Drupal.org's commit data to understand who develops Drupal, how much of that work is sponsored, and where that sponsorship comes from.

I have now reported on this data for three years in a row, which means I can start to better compare year-over-year data. Understanding how an open-source project works is important because it establishes a benchmark for project health and scalability.

I would also recommend taking a look at the 2016 report or the 2017 report. Each report looks at data collected in the 12-month period between July 1st and June 30th.

This year's report affirms that Drupal has a large and diverse community of contributors. In the 12-month period between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018, 7,287 different individuals and 1,002 different organizations contributed code to Drupal.org. This include contributions to Drupal core and all contributed projects on Drupal.org.

In comparison to last year's report, both the number of contributors and contributions has increased. Our community of contributors (including both individuals and organizations) is also becoming more diverse. This is an important area of growth, but there is still work to do.

For this report, we looked at all of the issues marked "closed" or "fixed" in our ticketing system in the 12-month period from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018. This includes Drupal core and all of the contributed projects on Drupal.org, across all major versions of Drupal. This year, 24,447 issues were marked "closed" or "fixed", a 5% increase from the 23,238 issues in the 2016-2017 period. This averages out to 67 feature improvements or bug fixes a day.

In total, we captured 49,793 issue credits across all 24,447 issues. This marks a 17% increase from the 42,449 issue credits recorded in the previous year. Of the 49,793 issue credits reported this year, 18% (8,822 credits) were for Drupal core, while 82% (40,971 credits) went to contributed projects.

"Closed" or "fixed" issues are often the result of multiple people working on the issue. We try to capture who contributes through Drupal.org's unique credit system. We used the data from the credit system for this analysis. There are a few limitations with this approach, which we'll address at the end of this report.

What is the Drupal.org credit system?

In the spring of 2015, after proposing ideas for giving credit and discussing various approaches at length, Drupal.org added the ability for people to attribute their work to an organization or customer in the Drupal.org issue queues. Maintainers of Drupal modules, themes, and distributions can award issue credits to people who help resolve issues with code, translations, documentation, design and more.

A screenshot of an issue comment on Drupal.org. You can see that jamadar worked on this patch as a volunteer, but also as part of his day job working for TATA Consultancy Services on behalf of their customer, Pfizer.
Credits are a powerful motivator for both individuals and organizations. Accumulating credits provides individuals with a way to showcase their expertise. Organizations can utilize credits to help recruit developers, to increase their visibility within the Drupal.org marketplace, or to showcase their Drupal expertise.

Who is working on Drupal?

In the 12-month period between July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018, 24,447, Drupal.org received code contributions from 7,287 different individuals and 1,002 different organizations.

While the number of individual contributors rose, a relatively small number of individuals still do the majority of the work. Approximately 48% of individual contributors received just one credit. Meanwhile, the top 30 contributors (the top 0.4%) account for more than 24% of the total credits. These individuals put an incredible amount of time and effort in developing Drupal and its contributed projects:

RankUsernameIssues1RenatoG8512RajabNatshah7453jrockowitz7004adriancid5295bojanz5156Berdir4327alexpott4148mglaman4149Wim Leers39510larowlan36011DamienMcKenna35312dawehner34013catch33914heddn32715xjm30316pifagor28417quietone26118borisson_25519adci_contributor25520volkswagenchick25421drunken monkey23122amateescu22523joachim19924mkalkbrenner19525chr.fritsch18526gaurav.kapoor17827phenaproxima17728mikeytown217329joelpittet17030timmillwood169Out of the top 30 contributors featured, 15 were also recognized as top contributors in our 2017 report. These Drupalists' dedication and continued contribution to the project has been crucial to Drupal's development. It's also exciting to see 15 new names on the list. This mobility is a testament to the community's evolution and growth. It's also important to recognize that a majority of the 15 repeat top contributors are at least partially sponsored by an organization. We value the organizations that sponsor these remarkable individuals, because without their support, it could be more challenging to be in the top 30 year over year.

How diverse is Drupal?

Next, we looked at both the gender and geographic diversity of Drupal.org code contributors. While these are only two examples of diversity, this is the only available data that contributors can currently choose to share on their Drupal.org profiles. The reported data shows that only 7% of the recorded contributions were made by contributors that do not identify as male, which continues to indicates a steep gender gap. This is a one percent increase compared to last year. The gender imbalance in Drupal is profound and underscores the need to continue fostering diversity and inclusion in our community.

To address this gender gap, in addition to advancing representation across various demographics, the Drupal community is supporting two important initiatives. The first is to adopt more inclusive user demographic forms on Drupal.org. Adopting Open Demographics on Drupal.org will also allow us to improve reporting on diversity and inclusion, which in turn will help us better support initiatives that advance diversity and inclusion. The second initiative is supporting the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Contribution Team, which works to better include underrepresented groups to increase code and community contributions. The DDI Contribution Team recruits team members from diverse backgrounds and underrepresented groups, and provides support and mentorship to help them contribute to Drupal.

It's important to reiterate that supporting diversity and inclusion within Drupal is essential to the health and success of the project. The people who work on Drupal should reflect the diversity of people who use and work with the software. While there is still a lot of work to do, I'm excited about the impact these various initiatives will have on future reports.

When measuring geographic diversity, we saw individual contributors from 6 different continents and 123 different countries:

The top 20 countries from which contributions originate. The data is compiled by aggregating the countries of all individual contributors behind each commit. Note that the geographical location of contributors doesn't always correspond with the origin of their sponsorship. Wim Leers, for example, works from Belgium, but his funding comes from Acquia, which has the majority of its customers in North America.
123 different countries is seven more compared to the 2017 report. The new countries include Rwanda, Namibia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Swaziland, Zambia. Seeing contributions from more African countries is certainly a highlight.

How much of the work is sponsored?

Issue credits can be marked as "volunteer" and "sponsored" simultaneously (shown in jamadar's screenshot near the top of this post). This could be the case when a contributor does the minimum required work to satisfy the customer's need, in addition to using their spare time to add extra functionality.

While Drupal started out as a 100% volunteer-driven project, today the majority of the code on Drupal.org is sponsored by organizations. Only 12% of the commit credits that we examined in 2017-2018 were "purely volunteer" credits (6,007 credits), in stark contrast to the 49% that were "purely sponsored". In other words, there were four times as many "purely sponsored" credits as "purely volunteer" credits.

A few comparisons between the 2017-2018 and the 2016-2017 data:

The credit system is being used more frequently. In total, we captured 49,793 issue credits across all 24,447 issues in the 2017-2018 period. This marks a 17% increase from the 42,449 issue credits recorded in the previous year. Between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017, 28% of all credits had no attribution while in the period between July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018, only 25% of credits lacked attribution. More people have become aware of the credit system, the attribution options, and their benefits.
Sponsored credits are growing faster than volunteer credits. Both "purely volunteer" and "purely sponsored" credits grew, but "purely sponsored" credits grew faster. There are two reasons why this could be the case: (1) more contributions are sponsored and (2) organizations are more likely to use the credit system compared to volunteers.
No data is perfect, but it feels safe to conclude that most of the work on Drupal is sponsored. At the same time, the data shows that volunteer contribution remains very important to Drupal. Maybe most importantly, while the number of volunteers and sponsors has grown year over year in absolute terms, sponsored contributions appear to be growing faster than volunteer contributions. This is consistent with how open source projects grow and scale.

Who is sponsoring the work?

Now that we've established a majority of contributions to Drupal are sponsored, we want to study which organizations contribute to Drupal. While 1,002 different organizations contributed to Drupal, approximately 50% of them received four credits or less. The top 30 organizations (roughly the top 3%) account for approximately 48% of the total credits, which implies that the top 30 companies play a crucial role in the health of the Drupal project. The graph below shows the top 30 organizations and the number of credits they received between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018:

The top 30 contributing organizations based on the number of Drupal.org commit credits.
While not immediately obvious from the graph above, a variety of different types of companies are active in Drupal's ecosystem:

Category
Description
Traditional Drupal businesses
Small-to-medium-sized professional services companies that primarily make money using Drupal. They typically employ fewer than 100 employees, and because they specialize in Drupal, many of these professional services companies contribute frequently and are a huge part of our community. Examples are Chapter Three and Lullabot (both shown on graph).
Digital marketing agencies
Larger full-service agencies that have marketing-led practices using a variety of tools, typically including Drupal, Adobe Experience Manager, Sitecore, WordPress, etc. They tend to be larger, with the larger agencies employing thousands of people. Examples are Wunderman and Mirum.
System integrators
Larger companies that specialize in bringing together different technologies into one solution. Example system agencies are Accenture, TATA Consultancy Services, Capgemini and CI&T (shown on graph).
Technology and infrastructure companies
Examples are Acquia (shown on graph), Lingotek, BlackMesh, Rackspace, Pantheon and Platform.sh.
End-users
Examples are Pfizer (shown on graph) or NBCUniversal.
A few observations:

Almost all of the sponsors in the top 30 are traditional Drupal businesses. Companies like MD Systems (12 employees), Valuebound (58 employees), Chapter Three (33 employees), Commerce Guys (13 employees) and PreviousNext (22 employees) are, despite their size, critical to Drupal's success.
Compared to these traditional Drupal businesses, Acquia has nearly 800 employees and at least ten full-time Drupal contributors. Acquia works to resolve some of the most complex issues on Drupal.org, many of which are not recognized by the credit system (e.g. release management, communication, sprint organizing, and project coordination). Acquia added several full-time contributors compared to last year, however, I believe that Acquia should contribute even more due to its comparative size.
No digital marketing agencies show up in the top 30, though some of them are starting to contribute. It's exciting that an increasing number of digital marketing agencies are delivering beautiful experiences using Drupal. As a community, we need to work to ensure that each of these firms are contributing back to the project with the same commitment that we see from firms like Commerce Guys, CI&T or Acro Media. Compared to last year, we have not made meaningful progress on growing contributions from digital marketing agencies. It would be interesting to see what would happen if more large organizations mandated contributions from their partners. Pfizer, for example, only works with agencies and vendors that contribute back to Drupal, and requires that its agency partners contribute to open source. If more organizations took this stance, it could have a big impact on the number of digital agencies that contribute to Drupal
The only system integrator in the top 30 is CI&T, which ranked 3rd with 959 credits. As far as system integrators are concerned, CI&T is a smaller player with approximately 2,500 employees. However, we do see various system integrators outside of the top 30, including Globant, Capgemini, Sapient and TATA Consultancy Services. Each of these system integrators reported 30 to 85 credits in the past year. The top contributor is TATA with 85 credits.
Infrastructure and software companies also play an important role in our community, yet only Acquia appears in the top 30. While Acquia has a professional services division, more than 75% of the contributions come from the product organization. Other infrastructure companies include Pantheon and Platform.sh, which are both venture-backed, platform-as-a-service companies that were born from the Drupal community. Pantheon has 6 credits and Platform.sh has 47 credits. Amazee Labs, a company that is building an infrastructure business, reported 40 credits. Compared to last year, Acquia and Rackspace have slightly more credits, while Pantheon, Platform.sh and Amazee contributed less. Lingotek, a vendor that offers cloud-based translation management software has 84 credits.
We also saw three end-users in the top 30 as corporate sponsors: Pfizer (491 credits, up from 251 credits the year before), Thunder (432 credits), and the German company, bio.logis (319 credits, up from 212 credits the year before). Other notable customers outside of the top 30, include Workday, Wolters Kluwer, Burda Media, YMCA and OpenY, CARD.com and NBCUniversal. We also saw contributions from many universities, including University of Colorado Boulder, University of Waterloo, Princeton University, University of Adelaide, University of Sydney, University of Edinburgh, McGill University and more.
We can conclude that technology and infrastructure companies, digital marketing agencies, system integrators and end-users are not making significant code contributions to Drupal.org today. How can we explain this disparity in comparison to the traditional Drupal businesses that contribute the most? We believe the biggest reasons are:

Drupal's strategic importance. A variety of the traditional Drupal agencies almost entirely depend on Drupal to support their businesses. Given both their expertise and dependence on Drupal, they are most likely to look after Drupal's development and well-being. Contrast this with most of the digital marketing agencies and system integrators who work with a diversified portfolio of content management platforms. Their well-being is less dependent on Drupal's success.
The level of experience with Drupal and open source. Drupal aside, many organizations have little or no experience with open source, so it is important that we motivate and teach them to contribute.
Legal reservations. We recognize that some organizations are not legally permitted to contribute, let alone attribute their customers. We hope that will change as open source continues to get adopted.
Tools barriers. Drupal contribution still involves a patch-based workflow on Drupal.org's unique issue queue system. This presents a fairly steep learning curve to most developers, who primarily work with more modern and common tools such as GitHub. We hope to lower some of these barriers through our collaboration with GitLab.
Process barriers. Getting code changes accepted into a Drupal project — especially Drupal core — is hard work. Peer reviews, gates such as automated testing and documentation, required sign-offs from maintainers and committers, knowledge of best practices and other community norms are a few of the challenges a contributor must face to get code accepted into Drupal. Collaborating with thousands of people on a project as large and widely-used as Drupal requires such processes, but new contributors often don't know that these processes exist, or don't understand why they exist.
We should do more to entice contribution

Drupal is used by more than one million websites. Everyone who uses Drupal benefits from work that thousands of other individuals and organizations have contributed. Drupal is great because it is continuously improved by a diverse community of contributors who are enthusiastic to give back.

However, the vast majority of the individuals and organizations behind these Drupal websites never participate in the development of the project. They might use the software as it is or don't feel the need to help drive its development. We have to provide more incentive for these individuals and organizations to contribute back to the project.

Consequently, this data shows that the Drupal community can do more to entice companies to contribute code to Drupal.org. The Drupal community has a long tradition of encouraging organizations to share code rather than keep it behind firewalls. While the spirit of the Drupal project cannot be reduced to any single ideology — not every organization can or will share their code — we would like to see organizations continue to prioritize collaboration over individual ownership.

We understand and respect that some can give more than others and that some might not be able to give back at all. Our goal is not to foster an environment that demands what and how others should give back. Our aim is not to criticize those who do not contribute, but rather to help foster an environment worthy of contribution. This is clearly laid out in Drupal's Values and Principles.

Given the vast amount of Drupal users, we believe continuing to encourage organizations and end-users to contribute is still a big opportunity. From my own conversations, it's clear that organizations still need need education, training and help. They ask questions like: "Where can we contribute?", "How can we convince our legal department?", and more.

There are substantial benefits and business drivers for organizations that contribute: (1) it improves their ability to sell and win deals and (2) it improves their ability to hire. Companies that contribute to Drupal tend to promote their contributions in RFPs and sales pitches. Contributing to Drupal also results in being recognized as a great place to work for Drupal experts.

What projects have sponsors?

To understand where the organizations sponsoring Drupal put their money, I've listed the top 20 most sponsored projects:

RankProject nameIssues1Drupal core59192Webform9053Drupal Commerce6074Varbase: The Ultimate Drupal 8 CMS Starter Kit (Bootstrap Ready)5515Commerce Point of Sale (POS)3246Views3187Commerce Migrate3078JSON API3049Paragraphs27210Open Social22211Search API Solr Search21212Drupal Connector for Janrain Identity Cloud19713Drupal.org security advisory coverage applications18914Facets17115Open Y16216Metatag16217Web Page Archive15418Drupal core - JavaScript Modernization Initiative14519Thunder14420XML sitemap120Who is sponsoring the top 30 contributors?

Rank
Username
Issues
Volunteer
Sponsored
Not specified
Sponsors
1
RenatoG
851
0%
100%
0%
CI&T (850), Johnson & Johnson (23)
2
RajabNatshah
745
14%
100%
0%
Vardot (653), Webship (90)
3
jrockowitz
700
94%
97%
1%
The Big Blue House (680), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (7), Rosewood Marketing (2), Kennesaw State University (1)
4
adriancid
529
99%
19%
0%
Ville de Montréal (98)
5
bojanz
515
0%
98%
2%
Commerce Guys (503), Torchbox (17), Adapt (6), Acro Media (4), Bluespark (1)
6
Berdir
432
0%
92%
8%
MD Systems (396), Translations.com (10), Acquia (2)
7
alexpott
414
13%
84%
10%
Chapter Three (123), Thunder (120), Acro Media (103)
8
mglaman
414
5%
96%
1%
Commerce Guys (393), Impactiv (17), Circle Web Foundry (16), Rosewood Marketing (14), LivePerson (13), Bluespark (4), Acro Media (4), Gaggle.net (3), Thinkbean (2), Matsmart (2)
9
Wim Leers
395
8%
94%
0%
Acquia (371)
10
larowlan
360
13%
97%
1%
PreviousNext (350), University of Technology, Sydney (24), Charles Darwin University (10), Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) (1), Department of Justice & Regulation, Victoria (1)
11
DamienMcKenna
353
1%
95%
5%
Mediacurrent (334)
12
dawehner
340
48%
86%
4%
Chapter Three (279), Torchbox (10), Drupal Association (5), Tag1 Consulting (3), Acquia (2), TES Global (1)
13
catch
339
1%
97%
3%
Third and Grove (320), Tag1 Consulting (8)
14
heddn
327
2%
99%
1%
MTech (325)
15
xjm
303
0%
97%
3%
Acquia (293)
16
pifagor
284
32%
99%
1%
GOLEMS GABB (423), Drupal Ukraine Community (73)
17
quietone
261
48%
55%
5%
Acro Media (143)
18
borisson_
255
93%
55%
3%
Dazzle (136), Intracto digital agency (1), Acquia (1), DUG BE vzw (Drupal User Group Belgium) (1)
19
adci_contributor
255
0%
100%
0%
ADCI Solutions (255)
20
volkswagenchick
254
1%
100%
0%
Hook 42 (253)
21
drunken monkey
231
91%
22%
0%
DBC (24), Vizala (20), Sunlime Web Innovations GmbH (4), Wunder Group (1), epiqo (1), Zebralog (1)
22
amateescu
225
3%
95%
3%
Pfizer (211), Drupal Association (1), Chapter Three (1)
23
joachim
199
56%
44%
19%
Torchbox (88)
24
mkalkbrenner
195
0%
99%
1%
bio.logis (193), OSCE: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (119)
25
chr.fritsch
185
0%
99%
1%
Thunder (183)
26
gaurav.kapoor
178
0%
81%
19%
OpenSense Labs (144), DrupalFit (55)
27
phenaproxima
177
0%
99%
1%
Acquia (176)
28
mikeytown2
173
0%
0%
100%

29
joelpittet
170
28%
74%
16%
The University of British Columbia (125)
30
timmillwood
169
1%
100%
0%
Pfizer (169), Appnovation (163), Millwood Online (6)
We observe that the top 30 contributors are sponsored by 58 organizations. This kind of diversity is aligned with our desire to make sure that Drupal is not controlled by a single organization. These top contributors and organizations are from many different parts of the world, and work with customers large and small. Nonetheless, we will continue to benefit from an increased distribution of contribution.

Limitations of the credit system and the data

While the benefits are evident, it is important to note a few of the limitations in Drupal.org's current credit system:

Contributing to issues on Drupal.org is not the only way to contribute. Other activities, such as sponsoring events, promoting Drupal, and providing help and mentorship are also important to the long-term health of the Drupal project. Many of these activities are not currently captured by the credit system. For this post, we chose to only look at code contributions.
We acknowledge that parts of Drupal are developed on GitHub and therefore aren't fully credited on Drupal.org. The actual number of contributions and contributors could be significantly higher than what we report. The Drupal Association is working to integrate GitLab with Drupal.org. GitLab will provide support for "merge requests", which means contributing to Drupal will feel more familiar to the broader audience of open source contributors who learned their skills in the post-patch era. Some of GitLab's tools, such as inline editing and web-based code review, will also lower the barrier to contribution, and should help us grow both the number of contributions and contributors on Drupal.org.
Even when development is done on Drupal.org, the credit system is not used consistently. As using the credit system is optional, a lot of code committed on Drupal.org has no or incomplete contribution credits.
Not all code credits are the same. We currently don't have a way to account for the complexity and quality of contributions; one person might have worked several weeks for just one credit, while another person might receive a credit for ten minutes of work. In the future, we should consider issuing credit data in conjunction with issue priority, patch size, etc. This could help incentivize people to work on larger and more important problems and save coding standards improvements for new contributor sprints. Implementing a scoring system that ranks the complexity of an issue would also allow us to develop more accurate reports of contributed work.
Like Drupal itself, the Drupal.org credit system needs to continue to evolve. Ultimately, the credit system will only be useful when the community uses it, understands its shortcomings, and suggests constructive improvements.

Conclusion

Our data confirms that Drupal is a vibrant community full of contributors who are constantly evolving and improving the software. While we have amazing geographic diversity, we still need greater gender diversity, in addition to better representation across various demographic groups. Our analysis of the Drupal.org credit data concludes that most contributions to Drupal are sponsored. At the same time, the data shows that volunteer contribution remains very important to Drupal.

As a community, we need to understand that a healthy open source ecosystem includes more than the traditional Drupal businesses that contribute the most. We still don't see a lot of contribution from the larger digital marketing agencies, system integrators, technology companies, or end-users of Drupal — we believe that might come as these organizations build out their Drupal practices and Drupal becomes more strategic for them.

To grow and sustain Drupal, we should support those that contribute to Drupal and find ways to get those that are not contributing involved in our community. We invite you to help us continue to strengthen our ecosystem.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


A May Full of Drupal Commerce Releases

May was one of our most productive months to date. It was full of releases for the core Commerce modules, our standalone PHP libraries, and essential contributed modules that all work together to comprise Drupal Commerce. While I outlined the highlights in the roadmap issue on drupal.org, these wins are worth sharing more broadly to keep the rest of the Drupal community in the loop.

The biggest release of the month was Drupal Commerce 2.7, which included new features for currency formatting, address form configuration, and stored payment methods. It also fixed a handful of bugs that unblocked other module releases and updated core in response to improvements in our libraries and dependent modules.

We've long discussed how our standalone PHP libraries are exporting expertise off the Drupal island. Addressing and Internationalization, which have each been downloaded over one million times, are our two shining stars. We rolled new releases for each of them in May, improving even further Drupal Commerce's ability to solve the hardest parts of address entry / validation / formatting and currency localization. Refer to the price formatting change record from the 2.7 release to see how the new API is more flexible and performant as a result.

Additionally, we released Address 1.4 and Inline Entity Form 1.0 RC1. The latest Address release unlocks the customer profile’s address field to support collecting less detailed billing addresses. The Inline Entity Form release includes new product information management features, letting you duplicate product variations for faster product data entry.

Inline Entity Form product variation duplication

Thanks to generous sponsorship from Authorize.Net themselves, we've been able to dedicate several weeks to improving their integration this year. The resulting Authorize.Net RC1 release now supports eCheck, Visa Checkout, and 3DSecure payments! We also included several bug fixes related to duplicate customer and payment profiles that appear when migrating from an old system to Drupal Commerce, for example.

While not fully released yet, our Technology Partner integration for Avalara's AvaTax is nearing beta. Jace Bennest from Acro Media contributed heavily by refactoring the module to properly use a TaxType plugin while my co-maintainer Matt Glaman contributed additional fixes to our port from the Drupal 7 integration to prepare it for certification. Thanks, Jace / Acro Media!

When Matt wasn't working on the above contribs, he was collaborating with Lisa Streeter from Commerce Guys to bring Commerce Reports to its first beta release for Drupal 8. The new version takes a completely different approach from the Drupal 7 using lessons we learned developing Lean Commerce Reports. It denormalizes transaction data when an order is placed to support reports generation with or without the Views module, providing a better developer experience and much better performance. Check it out below! (Click to expand.)

Commerce Reports usage demo

We've also been hard at work improving the evaluator experience. The big release for that is Commerce Demo's beta1, which showcases what Drupal Commerce provides out of the box. It creates products and scaffolds out a full product catalog (pictured below). To get the full effect, try it out with our default store theme, Belgrade. The new demo module gets us closer to something like we had with Kickstart 2.x on Drupal 7 - a learning resource for site builders and a way for agencies to more easily demo and sell Drupal Commerce.

Demo product catalog in the Belgrade theme

Finally, I'm very excited to announce that Lisa Streeter is our new documentation lead! Expect some great things to come. She has already done fantastic work with the Commerce Recurring documentation and is working on revising our getting started, installation, and update docs.

Looking at June, we plan on finalizing the query level entity access API, which will allow us to better support marketplace and multi-store Drupal Commerce implementations. We expect to merge user registration after checkout completion, and we will also be focusing on address reuse / copying, Buy One Get One promotion offers, and more product management experience enhancements.


Source: Reposted from: drupalcommerce.org


State of Drupal presentation (April 2018)

© Yes Moon
Last week, I shared my State of Drupal presentation at Drupalcon Nashville. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide more information on how you can participate in the various initiatives presented in my keynote, such as growing Drupal adoption or evolving our community values and principles.
Drupal 8 update

During the first portion of my presentation, I provided an overview of Drupal 8 updates. Last month, the Drupal community celebrated an important milestone with the successful release of Drupal 8.5, which ships with improved features for content creators, site builders, and developers.

Drupal 8 continues to gain momentum, as the number of Drupal 8 sites has grown 51 percent year-over-year:

This graph depicts the number of Drupal 8 sites built since April 2015. Last year there were 159,000 sites and this year there are 241,000 sites, representing a 51% increase year-over-year.Drupal 8's module ecosystem is also maturing quickly, as 81 percent more Drupal 8 modules have become stable in the past year:

This graph depicts the number of modules now stable since January 2016. This time last year there were 1,028 stable projects and this year there are 1,860 stable projects, representing an 81% increase year-over-year.As you can see from the Drupal 8 roadmap, improving the ease of use for content creators remains our top priority:

This roadmap depicts Drupal 8.5, 8.6, and 8.7+, along with a column for "wishlist" items that are not yet formally slotted. The contents of this roadmap can be found at https://www.drupal.org/core/roadmap.Four ways to grow Drupal adoption

Drupal 8 was released at the end of 2015, which means our community has had over two years of real-world experience with Drupal 8. It was time to take a step back and assess additional growth initiatives based on what we have learned so far.

In an effort to better understand the biggest hurdles facing Drupal adoption, we interviewed over 150 individuals around the world that hold different roles within the community. We talked to Drupal front-end and back-end developers, contributors, trainers, agency owners, vendors that sell Drupal to customers, end users, and more. Based on their feedback, we established four goals to help accelerate Drupal adoption.

Goal 1: Improve the technical evaluation process

Matthew Grasmick recently completed an exercise in which he assessed the technical evaluator experience of four different PHP frameworks, and discovered that Drupal required the most steps to install. Having a good technical evaluator experience is critical, as it has a direct impact on adoption rates.

To improve the Drupal evaluation process, we've proposed the following initiatives:
Initiative
Issue link
Stakeholders
Initiative coordinator
Status
Better discovery experience on Drupal.org
Drupal.org roadmap
Drupal Association
hestenet
Under active development
Better "getting started" documentation
#2956879
Documentation Working Group
grasmash
In planning
More modern administration experience
#2957457
Core contributors
ckrina and yoroy
Under active development
To become involved with one of these initiatives, click on its "Issue link" in the table above. This will take you to Drupal.org, where you can contribute by sharing your ideas or lending your expertise to move an initiative forward.

Goal 2: Improve the content creator experience

Throughout the interview process, it became clear that ease of use is a feature now expected of all technology. For Drupal, this means improving the content creator experience through a modern administration user interface, drag-and-drop media management and page building, and improved site preview functionality.

The good news is that all of these features are already under development through the Media, Workflow, Layout and JavaScript Modernization initiatives.

Most of these initiative teams meet weekly on Drupal Slack (see the meetings calendar), which gives community members an opportunity to meet team members, receive information on current goals and priorities, and volunteer to contribute code, testing, design, communications, and more.

Goal 3: Improve the site builder experience

Our research also showed that to improve the site builder experience, we should focus on improving the three following areas:
The configuration management capabilities in core need to support more common use cases out-of-the-box.
Composer and Drupal core should be better integrated to empower site builders to manage dependencies and keep Drupal sites up-to-date.
We should provide a longer grace period between required core updates so development teams have more time to prepare, test, and upgrade their Drupal sites after each new minor Drupal release.
We plan to make all of these aspects easier for site builders through the following initiatives:
Initiative
Issue link
Stakeholders
Initiative coordinator
Status
Composer & Core
#2958021
Core contributors + Drupal Association
Coordinator needed!
Proposed
Config Management 2.0
#2957423
Core contributors
Coordinator needed!
Proposed
Security LTS
2909665
Core committers + Drupal Security Team + Drupal Association
Core committers and Security team
Proposed, under discussion
Goal 4: Promote Drupal to non-technical decision makers

The fourth initiative is unique as it will help our community to better communicate the value of Drupal to the non-technical decision makers. Today, marketing executives and content creators often influence the decision behind what CMS an organization will use. However, many of these individuals are not familiar with Drupal or are discouraged by the misconception that Drupal is primarily for developers.

With these challenges in mind, the Drupal Association has launched the Promote Drupal Initiative. This initiative will include building stronger marketing and branding, demos, events, and public relations resources that digital agencies and local associations can use to promote Drupal. The Drupal Association has set a goal of fundraising $100,000 to support this initiative, including the hiring of a marketing coordinator.

Megan Sanicki and her team have already raised $54,000 from over 30 agencies and 5 individual sponsors in only 4 days. Clearly this initiative resonates with Drupal agencies. Please consider how you or your organization can contribute.

Fostering community with values and principles

This year at DrupalCon Nashville, over 3,000 people traveled to the Music City to collaborate, learn, and connect with one another. It's at events like DrupalCon where the impact of our community becomes tangible for many. It also serves as an important reminder that while Drupal has grown a great deal since the early days, the work needed to scale our community is never done.

Prompted by feedback from our community, I have spent the past five months trying to better establish the Drupal community's principles and values. I have shared an "alpha" version of Drupal's values and principles at https://www.drupal.org/about/values-and-principles. As a next step, I will be drafting a charter for a new working group that will be responsible for maintaining and improving our values and principles. In the meantime, I invite every community member to provide feedback in the issue queue of the Drupal governance project.

An overview of Drupal's values with supporting principles.I believe that taking time to highlight community members that exemplify each principle can make the proposed framework more accessible. That is why it was very meaningful for me to spotlight three Drupal community members that demonstrate these principles.

Principle 1: Optimize for Impact - Rebecca Pilcher

Rebecca shares a remarkable story about Drupal's impact on her Type 1 diabetes diagnosis:

Principle 5: Everyone has something to contribute - Mike Lamb

Mike explains why Pfizer contributes millions to Drupal:

Principle 6: Choose to Lead - Mark Conroy

Mark tells the story of his own Drupal journey, and how his experience inspired him to help other community members:

Watch the keynote or download my slides

In addition to the community spotlights, you can also watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 19:25), or you can download a copy of my slides (164 MB).


Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


State of Drupal presentation (April 2018)

© Yes Moon
Last week, I shared my State of Drupal presentation at Drupalcon Nashville. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide more information on how you can participate in the various initiatives presented in my keynote, such as growing Drupal adoption or evolving our community values and principles.
Drupal 8 update

During the first portion of my presentation, I provided an overview of Drupal 8 updates. Last month, the Drupal community celebrated an important milestone with the successful release of Drupal 8.5, which ships with improved features for content creators, site builders, and developers.

Drupal 8 continues to gain momentum, as the number of Drupal 8 sites has grown 51 percent year-over-year:

This graph depicts the number of Drupal 8 sites built since April 2015. Last year there were 159,000 sites and this year there are 241,000 sites, representing a 51% increase year-over-year.Drupal 8's module ecosystem is also maturing quickly, as 81 percent more Drupal 8 modules have become stable in the past year:

This graph depicts the number of modules now stable since January 2016. This time last year there were 1,028 stable projects and this year there are 1,860 stable projects, representing an 81% increase year-over-year.As you can see from the Drupal 8 roadmap, improving the ease of use for content creators remains our top priority:

This roadmap depicts Drupal 8.5, 8.6, and 8.7+, along with a column for "wishlist" items that are not yet formally slotted. The contents of this roadmap can be found at https://www.drupal.org/core/roadmap.Four ways to grow Drupal adoption

Drupal 8 was released at the end of 2015, which means our community has had over two years of real-world experience with Drupal 8. It was time to take a step back and assess additional growth initiatives based on what we have learned so far.

In an effort to better understand the biggest hurdles facing Drupal adoption, we interviewed over 150 individuals around the world that hold different roles within the community. We talked to Drupal front-end and back-end developers, contributors, trainers, agency owners, vendors that sell Drupal to customers, end users, and more. Based on their feedback, we established four goals to help accelerate Drupal adoption.

Goal 1: Improve the technical evaluation process

Matthew Grasmick recently completed an exercise in which he assessed the technical evaluator experience of four different PHP frameworks, and discovered that Drupal required the most steps to install. Having a good technical evaluator experience is critical, as it has a direct impact on adoption rates.

To improve the Drupal evaluation process, we've proposed the following initiatives:
Initiative
Issue link
Stakeholders
Initiative coordinator
Status
Better discovery experience on Drupal.org
Drupal.org roadmap
Drupal Association
hestenet
Under active development
Better "getting started" documentation
#2956879
Documentation Working Group
grasmash
In planning
More modern administration experience
#2957457
Core contributors
ckrina and yoroy
Under active development
To become involved with one of these initiatives, click on its "Issue link" in the table above. This will take you to Drupal.org, where you can contribute by sharing your ideas or lending your expertise to move an initiative forward.

Goal 2: Improve the content creator experience

Throughout the interview process, it became clear that ease of use is a feature now expected of all technology. For Drupal, this means improving the content creator experience through a modern administration user interface, drag-and-drop media management and page building, and improved site preview functionality.

The good news is that all of these features are already under development through the Media, Workflow, Layout and JavaScript Modernization initiatives.

Most of these initiative teams meet weekly on Drupal Slack (see the meetings calendar), which gives community members an opportunity to meet team members, receive information on current goals and priorities, and volunteer to contribute code, testing, design, communications, and more.

Goal 3: Improve the site builder experience

Our research also showed that to improve the site builder experience, we should focus on improving the three following areas:
The configuration management capabilities in core need to support more common use cases out-of-the-box.
Composer and Drupal core should be better integrated to empower site builders to manage dependencies and keep Drupal sites up-to-date.
We should provide a longer grace period between required core updates so development teams have more time to prepare, test, and upgrade their Drupal sites after each new minor Drupal release.
We plan to make all of these aspects easier for site builders through the following initiatives:
Initiative
Issue link
Stakeholders
Initiative coordinator
Status
Composer & Core
#2958021
Core contributors + Drupal Association
Coordinator needed!
Proposed
Config Management 2.0
#2957423
Core contributors
Coordinator needed!
Proposed
Security LTS
2909665
Core committers + Drupal Security Team + Drupal Association
Core committers and Security team
Proposed, under discussion
Goal 4: Promote Drupal to non-technical decision makers

The fourth initiative is unique as it will help our community to better communicate the value of Drupal to the non-technical decision makers. Today, marketing executives and content creators often influence the decision behind what CMS an organization will use. However, many of these individuals are not familiar with Drupal or are discouraged by the misconception that Drupal is primarily for developers.

With these challenges in mind, the Drupal Association has launched the Promote Drupal Initiative. This initiative will include building stronger marketing and branding, demos, events, and public relations resources that digital agencies and local associations can use to promote Drupal. The Drupal Association has set a goal of fundraising $100,000 to support this initiative, including the hiring of a marketing coordinator.

Megan Sanicki and her team have already raised $54,000 from over 30 agencies and 5 individual sponsors in only 4 days. Clearly this initiative resonates with Drupal agencies. Please consider how you or your organization can contribute.

Fostering community with values and principles

This year at DrupalCon Nashville, over 3,000 people traveled to the Music City to collaborate, learn, and connect with one another. It's at events like DrupalCon where the impact of our community becomes tangible for many. It also serves as an important reminder that while Drupal has grown a great deal since the early days, the work needed to scale our community is never done.

Prompted by feedback from our community, I have spent the past five months trying to better establish the Drupal community's principles and values. I have shared an "alpha" version of Drupal's values and principles at https://www.drupal.org/about/values-and-principles. As a next step, I will be drafting a charter for a new working group that will be responsible for maintaining and improving our values and principles. In the meantime, I invite every community member to provide feedback in the issue queue of the Drupal governance project.

An overview of Drupal's values with supporting principles.I believe that taking time to highlight community members that exemplify each principle can make the proposed framework more accessible. That is why it was very meaningful for me to spotlight three Drupal community members that demonstrate these principles.

Principle 1: Optimize for Impact - Rebecca Pilcher

Rebecca shares a remarkable story about Drupal's impact on her Type 1 diabetes diagnosis:

Principle 5: Everyone has something to contribute - Mike Lamb

Mike explains why Pfizer contributes millions to Drupal:

Principle 6: Choose to Lead - Mark Conroy

Mark tells the story of his own Drupal journey, and how his experience inspired him to help other community members:

Watch the keynote or download my slides

In addition to the community spotlights, you can also watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 19:25), or you can download a copy of my slides (164 MB).


Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


DrupalCoin Commerce 2.x: 2017 in review

Now that 2017 is over and we’re back from our well deserved holidays, it’s time to look at what the DrupalCoin Commerce community accomplished over the past year.

There is no doubt that DrupalCoin Commerce is one of the largest and most active projects in the DrupalCoin community. The #commerce channel is now the most active channel on the DrupalCoin Slack, with 550 members. Over a hundred modules have received contributions from several hundred contributors working for dozens of different agencies. Just a few months after the initial stable release, there are over 2000 reported installations with new case studies appearing every week!

Let’s take a closer look.


Source: Reposted from: drupalcommerce.org


23 Restaurant Marketing Tips & The Instagram Ads That Will Make You Drool

Let’s talk restaurants. Or, more specifically, let’s talk about social media restaurant marketing and Instagram Ads for restaurants. We talk a lot about business-to-consumer marketing (B2C), and while restaurants do technically fit that bill, they also are in a league of their own. They aren’t selling products that can be used several times, or even a Read more
Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


How To Use The Google Keyword Tool (And Slash Your Ad Spend)

The best keywords in your industry are too expensive. Sure, it’d be nice if you could just bid on those and be swimming in clients. But you can’t. At least not profitably. Advertisers are already engaged in bidding wars for them. And when that happens, you can expect your budget to get thin. Fast. But here’s the Read more
Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


The Updated Guide to Branded Content – 2017 Edition

Life moves pretty fast. What was once shiny and new quickly turns well worn and beaten, and there are few places where this is truer than in the world of advertising. When Facebook first launched its own branded content tool last year, we gave the blow by blows of why it was a blast from Read more
Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


Relevance Score: Everything You Need to Know in 2017 (Strategies Included)

In 2015, Facebook Ads Manager introduced a sweet new feature: the Relevance Score. If you ever wanted to tell at a glance how well your ad fits with its audience, the Relevance Score has you covered. The metric itself is simple: a score of 1-10—10 meaning that your target audience finds your ad super relevant to Read more
Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


The Best Times to Post on Instagram

If you follow our blog, you’ve probably seen a post or two about the best times to post on Facebook. This is a pretty common question, and it’s one marketers have been trying to answer through multiple algorithm changes and shifting usage of the social media site for years. A lot of the time, we’ll Read more
Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


Creating a Decoupled DrupalCoin Blockchain Application in 30 Minutes with Lightning, BLT, and DrupalCoin BlockchainVM

Overview
Brian Reese, Jason Enter, and Dane Powell, members of Acquia’s Professional Services team, recently released an open-source application that demonstrates how DrupalCoin Blockchain and Node.js can easily be paired to create beautiful and functional decoupled applications.
This demo application was split into two repositories: a DrupalCoin Blockchain-based backend (acting as a data provider) and the Node-based frontend. You can find a tutorial on how to try out this demo application yourself here, or follow the READMEs included in each repo.
The purpose of the current tutorial, however, is to illustrate how easy it was to create the DrupalCoin Blockchain backend using a combination of Acquia and DrupalCoin Blockchain community projects such as Lightning, BLT, and DrupalCoin BlockchainVM. This will allow you to follow the same process to rapidly create your own custom decoupled applications.
Understanding the components
Let’s start by briefly reviewing the open-source (read: free!) tools you will use in this tutorial.
Lightning
Lightning is a DrupalCoin Blockchain distribution that curates the best DrupalCoin Blockchain modules and patches to provide a great experience for editorial teams and developers out of the box. For our purposes, it’s most useful because it provides a preconfigured Content API feature, which automatically exposes a JSON-based REST API for content types, fields, media, and other entities.
Headless Lightning
Headless Lightning is a sub-profile of Lightning that includes all of the same features, but additionally provides a simplified administrative interface designed especially for decoupled sites, as well as editorial teams who might not be as comfortable with DrupalCoin Blockchain’s administrative patterns.

Lightning and Headless Lightning are each great choices for decoupled applications, since they share the common Content API feature. For the purposes of this tutorial, however, we will assume you are using Headless Lightning.
Simplified content authoring interface provided by Headless Lightning
BLT
BLT is a set of tools that will assist in creating a new project, as well as deploying and testing that project, using just a few simple commands. It automates many of the tedious tasks of spinning up a new project such as setting up a local environment, enforcing best practices, managing configuration, building a test framework, and setting up continuous integration.
BLT only works with DrupalCoin Blockchain 8, but it is completely agnostic as to which distribution or contributed packages you choose to use. By default, it will build new sites based on Lightning.
DrupalCoin BlockchainVM
DrupalCoin BlockchainVM is a Vagrant-based virtual integrationenvironment that makes it easy to set up a dedicated local integrationenvironment (including LAMP stack) for each of your DrupalCoin Blockchain projects.
Creating your application -- in Six Steps
1. Install the prerequisites for BLT and DrupalCoin BlockchainVM. We strongly recommend following this tutorial in a Unix-like environment (Mac OS or Linux). While all of these tools are generally compatible with Windows 10, there are some caveats, and the developer experience is going to be generally inferior to a native *nix environment.
2. Proceed to create a new project using BLT. BLT’s provided setup instruction should be comprehensive and self-explanatory, but we will duplicate them here for posterity. If you have any problems setting up the new project, review the BLT documentation or create an issue in the support queue.
Create a new project based on BLT by running the following command. We assume you will name the project “decoupled”, like ours:composer create-project --no-interaction acquia/blt-project decoupled
This will create a new DrupalCoin Blockchain codebase and local Git repository in a directory named “decoupled”. When it’s complete, you should see a message like this:
Restart your terminal session so that your shell detects the new BLT alias, then change directory to your new site, i.e.cd ~/sites/decoupled
All following steps assume that you are in this directory.
3. Set up your LAMP stack. We recommend using DrupalCoin BlockchainVM, but you can also follow the steps in the BLT instructions to configure your own LAMP stack if desired. Setting up a DrupalCoin BlockchainVM instance is as easy as running this command (this can take 10-20 minutes, go grab a coffee!):blt vm
Important: it’s best if the major version of PHP on your host machine matches the major version in the VM. Your DrupalCoin BlockchainVM instance will use PHP 5.6 by default. Thus, if you use PHP 7+ on your host, you should configure DrupalCoin BlockchainVM to also use PHP 7:
Edit box/config.yml
Change php_version to 7.0 or 7.1 to match your host.
Run vagrant provision
4. Download and install Headless Lightning:composer require acquia/headless_lightning:~1.1.0
This will place the Headless Lightning code at: docroot/profiles/contrib/headless_lightning
5. Tell BLT to install Headless Lightning by default by editing blt/project.yml and changing the project:profile:name key to: headless_lightning.
6. Finally, now that all of the code dependencies and your LAMP stack are in place, it’s time to install the site:blt setup
When you run this command, BLT will automatically make sure that composer dependencies are installed, configure your local settings, and install the Headless Lightning profile.
Congratulations
You should now have a functional decoupled DrupalCoin Blockchain application! You can log in by running this command in the root of your new `decoupled` repository:drush @decoupled.local uli
Future blog posts in this series will demonstrate how to create and populate a content model, how that content is exposed via JSON API, and how to integrate with front-end apps and deploy them to Acquia Cloud.
Source: http://dev.acquia.com/


How Much Does Google AdWords Cost? Here’s How To Create Your Budget

Investing in a PPC platform like Google AdWords can have a huge impact on your business. In fact, according to Google, the average advertiser on AdWords makes two dollars for every dollar they spend. That means the majority of people on the platform are doubling their investment. It all sounds nice in theory, right? But Read more
Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


Optimize Your Platform Performance with New Server Health Insights from Acquia Stack Metrics

Stack Metrics allows you to see the underlying health of your site infrastructure.
We want you to have the tools and data you need to make informed decisions. With Stack Metrics, you can gain insights into the health of your fleet and narrow down the possible causes of performance issues without contacting Acquia for help.
With Stack Metrics you can also better plan for your long-term needs by monitoring trends and preparing for eventual upsizes, rather than being surprised when performance and site health start to suffer because your infrastructure has reached its capacity limits.
In short, Stack Metrics allows you to work smarter and faster, which saves time and money, and helps you optimize the health of your applications and your fleets.
By keeping an eye on the underlying health of your infrastructure, you can more easily track trends and determine whether changes in application performance/availability (data usually found in an Uptime Monitoring service or APM) correlate to resource utilization or exhaustion on your instances.
Overall, Stack Metrics tracks more than twenty metrics, too many to list individually. But let’s go through the four major tiers of metrics.
LOAD BALANCING
The first metrics we show you in Stack Metrics focus on traffic patterns, since that is so often the cause of site performance and stability issues.
We allow you to see an analysis of request volumes on your infrastructure, then break down the cache hit rate we’ve detected.
Stack Metrics makes it easy to identify trends in traffic patterns and response codes.
The higher the cache hit rate, the more performant your site will be. We also summarize response code trends so that you can determine if your sites are generating too many 300, 400, or 500 responses in comparison to your rate of 200s (successful requests).
WEB TIER
Web Tier analytics show how many requests are reaching the backend servers after bypassing caching. PHP processes are the little workers that handle each request that hits the backend, so we’ve decided to expose this metric to help you assess their true web capacity.
Insights into Web Tier health can make it easy to spot anomalous behaviors and trends.
If you have clusters with multiple applications on them, you can see how many total processes are being used on each cluster, then compare that to how many a specific application is using by comparison.
This is useful for determining which are the most or least active applications you manage.
We also expose a metric that indicates PHP Process Exhaustion, a condition that can cause the site to slow down during periods of elevated traffic. Keeping an eye on this metric will allow you to determine if performance enhancements are needed or if you should consider requesting a proactive upsize prior to a planned high traffic event.
Cron memory utilization monitoring allows you to visualize the impact of your cron jobs. Often, cron jobs that attempt too much work, or which run too frequently, can cause site impairment or performance issues.
FILE SYSTEM / DATABASE
The main essential metric we expose to you on the database tier is Slow Query Count. This indicates that a database action took longer than one second to complete, which is unusual on most sites.
While relatively harmless in isolation, too many of these occurring at once can cause the site to slow down while the database tries to process all of the queries it has received.
Exposing this metric allows you to keep an eye out for a relatively silent performance killer that can often be eliminated with the help of a slow query log or an Application Performance Monitoring tool like New Relic.
We also expose File System and Database storage capacity and utilization metrics so that you can keep an eye on how quickly your file system or database storage is filling up and take action if you notice that it’s getting closer to capacity.
GENERAL
CPU/Memory utilization is shown at each layer of the stack so you can more readily assess if certain activities or times of day are more resource intensive than others. This is another common cause of intermittent performance/availability issues, and will help you determine if you need to upsize, optimize performance, or can otherwise safely downsize your infrastructure and reduce costs.
Further, out of Memory Errors are exposed as a warning sign that some aspect of your application is causing your instances to reach an “out of memory” state.
While these errors are known to happen from time to time, and usually only impact the specific process that needed too much memory, repeat occurrences can indicate the need for a performance audit by Acquia Support or additional server resources.
SUMMARY
We want you to have the tools and data you need to make informed decisions. We also want to empower you to be able to check into the health of your fleet, and narrow down the possible causes of performance issues on your own, without needing to contact Acquia.
Stack Metrics also heads off those sudden Surprise! realizations that you’ve reached a capacity limit. Instead you can be monitoring and preparing for upsizes long in advance.
The bottom line (literally): Stack Metrics allows you to work smarter and faster, optimize the health of your applications and your fleets, and save time and money.
If you are an Acquia Cloud customer, you can start using Stack Metrics today. Just sign in to the Acquia Cloud interface, select your application and environment, and click “Stack Metrics” in the left menu.
Not an Acquia Cloud customer? Learn more about this leading cloud platform that enables you to continuously develop, deliver, and run digital experience applications and content.
Source: http://dev.acquia.com/


Google Adwords And Analytics — The Perfect Pair!

Google AdWords is great at giving you raw data like costs, clicks, impressions, and conversions. You can see directly how well a keyword or campaign is performing for your business. But what happens in between a click and a conversion? How did they interact with your site and landing page? What stopped them or convinced them to convert Read more
Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


Project Empathy: the Hows and Whys

When I became a project manager some ten years ago, my career mentor told me that to be successful, a project manager needs to be “empathetic.”
I did not pay much attention to his advice at the time, but now I realize that being empathetic towards a project allows a manager to overcome many challenges she might face in the course of launching a particular project or product. Here’s my take on how to achieve “Project Empathy” and why it is important.
What is Project Empathy?
Having empathy for a project sounds odd, but it’s a useful idea. It means treating a project as if it were a living thing, with feelings and emotions.
Think about it: a project is made up of its team. If the bond among team members is high, the overall emotional quotient of team will be high too -- and as a PM, your task will be half done.
Here's an example from my career, quoting from my journal:
Was working on a Facebook application for a client. My team was fairly new. Project & team were nervous around its implementation. This is when I knew that I needed to jump in, understand the tone of project, and its demands. For me, it was like taking care of a friend who is undergoing rough patch. And we actually came out with flying colors as it was amongst our most sought-after case studies later.
This approach might sound unconventional, but this way of thinking can be a real help for a project manager and her entire team. The manager can go forward with a more conventional approach and still be successful, but in my experience “Project Empathy” raises the chances of bringing a project to successful conclusion. It not only instills team enthusiasm but also creates an overall atmosphere of collaboration.
In one of my latest projects’ initial days, I could sense the conflicts amongst technical folks. The team was feeling choked and could not speak up. This was not only affecting the productivity but also the quality of project too. I took the team members out individually over coffee, tried to understand their blockers in detail, cleared a few of them and acknowledged the hard work they were putting in. This not only instilled enthusiasm, but also the results were right there in front of me, as we were able to pull it off before the deadline. This project was the first where I first experimented with having a few stand-ups over coffee. Such unconventional approaches definitely keep the project pulse normal.
Before the project begins, have faith
The project manager is the main pillar of any project. She must have faith in herself, her team, and an understanding of why the project is being started. Whether the project is small or big, if the project manager doesn’t believe in its importance, she won’t be able to make her team believe in it either.
Value the project and make others value it too
At any project’s launch, the project manager needs to understand its objectives—and also its “needs and desires.”
What does a project desire? It usually wants good communication, transparency, collaboration, trust, and -- above all -- enthusiasm that we will cross this as one, whatever comes.
The functional, objective part is a given, but Project Empathy deals with the emotional part. We are considering the project as a living thing, almost human. Just like a person, a project must “feel” important, and the team must treat it that way.
To deal with the project’s requirements, the team needs to understand how valuable the project is, and what hopes and dreams it has. Each team member on the project needs to be aligned on the holistic outcome from the project. This not only motivates them, but also let them know that they are part of something meaningful instead of just few lines of code. Once the team understands this, they will make the right decisions and meaningful choices. There have been instances when my junior-most team members shared their observations before actual implementation. And when I raised these with the client, they liked the whole approach. This would not have been possible, if during kick-off calls, I would not have invited full team and aligned them with the intent of doing that project.
Stay enthusiastic. Don’t lose hope!
Throughout the project, the project manager must maintain enthusiasm, for herself and for her team. The group must continue to talk about the project’s importance and keep Project Empathy at the top of their minds. This lays the foundation for when the team begins to lose faith or gets tired. When enthusiasm starts to dry up, the project manager must repeat the same words to herself, and to the team, and not allow small obstacles to stop them from creating something that will be a source of great pride. She may even take the team out and acknowledge the good work they are doing on project so far.
Expect dark times but stay empathetic
There will often be times when a project seems to be slipping: there’s a budget cut, or a change in stakeholders, or a timeline shift. This is the time for Project Empathy to come into action! These instances might discourage the team, and the project manager might herself start to feel less enthusiastic about the project. That is when she needs to remind her team why they started the project in the first place, to recall its value that was evident during the earlier better days. She has to remind herself and her to have “empathy” for the project.
It might be hard to empathize with the project instead of the aligning with the dissatisfaction that the team is feeling. The project manager might find herself in the trap of complaining alongside her teammates about how awful things are, about the cuts in the timeline, and other annoying changes. It becomes easier to harbor those wearisome thoughts, especially when she has to ask the team for unpleasant favors, say, working on a weekend. She might find herself wishing that the project ends soon so she won’t have to worry about it anymore. But that sort of thinking only sabotages the project and makes the teammates feel even worse about finishing their work.
Once the manager thinks of the project as a living thing, she won’t want to stay on negative thoughts or complain to her team. This is where the essence of Project Empathy lies.
An empathetic manager gains more attention from her teammates. Many productivity issues get resolved when the team finds they have a manager who works on their concerns and understands them. An empathetic PM always instills a sense of accountability and ownership among her team members. With each project event, all stakeholders will find themselves more invested in the project. Overall relationships improve, and teammates feel attached to working on the project.
Developing Project Empathy is a skill that evolves with experience, over time, but it can result in people with very different personalities working together in the best possible way.
Source: http://dev.acquia.com/


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