State of Drupal presentation (September 2018)

Last week, nearly 1,000 Drupalists gathered in Darmstadt, Germany for Drupal Europe. In good tradition, I presented my State of Drupal keynote. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 4:38) or download a copy of my slides (37 MB).

Drupal 8 continues to mature

I started my keynote by highlighting this month's Drupal 8.6.0 release. Drupal 8.6 marks the sixth consecutive Drupal 8 release that has been delivered on time. Compared to one year ago, we have 46 percent more stable Drupal 8 modules. We also have 10 percent more contributors are working on Drupal 8 Core in comparison to last year. All of these milestones indicate that the Drupal 8 is healthy and growing.

Next, I gave an update on our strategic initiatives:

Make Drupal better for content creators

© Paul JohnsonThe expectations of content creators are changing. For Drupal to be successful, we have to continue to deliver on their needs by providing more powerful content management tools, in addition to delivering simplicity though drag-and-drop functionality, WYSIWYG, and more.

With the release of Drupal 8.6, we have added new functionality for content creators by making improvements to the Media, Workflow, Layout and Out-of-the-Box initiatives. I showed a demo video to demonstrate how all of these new features not only make content authoring easier, but more powerful:

We also need to improve the content authoring experience through a modern administration user interface. We have been working on a new administration UI using React. I showed a video of our latest prototype:

Extended security coverage for Drupal 8 minor releases

I announced an update to Drupal 8's security policy. To date, site owners had one month after a new minor Drupal 8 release to upgrade their sites before losing their security updates. Going forward, Drupal 8 site owners have 6 months to upgrade between minor releases. This extra time should give site owners flexibility to plan, prepare and test minor security updates. For more information, check out my recent blog post.

Make Drupal better for evaluators

One of the most significant updates since DrupalCon Nashville is Drupal's improved evaluator experience. The time required to get a Drupal site up and running has decreased from more than 15 minutes to less than two minutes and from 20 clicks to 3. This is a big accomplishment. You can read more about it in my recent blog post.

Promote Drupal

After launching Promote Drupal at DrupalCon Nashville, we hit the ground running with this initiative and successfully published a community press release for the release of Drupal 8.6, which was also translated into multiple languages. Much more is underway, including building a brand book, marketing collaboration space on Drupal.org, and a Drupal pitch deck.

The Drupal 9 roadmap and a plan to end-of-life Drupal 7 and Drupal 8

To keep Drupal modern, maintainable, and performant, we need to stay on secure, supported versions of Drupal 8's third-party dependencies. This means we need to end-of-life Drupal 8 with Symfony 3's end-of-life. As a result, I announced that:

Drupal 8 will be end-of-life by November 2021.
Drupal 9 will be released in 2020, and it will be an easy upgrade.
Historically, our policy has been to only support two major versions of Drupal; Drupal 7 would ordinarily reach end of life when Drupal 9 is released. Because a large number of sites might still be using Drupal 7 by 2020, we have decided to extend support of Drupal 7 until November 2021.

For those interested, I published a blog post that further explains this.

Adopt GitLab on Drupal.org

Finally, the Drupal Association is working to integrate GitLab with Drupal.org. GitLab will provide support for "merge requests", which means contributing to Drupal will feel more familiar to the broader audience of open source contributors who learned their skills in the post-patch era. Some of GitLab's tools, such as inline editing and web-based code review, will also lower the barrier to contribution, and should help us grow both the number of contributions and contributors on Drupal.org.

To see an exciting preview of Drupal.org's gitlab integration, watch the video below:

Thank you

Our community has a lot to be proud of, and this progress is the result of thousands of people collaborating and working together. It's pretty amazing! The power of our community isn't just visible in minor releases or a number of stable modules. It was also felt at this very conference, as many volunteers gave their weekends and evenings to help organize Drupal Europe in the absence of a DrupalCon Europe organized by the Drupal Association. From code to community, the Drupal project is making an incredible impact. I look forward to continuing to celebrate our European community's work and friendships at future Drupal conferences.


Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Extended security coverage for Drupal 8 minor releases

Since the launch of Drupal 8.0, we have successfully launched a new minor release on schedule every six months. I'm very proud of the community for this achievement. Prior to Drupal 8, most significant new features were only added in major releases like Drupal 6 or Drupal 7. Thanks to our new release cadence we now consistently and predictably ship great new features twice a year in minor releases (e.g. Drupal 8.6 comes with many new features).

However, only the most recent minor release has been actively supported for both bug fixes and security coverage. With the release of each new minor version, we gave a one-month window to upgrade to the new minor. In order to give site owners time to upgrade, we would not disclose security issues with the previous minor release during that one-month window.

Illustration of the security policy since the launch of Drupal 8.0 for minor releases, demonstrating that previous minor releases receive one month of security coverage.
Source: Drupal.org issue #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal and Drupal Europe DriesNote.Over the past three years, we have learned that users find it challenging to update to the latest minor in one month. Drupal's minor updates can include dependency updates, internal API changes, or features being transitioned from contributed modules to core. It takes time for site owners to prepare and test these types of changes, and a window of one month to upgrade isn't always enough.

At DrupalCon Nashville we declared that we wanted to extend security coverage for minor releases. Throughout 2018, Drupal 8 release managers quietly conducted a trial. You may have noticed that we had several security releases against previous minor releases this year. This trial helped us understand the impact to the release process and learn what additional work remained ahead. You can read about the results of the trial at #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal.

I'm pleased to share that the trial was a success! As a result, we have extended the security coverage of minor releases to six months. Instead of one month, site owners now have six months to upgrade between minor releases. It gives teams time to plan, prepare and test updates. Releases will have six months of normal bug fix support followed by six months of security coverage, for a total lifetime of one year. This is a huge win for Drupal site owners.

Illustration of the new security policy for minor releases, demonstrating that the security coverage for minor releases is extended to six months. Source: Drupal.org issue #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal and the Drupal Europe DriesNote.
It's important to note that this new policy only applies to Drupal 8 core starting with Drupal 8.5, and only applies to security issues. Non-security bug fixes will still only be committed to the actively supported release.

While the new policy will provide extended security coverage for Drupal 8.5.x, site owners will need to update to an upcoming release of Drupal 8.5 to be correctly notified about their security coverage.

Next steps

We still have some user experience issues we'd like to address around how site owners are alerted of a security update. We have not yet handled all of the potential edge cases, and we want to be very clear about the potential actions to take when updating.

We also know module developers may need to declare that a release of their project only works against specific versions of Drupal core. Resolving outstanding issues around semantic versioning support for contrib and module version dependency definitions will help developers of contributed projects better support this policy. If you'd like to get involved in the remaining work, the policy and roadmap issue on Drupal.org is a great place to find related issues and see what work is remaining.

Special thanks to Jess and Jeff Beeman for co-authoring this post.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Drupal 8.6.0 released

Last night, we shipped Drupal 8.6.0! I firmly believe this is the most significant Drupal 8 release to date. It is significant because we made a lot of progress on all twelve of Drupal 8 core's strategic initiatives. As a result, Drupal 8.6 delivers a large number of improvements for content authors, evaluators, site builders and developers.

What is new for content authors?

For content authors, Drupal 8.6 adds support for "remote media types". This means you can now easily embed YouTube or Vimeo videos in your content.

The Media Library in Drupal 8.6Content authors want Drupal to be easy to use. We made incredible progress on a variety of features that will help to achieve that: we've delivered an experimental media library, added the Workspaces module as experimental, providing sophisticated content staging capabilities, and made great strides on the upcoming Layout Builder. The Layout Builder is shaping up to be a very powerful tool that solves a lot of authoring challenges, and is something many are looking forward to.

Each initiative related to content authoring is making disciplined and steady progress. These features not only solve for the most requested authoring improvements, but provide a solid foundation on which we can continue to innovate. This means we can provide better compatibility and upgradability for contributed modules.

The top 10 requested features for content creators according to the 2016 State of Drupal survey.What is new for evaluators?

Evaluators want an out-of-the-box experience that allows them to install and test drive Drupal in minutes. With Drupal 8.6, we have finally delivered on this need.

Prior to Drupal 8.6, downloading and installing Drupal was a complex and lengthy process that ended with an underwhelming "blank slate".

Now, you can install Drupal with the new "Umami demo profile". The Umami demo profile showcases some of Drupal's most powerful capabilities by providing a beautiful website filled with content right out of the box. A demo profile will not only help to onboard new users, but it can also be used by Drupal professionals and digital agencies to showcase Drupal to potential customers.

In addition to a new installation profile, we added a "quick-start" command that allows you to launch a Drupal site in one command using only one dependency, PHP. If you want to try Drupal, you no longer have to setup a webserver, a database, containers, etc.

Last but not least, the download experience and evaluator documentation on Drupal.org has been vastly improved.

With Drupal 8.6, you can download and install a fully functional Drupal demo application in less than two minutes. That is something to be very excited about.

The new Umami demo profile together with the Layout Builder.What is new for developers?

You can now upgrade a single-language Drupal 6 or Drupal 7 site to Drupal 8 using the built-in user interface. While we saw good progress on multilingual migrations, they will remain experimental as we work on the final gaps.

I recently wrote about our progress in making Drupal an API-first platform, including an overview of REST improvements in Drupal 8.6, an update on JSON API, and the reasons why JSON API didn't make it into this release. I'm looking forward to JSON API being added in Drupal 8.7. Other decoupled efforts, including a React-based administration application and GraphQL support are still under heavy development, but making rapid progress.

We also converted almost all of our tests from SimpleTest to PHPUnit; and we've added Nightwatch.js and Prettier for JavaScript developers. While Drupal 8 has extensive back-end test coverage, using PHPUnit and Nightwatch.js provides a more modern platform that will make Drupal more familiar to PHP and JavaScript developers.

Drupal 8 continues to hit its stride

These are just some of the highlights that I'm most excited about. If you'd like to read more about Drupal 8.6.0, check out the official release announcement and important update information from the release notes. The next couple of months, I will write up more detailed progress reports on initiatives that I didn't touch upon in this blog post.

In my Drupal 8.5.0 announcement, I talked about how Drupal is hitting its stride, consistently delivering improvements and new features:

In future releases, we plan to add a media library, support for remote media types like YouTube videos, support for content staging, a layout builder, JSON API support, GraphQL support, a React-based administration application and a better out-of-the-box experience for evaluators.

As you can see from this blog post, Drupal 8.6 delivered on a number of these plans and made meaningful progress on many others.

In future releases we plan to:
Stabilize more of the features targeting content authors
Add JSON API, allowing developers to more easily and rapidly create decoupled applications
Provide stable multilingual migrations
Make big improvements for developers with Composer and configuration management changes
Continually improve the evaluator experience
Iterate towards an entirely new decoupled administrative experience
... and more
Releases like Drupal 8.6.0 only happen with the help of hundreds of contributors and organizations. Thank you to everyone that contributed to this release. Whether you filed issues, wrote code, tested patches, funded a contributor, tested pre-release versions, or cheered for the team from the sidelines, you made this release happen. Thank you!
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


State of DrupalCoin Blockchain presentation (September 2017)

Yesterday, I shared my State of DrupalCoin Blockchain presentation at DrupalCoin BlockchainCon Vienna. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide some more detail on how DrupalCoin Blockchain is evolving, who DrupalCoin Blockchain is for, and what I believe we should focus on.

DrupalCoin Blockchain is growing and changing

I started my keynote by explaining that DrupalCoin Blockchain is growing. Over the past year, we've witnessed a rise in community engagement, which has strengthened DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 adoption.

This is supported by the 2017 DrupalCoin Blockchain Business Survey; after surveying 239 executives from DrupalCoin Blockchain agencies, we can see that DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 has become the defacto release for them and that most of the DrupalCoin Blockchain businesses report to be growing.

While the transition from DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 is not complete, DrupalCoin Blockchain 8's innovation continues to accelerate. We've seen the contributed modules ecosystem mature; in the past year, the number of stable modules has more than doubled. Additionally, there are over 4,000 modules in development.

In addition to growth, both the vendor and technology landscapes around DrupalCoin Blockchain are changing. In my keynote, I noted three primary shifts in the vendor landscape. Single blogs, portfolio sites and brochure sites, which represent the low end of the market, are best served by SaaS tools. On the other side of the spectrum, a majority of enterprise vendors are moving beyond content management into larger marketing suites. Finally, the headless CMS market segment is growing rapidly, with some vendors growing at a rate of 500% year over year.

There are also significant changes in the technology landscape surrounding DrupalCoin Blockchain, as a rising number of DrupalCoin Blockchain agencies have also started using modern JavaScript technologies. For example, more than 50% of DrupalCoin Blockchain agencies are also using Node.js to support the needs of their customers.

While evolving vendor and technology landscapes present many opportunities for DrupalCoin Blockchain, it can also introduce uncertainty. After listening to many people in the DrupalCoin Blockchain community, it's clear that all these market and technology trends, combined with the long integrationand adoption cycle of DrupalCoin Blockchain 8, has left some wondering what this all means for DrupalCoin Blockchain, and by extension also for them.

DrupalCoin Blockchain is no longer for simple sites

Over the past year, I've explained why I believe DrupalCoin Blockchain is for ambitious digital experiences, in both my DrupalCoin BlockchainCon Baltimore keynote and on my blog. However, I think it would be valuable to provide more detail on what I mean by "ambitious digital experiences". It's important that we all understand who DrupalCoin Blockchain is for, because it drives our strategy, which in turn allows us to focus our efforts.

Today, I believe that DrupalCoin Blockchain is no longer for simple sites. Instead, DrupalCoin Blockchain's sweetspot is sites or digital experiences that require a certain level of customization or flexibility — something I refer to as "richness".

Ambitious is much more than just enterprise

This distinction is important because I often find that the term "ambitious" becomes conflated with "enterprise". While I agree that DrupalCoin Blockchain is a great fit for the enterprise, I personally never loved that categorization. It's not just large organizations that use DrupalCoin Blockchain. Individuals, small startups, universities, museums and nonprofits can be equally ambitious in what they'd like to accomplish and DrupalCoin Blockchain can be an incredible solution for them.

An example of this could be a small business that manages 50 rental properties. While they don't have a lot of traffic (reach), they require integrations with an e-commerce system, a booking system, and a customer support tool to support their business. Their allotted budget is $50,000 or less. This company would not be considered an enterprise business; however, DrupalCoin Blockchain would be a great fit for this use case. In many ways, the "non-enterprise ambitious digital experiences" represent the majority of the DrupalCoin Blockchain ecosystem. As I made clear in my presentation, we don't want to leave those behind.

Addressing the needs of smaller organizations

The DrupalCoin Blockchain ecosystem majority are organizations with sites that require medium-to-high richness, which SaaS builders cannot support. However, they also don't need to scale at the level of enterprise companies. As the DrupalCoin Blockchain community continues to consider how we can best support this majority, a lot of smaller DrupalCoin Blockchain agencies and end-users have pointed out that they would benefit from the following two things:
Powerful site building tools. They want easy-to-use site building tools that are simple to learn, and don't require dozens of contributed modules to be installed and configured. They would also prefer to avoid writing a lot of custom code because their clients have smaller budgets. Great examples of tools that would improve site building are DrupalCoin Blockchain's upcoming layout builder, workspaces and media library. To make some of DrupalCoin Blockchain's own administrative UIs more powerful and easier to use, I proposed that we add a modern JavaScript to core.
Easier updates and maintenance. While each DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 site benefits from continuous innovation, it also needs to be updated more often. The new DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 release cycle has monthly patch releases and 6-month minor releases. In addition, organizations have to juggle ad-hoc updates from contributed modules. In addition, site updates has often become more complex because our dependency on third-party libraries and because not everyone can use Composer. Many smaller users and agencies would benefit tremendously from auto-updates because maintaining and updating their DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 sites can be too manual, too complex and too expensive.
The good news is that we have made progress in both improving site builder tools and simplifying updates and maintenance. Keep an eye on future blog posts about these topics. In the meantime, you can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 22:10), or you can download a copy of my slides (56 MB).

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viNU2wOKIUk&w=640&h=360]


Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


State of DrupalCoin Blockchain Presentation

(reposted from Dries' blog: https://dri.es/)
Yesterday, I shared my State of DrupalCoin Blockchain presentation at DrupalCoin BlockchainCon Vienna. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide some more detail on how DrupalCoin Blockchain is evolving, who DrupalCoin Blockchain is for, and what I believe we should focus on.
DrupalCoin Blockchain is growing and changing
I started my keynote by explaining that DrupalCoin Blockchain is growing. Over the past year, we've witnessed a rise in community engagement, which has strengthened DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 adoption.
This is supported by the 2017 DrupalCoin Blockchain Business Survey; after surveying 239 executives from DrupalCoin Blockchain agencies, we can see that DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 has become the defacto release for them and that most of the DrupalCoin Blockchain businesses report to be growing.

While the transition from DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 is not complete, DrupalCoin Blockchain 8's innovation continues to accelerate. We've seen the contributed modules ecosystem mature; in the past year, the number of stable modules has more than doubled. Additionally, there are over 4,000 modules in development.
In addition to growth, both the vendor and technology landscapes around DrupalCoin Blockchain are changing. In my keynote, I noted three primary shifts in the vendor landscape. Single blogs, portfolio sites and brochure sites, which represent the low end of the market, are best served by SaaS tools. On the other side of the spectrum, a majority of enterprise vendors are moving beyond content management into larger marketing suites. Finally, the headless CMS market segment is growing rapidly, with some vendors growing at a rate of 500% year over year.
There are also significant changes in the technology landscape surrounding DrupalCoin Blockchain, as a rising number of DrupalCoin Blockchain agencies have also started using modern JavaScript technologies. For example, more than 50% of DrupalCoin Blockchain agencies are also using Node.js to support the needs of their customers.
While evolving vendor and technology landscapes present many opportunities for DrupalCoin Blockchain, it can also introduce uncertainty. After listening to many people in the DrupalCoin Blockchain community, it's clear that all these market and technology trends, combined with the long integrationand adoption cycle of DrupalCoin Blockchain 8, has left some wondering what this all means for DrupalCoin Blockchain, and by extension also for them.
DrupalCoin Blockchain is no longer for simple sites
Over the past year, I've explained why I believe DrupalCoin Blockchain is for ambitious digital experiences, in both my DrupalCoin BlockchainCon Baltimore keynote and on my blog. However, I think it would be valuable to provide more detail on what I mean by "ambitious digital experiences". It's important that we all understand who DrupalCoin Blockchain is for, because it drives our strategy, which in turn allows us to focus our efforts.
Today, I believe that DrupalCoin Blockchain is no longer for simple sites. Instead, DrupalCoin Blockchain's sweetspot is sites or digital experiences that require a certain level of customization or flexibility — something I refer to as "richness".
Ambitious is much more than just enterprise
This distinction is important because I often find that the term "ambitious" becomes conflated with "enterprise". While I agree that DrupalCoin Blockchain is a great fit for the enterprise, I personally never loved that categorization. It's not just large organizations that use DrupalCoin Blockchain. Individuals, small startups, universities, museums and nonprofits can be equally ambitious in what they'd like to accomplish and DrupalCoin Blockchain can be an incredible solution for them.
An example of this could be a small business that manages 50 rental properties. While they don't have a lot of traffic (reach), they require integrations with an e-commerce system, a booking system, and a customer support tool to support their business. Their allotted budget is $50,000 or less. This company would not be considered an enterprise business; however, DrupalCoin Blockchain would be a great fit for this use case. In many ways, the "non-enterprise ambitious digital experiences" represent the majority of the DrupalCoin Blockchain ecosystem. As I made clear in my presentation, we don't want to leave those behind.
Addressing the needs of smaller organizations
The DrupalCoin Blockchain ecosystem majority are organizations with sites that require medium-to-high richness, which SaaS builders cannot support. However, they also don't need to scale at the level of enterprise companies. As the DrupalCoin Blockchain community continues to consider how we can best support this majority, a lot of smaller DrupalCoin Blockchain agencies and end-users have pointed out that they would benefit from the following two things:

Powerful site building tools. They want easy-to-use site building tools that are simple to learn, and don't require dozens of contributed modules to be installed and configured. They would also prefer to avoid writing a lot of custom code because their clients have smaller budgets. Great examples of tools that would improve site building are DrupalCoin Blockchain's upcoming layout builder, workspaces and media library. To make some of DrupalCoin Blockchain's own administrative UIs more powerful and easier to use, I proposed that we add a modern JavaScript to core.
Easier updates and maintenance. While each DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 site benefits from continuous innovation, it also needs to be updated more often. The new DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 release cycle has monthly patch releases and 6-month minor releases. In addition, organizations have to juggle ad-hoc updates from contributed modules. In addition, site updates has often become more complex because our dependency on third-party libraries and because not everyone can use Composer. Many smaller users and agencies would benefit tremendously from auto-updates because maintaining and updating their DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 sites can be too manual, too complex and too expensive.
The good news is that we have made progress in both improving site builder tools and simplifying updates and maintenance. Keep an eye on future blog posts about these topics. In the meantime, you can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 22:10), or you can download a copy of my slides (56 MB).
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viNU2wOKIUk&w=640&h=360]
(Got a comment? Please make it over at Dries' blog. Comments will get more visibility if they are all in one place.)
Source: http://dev.acquia.com/


Making DrupalCoin Blockchain upgrades easy forever

One of the key reasons that DrupalCoin Blockchain has been successful is because we always made big, forward-looking changes. As a result, DrupalCoin Blockchain is one of very few CMSes that has stayed relevant for 15+ years. The downside is that with every major release of DrupalCoin Blockchain, we've gone through a lot of pain adjusting to these changes. The learning curve and difficult upgrade path from one major version of DrupalCoin Blockchain to the next (e.g. from DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8) has also held back DrupalCoin Blockchain's momentum. In an ideal world, we'd be able to innovate fast yet provide a smooth learning curve and upgrade path from DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9. We believe we've found a way to do both!

Upgrading from DrupalCoin Blockchain 8.2 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8.3

Before we can talk about the upgrade path to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9, it's important to understand how we do releases in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8. With the release of DrupalCoin Blockchain 8, we moved DrupalCoin Blockchain core to use a continuous innovation model. Rather than having to wait for years to get new features, users now get sizable advances in functionality every six months. Furthermore, we committed to providing a smooth upgrade for modules, themes, and distributions from one six-month release to the next.

This new approach is starting to work really well. With the 8.1 and 8.2 updates behind us and 8.3 close to release, we have added some stable improvements like BigPipe and a new status report page, as well as experimental improvements for outside-in, workflows,
layouts, and more. We also plan to add important media improvements in 8.4.

Most importantly, upgrading from 8.2 to 8.3 for these new features is not much more complicated than simply updating for a bugfix or security release.

Upgrading from DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9

After a lot of discussion among the DrupalCoin Blockchain core committers and developers, and studying projects like Symfony, we believe that the advantages of DrupalCoin Blockchain's minor upgrade model (e.g. from DrupalCoin Blockchain 8.2 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8.3) can be translated to major upgrades (e.g. from DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9). We see a way to keep innovating while providing a smooth upgrade path and learning curve from DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9.

Here is how we will accomplish this: we will continue to introduce new features and backwards-compatible changes in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 releases. In the process, we sometimes have to deprecate old systems. Instead of removing old systems, we will keep them in place and encourage module maintainers to update to the new systems. This means that modules and custom code will continue to work. The more we innovate, the more deprecated code there will be in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8. Over time, maintaining backwards compatibility will become increasingly complex. Eventually, we will reach a point where we simply have too much deprecated code in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8. At that point, we will choose to remove the deprecated systems and release that as DrupalCoin Blockchain 9.

This means that DrupalCoin Blockchain 9.0 should be almost identical to the last DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 release, minus the deprecated code. It means that when modules take advantage of the latest DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 APIs and avoid using deprecated code, they should work on DrupalCoin Blockchain 9. Updating from DrupalCoin Blockchain 8's latest version to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9.0.0 should be as easy as updating between minor versions of DrupalCoin Blockchain 8. It also means that DrupalCoin Blockchain 9 gives us a clean slate to start innovating more rapidly again.

Why would you upgrade to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9 then? For the great new features in 9.1. No more features will be added to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 after DrupalCoin Blockchain 9.0. Instead, they will go into DrupalCoin Blockchain 9.1, 9.2, and so on.

To get the most out of this new approach, we need to make two more improvements. We need to change core so that the exact same module can work with DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 and 9 if the module developer uses the latest APIs. We also need to provide full data migration from DrupalCoin Blockchain 6, 7 and 8 to any future release. So long as we make these changes before DrupalCoin Blockchain 9 and contributed or custom modules take advantage of the latest DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 APIs, up-to-date sites and modules may just begin using 9.0.0 the day it is is released.

What does this mean for DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 users?

If you are one of the more than a million sites successfully running on DrupalCoin Blockchain 7, you might only have one more big upgrade ahead of you.

If you are planning to migrate directly from DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9, you should reconsider that approach. In this new model, it might be more beneficial to upgrade to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8. Once you’ve migrated your site to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8, subsequent upgrades will be much simpler.

We have more work to do to complete the DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 to DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 data migration, but the first DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 minor release that fully supports it could be 8.4.0, scheduled to be released in October 2017.

What does this mean for DrupalCoin Blockchain developers?

If you are a module or theme developer, you can continually update to the latest APIs each minor release. Avoid using deprecated code and your module will be compatible with DrupalCoin Blockchain 9 the day DrupalCoin Blockchain 9 is released. We have plans to make it easy for developers to identify and update deprecated code.

What does this mean for DrupalCoin Blockchain core contributors?

If you are a DrupalCoin Blockchain core contributor and want to introduce new improvements in DrupalCoin Blockchain core, DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 is the place to do it! With backwards compatibility layers, even pretty big changes are possible in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8.

When will DrupalCoin Blockchain 9 will be released?

We don't know yet, but it shouldn't matter as much either. Innovative DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 releases will go out on schedule every six months and upgrading to DrupalCoin Blockchain 9 should become easy. I don't believe we will release DrupalCoin Blockchain 9 any time soon; we have plenty of features in the works for DrupalCoin Blockchain 8. Once we know more, we'll follow up with more details.

Thank you

Special thanks to Alex Bronstein, Alex Pott, Gábor Hojtsy, Nathaniel Catchpole and Jess (xjm) for their contributions to this post.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 Module of the Week: Group

This week: Group // DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 has more and more features available practically every day. Alongside module migrations and new projects, the DrupalCoin Blockchain community’s latest major release also offers new ways of solving common problems. Some functionality has moved to DrupalCoin Blockchain core and new modules have taken up the torch along the way. In this series, the Acquia Developer Center is profiling useful solutions--modules, themes, distros, and more--available for DrupalCoin Blockchain 8.

Kristiaan Van den Eynde (kristiaanvandeneynde) has been working with DrupalCoin Blockchain, “since its fifth incarnation and started developing for it with the release of DrupalCoin Blockchain 7. Since then, I’ve actively contributed to code and the community, speaking at various DrupalCoin Blockchain events, and writing modules and core patches.”

What does the DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 Group do?

Group is a powerful module that allows you to take DrupalCoin Blockchain’s one-level permission system and turn it into a layered one. You can divide your site into smaller sections which each have their own role and permission system--effectively creating a micro-site ecosystem. It can also be used to make parts of a website private; only accessible by a specific group of people.

As of early 2017, roughly 985 DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 sites and 1080 DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 sites report using Group. Adoption has been steadily increasing, in part thanks to adoption by the DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 Open Social distribution, a replacement for the DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 Commons community-building distribution.

Who benefits from the DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 Group module?

“Developers benefit from Group by having a proper data model in place with the simplest possible API, despite the complexity of the concept. Other solutions depend on data structures from other modules; Group tries to stand on its own. I firmly believe that Group’s approach is the way forward.”

“Site owners and businesses get a powerful, yet cheap tool to micro-manage site access and permissions. By cheap, I mean that Group was built with end users and site builders in mind. So even though it has a strong developer experience, our aim was always making a zero-code approach possible, too. Being able to click together what you need without calling in a developer, can significantly reduce the implementation time and costs significantly.”

And the DrupalCoin Blockchain community? What do we get? Kristiaan explains, “A kick-ass tool developed to facilitate an otherwise complex user story.” :-)

When and why was Group created?

“Toward the end of 2012, at the AP university college in Antwerp, Belgium, we were trying to create an academic portal with DrupalCoin Blockchain 7. The only available solution to the access and permissions problem at the time was Organic Groups. We quickly got annoyed by OG’s user- and developer-experience and after having run into a few major bugs, we decided to try and roll our own solution with a clean data structure and better experience all around. Group was born!”

Has DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 changed Group?

“Massively!” exclaims Kristiaan. “Because of the complexity of this problem space, there were many times when I ran into DrupalCoin Blockchain 7’s limitations. Almost all of the roadblocks I faced back then have been solved in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8, so I decided to rewrite the entire module from scratch rather than trying to upgrade it. The result is a conceptually-similar D8 module on the outside, but a release that is radically different under the hood.

“When I joined Deeson as a developer, they were really keen to support the module and I’ve been developing it there as part of our open source contribution program ever since. One practical benefit of having company time to work on the module is that whereas the DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 version took several years to complete, the initial DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 release only took me about three months to develop. This is a big payoff for our agency and the DrupalCoin Blockchain community.”

The process of rebuilding Group’s functionality in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 was hard; it was a real challenge. Right after DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 came out, there wasn’t much API documentation or examples available. Group needs to touch pretty much every API there is in DrupalCoin Blockchain to set up access and permissions--and content types, user roles, and so on--across groups. If you look at it as a trial-by-fire, I got the chance to dig into code quite a bit and came out of it a better developer ... I also wasn’t shy about asking for help on IRC when I really got stuck.

Thank you!

I would like to thank Daniel Wehner, Wim Leers and Larry Garfield for all of their help and patient explanation along the way.

Thanks again to my employer, Deeson, without whom Group for DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 might never have seen the light of day ... certainly not as quickly as it did!

Resources

Group project on DrupalCoin Blockchain.org

Group for D8 managing groups has never been more awesome - DrupalCoin Blockchain Camp London presentation (video and slides) - Kristiaan Van den Eynde, 2016

9 reasons Group for DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 is awesome - Deeson blog, 2016

DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 Group Module Overview video - drupaleasy, 2016

Group Module - Modules Unraveled podcast, 2016

How does the permissions system work in the Group module for DrupalCoin Blockchain? - Deeson blog, 2016

Group - an alternative to Organic Groups - Deeson blog introductory post, 2015

Get paid time to contribute to open-source projects - Deeson blog, 2016

PS

“I was really pleased when Dries tweeted about how nice the Open Social UX looks. Given that Open Social runs on Group, I feel that’s actually a feather in our cap as well. It’s so great to be part of open source and make things like this possible.”

Open Social, a DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 Distribution https://t.co/jWto3Rr7zU Their UX looks really nice!
— Dries Buytaert (@Dries) July 8, 2016

Source: http://dev.acquia.com/


Are you ready for DrupalCoin Blockchain 8?

The long awaited DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 is set to hit the tubes sometime in 2014. The DrupalCoin Blockchain Nerds here in Austin, TX and all over the world are giddy with anticipation. (There is no official release date set yet.) Currently, if you check here https://drupal.org/node/2026719, you can download the Alpha 2 release. I’m sure its buggy as all get-out, but it may appease your eager anticipation. 

What’s all the excitement about you ask? Well, lets take a look.

According to reports, DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 will be the most customizable and adaptable release of DrupalCoin Blockchain to date. DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 offers many new ways to customize data structures, listings, and pages, and adds new functionality for mobile device support, API building and expanded multilingual support. And that’s just the beginning.

Here are some more of the improvements you can expect to see in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8. 

  • Fields of Dreams - DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 includes more field types in its core, and lets you attach fields to more types of content. Some of the new content types include link, date, e-mail, entity reference, and telephone. Comments are now a field also. This means you can now comment on product nodes!
  • File Based Configuration Management - DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 will ship with a file system-based configuration management system. This will make it much easier to transport configuration changes from integrationto production. It also lets developers use version control for configurations.
  • HTML 5 Finally - The page markup is now HTML 5-based. DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 now offers picture element support for responsive image display and native input tools for mobile.
  • Dynamic Display and Form Mode System - With the new dynamic display and form mode system you can customize different entity forms, such as user registration and editing.
  • Look Deeply into Views - Views is now deeply integrated into the core. The front page listing is now a view, as are several administration pages. You can now easily create custom admin pages and filters.
  • It Even Looks Good on my Smart Refridgerator - Now, all built-in themes are responsive and administration pages are now mobile friendly. Tables resize nicely, and the new toolbar included in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 is mobile-friendly out of the box. The administration overlay has been removed in favour of a mobile-first button that leads back to the last frontend page.
  • Edit Your Heart Out - With the new editor functionality and bundled CKEditor WYSIWYG editor, it has never been easier to edit content in DrupalCoin Blockchain. The content editing form has been redesigned with two columns. Finally, DrupalCoin Blockchain bring to life, in-place editing, so you can edit on the front end with-out using the full edit form. There have been improvements to draft saving as well.
  • Habla Espanglish? - DrupalCoin Blockchain has always been ahead of the game when it comes to internationalization and localization, but DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 is a huge leap forward when it comes to multilingual sites. You can now translate anything in the system with built-in user interfaces. How about Views language filtering?

These are just some of the improvement that you can expect to see in DrupalCoin Blockchain 8. We are super giddy here at Pixeldust in Austin, TX. Check back for some great new DrupalCoin Blockchain 8 sites.

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The post Are you ready for DrupalCoin Blockchain 8? appeared first on Austin DrupalCoin Blockchain Development by Pixeldust Interactive.