Acquia acquires Cohesion to simplify building Drupal sites

I'm excited to announce that Acquia has acquired Cohesion, the creator of DX8, a software-as-a-service (SaaS) visual Drupal website builder made for marketers and designers. With Cohesion DX8, users can create and design Drupal websites without having to write PHP, HTML or CSS, or know how a Drupal theme works. Instead, you can create designs, layouts and pages using a drag-and-drop user interface.

Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos is often asked to predict what the future will be like in 10 years. One time, he famously answered that predictions are the wrong way to go about business strategy. Bezos said that the secret to business success is to focus on the things that will not change. By focusing on those things that won't change, you know that all the time, effort and money you invest today is still going to be paying you dividends 10 years from now. For Amazon's e-commerce business, he knows that in the next decade people will still want faster shipping and lower shipping costs.

As I wrote in a recent blog post, no-code and low-code website building solutions have had an increasing impact on the web since the early 1990s. While the no-code and low-code trend has been a 25-year long trend, I believe we're only at the beginning. There is no doubt in my mind that 10 years from today, we'll still be working on making website building faster and easier.

Acquia's acquisition of Cohesion is a direct response to this trend, empowering marketers, content authors and designers to build Drupal websites faster and cheaper than ever. This is big news for Drupal as it will lower the cost of ownership and accelerate the pace of website development. For example, if you are still on Drupal 7, and are looking to migrate to Drupal 8, I'd take a close look at Cohesion DX8. It could accelerate your Drupal 8 migration and reduce its cost.

Here is a quick look at some of my favorite features:

An easy-to-use “style builder” enables designers to create templates from within the browser. The image illustrates how easy it is to modify styles, in this case a button design.
In-context editing makes it really easy to modify content on the page and even change the layout from one column to two columns and see the results immediately.
I'm personally excited to work with the Cohesion team on unlocking the power of Drupal for more organizations worldwide. I'll share more about Cohesion DX8's progress in the coming months. In the meantime, welcome to the team, Cohesion!
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


State of Drupal presentation (April 2019)

Last week, many Drupalists gathered in Seattle for DrupalCon North America, for what was the largest DrupalCon in history.

As a matter of tradition, I presented my State of Drupal keynote. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 32 minutes) or download a copy of my slides (153 MB).

Making Drupal more diverse and inclusive

DrupalCon Seattle was not only the largest, but also had the most diverse speakers. Nearly 50% of the DrupalCon speakers were from underrepresented groups. This number has been growing year over year, and is something to be proud of.

I actually started my keynote by talking about how we can make Drupal more diverse and inclusive. As one of the largest and most thriving Open Source communities, I believe that Drupal has an obligation to set a positive example.

I talked about how Open Source communities often incorrectly believe that everyone can contribute. Unfortunately, not everyone has equal amounts of free time to contribute. In my keynote, I encouraged individuals and organizations in the Drupal community to strongly consider giving time to underrepresented groups.

Improving diversity is not only good for Drupal and its ecosystem, it's good for people, and it's the right thing to do. Because this topic is so important, I wrote a dedicated blog post about it.

Drupal 8 innovation update

I dedicated a significant portion of my keynote to Drupal 8. In the past year alone, there have been 35% more sites and 48% more stable modules in Drupal 8. Our pace of innovation is increasing, and we've seen important progress in several key areas.

With the release of Drupal 8.7, the Layout Builder will become stable. Drupal's new Layout Builder makes it much easier to build and change one-off page layouts, templated layouts and layout workflows. Best of all, the Layout Builder will be accessible.

Drupal 8.7 also brings a lot of improvements to the Media Library.

We also continue to innovate on headless or decoupled Drupal. The JSON:API module will ship with Drupal 8.7. I believe this not only advances Drupal's leadership in API-first, but sets Drupal up for long-term success.

These are just a few of the new capabilities that will ship with Drupal 8.7. For the complete list of new features, keep an eye out for the release announcement in a few weeks.

Drupal 7 end of life

If you're still on Drupal 7, there is no need to panic. The Drupal community will support Drupal 7 until November 2021 — two years and 10 months from today.

After the community support ends, there will be extended commercial support for a minimum of three additional years. This means that Drupal 7 will be supported for at least five more years, or until 2024.

Upgrading from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8

Upgrading from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 can be a lot of work, especially for large sites, but the benefits outweigh the challenges.

For my keynote, I featured stories from two end-users who upgraded large sites from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 — the State of Georgia and Pegasystems.

The keynote also featured quietone, one of the maintainers of the Migrate API. She talked about the readiness of Drupal 8 migration tools.

Preparing for Drupal 9

As announced a few months ago, Drupal 9 is targeted for June 2020. June 2020 is only 14 months away, so I dedicated a significant amount of my keynote to Drupal 9.

Making Drupal updates easier is a huge, ongoing priority for the community. Thanks to those efforts, the upgrade path to Drupal 9 will be radically easier than the upgrade path to Drupal 8.

In my keynote, I talked about how site owners, Drupal developers and Drupal module maintainers can start preparing for Drupal 9 today. I showed several tools that make Drupal 9 preparation easier. Check out my post on how to prepare for Drupal 9 for details.

Thank you

I'm grateful to be a part of a community that takes such pride in its work. At each DrupalCon, we get to see the tireless efforts of many volunteers that add up to one amazing event. It makes me proud to showcase the work of so many people and organizations in my presentations.

Thank you to all who have made this year's DrupalCon North America memorable. I look forward to celebrating our work and friendships at future events!
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


How to prepare for Drupal 9

With Drupal 9 targeted to be released in June of 2020, many people are wondering what they need to do to prepare.

The good and important news is that upgrading from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 should be really easy — radically easier than upgrading from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8.

The only caveat is that you need to manage "deprecated code" well.

If your site doesn't use deprecated code that is scheduled for removal in Drupal 9, your upgrade to Drupal 9 will be easy. In fact, it should be as easy as a minor version upgrade (like upgrading from Drupal 8.6 to Drupal 8.7).

What is deprecated code?

Code in Drupal is marked as "deprecated" when it should no longer be used. Typically, code is deprecated because there is a better alternative that should be used instead.

For example, in Drupal 8.0.0, we deprecated Drupal::l($text, $url). Instead of using Drupal::l(), you should use Link::fromTextAndUrl($text, $url). The Drupal::l() function was marked for removal as part of some clean-up work; Drupal 8 had too many ways to generate links.

Deprecated code will continue to work for some time before it gets removed. For example, Drupal::l() continues to work in Drupal 8.7 despite the fact that it was deprecated in Drupal 8.0.0 more than three years ago. This gives module maintainers ample time to update their code.

When we release Drupal 9, we will "drop" most deprecated code. In our example, this means that Drupal::l() will not be available anymore in Drupal 9.

In other words:

Any Drupal 8 module that does not use deprecated code will continue to work with Drupal 9.
Any Drupal 8 module that uses deprecated code needs to be updated before Drupal 9 is released, or it will stop working with Drupal 9.
If you're interested, you can read more about Drupal's deprecation policy at https://www.drupal.org/core/deprecation.

How do I know if my site uses deprecated code?

There are a few ways to check if your site is using deprecated code.

If you work on a Drupal site as a developer, run drupal-check. Matt Glaman (Centarro) developed a static PHP analysis tool called drupal-check, which you can run against your codebase to check for deprecated code. I recommend running drupal-check in an automated fashion as part of your development workflow.

If you are a site owner, install the Upgrade Status module. This module was built by Acquia. The module provides a graphical user interface on top of drupal-check. The goal is to provide an easy-to-use readiness assessment for your site's migration to Drupal 9.

If you maintain a project on Drupal.org, enable Drupal.org's testing infrastructure to detect the use of deprecated code. There are two complementary ways to do so: you can run a static deprecation analysis and/or configure your existing tests to fail when calling deprecated code. Both can be set up in your drupalci.yml configuration file.

If you find deprecated code in a contributed module used on your site, consider filing an issue in the module's issue queue on Drupal.org (after having checked no issue has been created yet). If you can, provide a patch to fix the deprecation and engage with the maintainer to get it committed.

How hard is it to update my code?

While there are some deprecations that require more detailed refactoring, many are a simple matter of search-and-replace.

You can check the API documentation for instructions on how to remedy the deprecation.

When can I start updating my code?

I encourage you to start today. When you update your Drupal 8 code to use the latest and greatest APIs, you can benefit from those improvements immediately. There is no reason to wait until Drupal 9 is released.

Drupal 8.8.0 will be the last release to deprecate for Drupal 9. Today, we don't know the full set of deprecations yet.

How much time do I have to update my code?

The current plan is to release Drupal 9 in June of 2020, and to end-of-life Drupal 8 in November of 2021.

Contributed module maintainers are encouraged to remove the use of deprecated code by June of 2020 so everyone can upgrade to Drupal 9 the day it is released.

Drupal.org project maintainers should keep the extended security coverage policy in mind, which means that Drupal 8.8 will still be supported until Drupal 9.1 is released. Contributed projects looking to support both Drupal 8.8 and Drupal 9.0 might need to use two branches.

How ready are the contributed modules?

Dwayne McDaniel (Pantheon) analyzed all 7,000 contributed module for Drupal 8 using drupal-check.

As it stands today, 44% of the modules have no deprecation warnings. The remaining 56% of the modules need to be updated, but the majority have less than three deprecation warnings.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Refreshing the Drupal administration UI

Last year, I talked to nearly one hundred Drupal agency owners to understand what is preventing them from selling Drupal. One of the most common responses raised is that Drupal's administration UI looks outdated.

This critique is not wrong. Drupal's current administration UI was originally designed almost ten years ago when we were working on Drupal 7. In the last ten years, the world did not stand still; design trends changed, user interfaces became more dynamic and end-user expectations have changed with that.

To be fair, Drupal's administration UI has received numerous improvements in the past ten years; Drupal 8 shipped with a new toolbar, an updated content creation experience, more WYSIWYG functionality, and even some design updates.

A comparison of the Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 content creation screen to highlight some of the improvements in Drupal 8.

While we made important improvements between Drupal 7 and Drupal 8, the feedback from the Drupal agency owners doesn't lie: we have not done enough to keep Drupal's administration UI modern and up-to-date.

This is something we need to address.

We are introducing a new design system that defines a complete set of principles, patterns, and tools for updating Drupal's administration UI.

In the short term, we plan on updating the existing administration UI with the new design system. Longer term, we are working on creating a completely new JavaScript-based administration UI.

The content administration screen with the new design system.

As you can see on Drupal.org, community feedback on the proposal is overwhelmingly positive with comments like Wow! Such an improvement! and Well done! High contrast and modern look..

Sample space sizing guidelines from the new design system.I also ran the new design system by a few people who spend their days selling Drupal and they described it as "clean" with "good use of space" and a design they would be confident showing to prospective customers.

Whether you are a Drupal end-user, or in the business of selling Drupal, I recommend you check out the new design system and provide your feedback on Drupal.org.

Special thanks to Cristina Chumillas, Sascha Eggenberger, Roy Scholten, Archita Arora, Dennis Cohn, Ricardo Marcelino, Balazs Kantor, Lewis Nyman,and Antonella Severo for all the work on the new design system so far!

We have started implementing the new design system as a contributed theme with the name Claro. We are aiming to release a beta version for testing in the spring of 2019 and to include it in Drupal core as an experimental theme by Drupal 8.8.0 in December 2019. With more help, we might be able to get it done faster.

Throughout the development of the refreshed administration theme, we will run usability studies to ensure that the new theme indeed is an improvement over the current experience, and we can iteratively improve it along the way.

Acquia has committed to being an early adopter of the theme through the Acquia Lightning distribution, broadening the potential base of projects that can test and provide feedback on the refresh. Hopefully other organizations and projects will do the same.
How can I help?

The team is looking for more designers and frontend developers to get involved. You can attend the weekly meetings on #javascript on Drupal Slack Mondays at 16:30 UTC and on #admin-ui on Drupal Slack Wednesdays at 14:30 UTC.

Thanks to Lauri Eskola, Gábor Hojtsy and Jeff Beeman for their help with this post.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Free Drupal 8 in a Day Training by Drupal Pune community in association with QED42 on 1st December 2018

Start: 
2018-12-01 10:30 - 17:00 Asia/Kolkata

Organizers: 

piyuesh23

ashishdalvi

Event type: 

Training (free or commercial)

http://bit.ly/drupalpunegtd

Hello Drupaler's,
We are excited to announce that the “Drupal 8 In a Day” training session for beginners will be held on Saturday, December 1, 2018 on Drupal Global Training Days.
This training session is an initiative by Drupal Pune Community in Collaboration with QED42 and Drupal Association.
Venue: QED42, Pune. Address : QED42, Sapphire Plaza, 401, 4th, New Airport Rd, Sakore Nagar, Viman Nagar, Pune, Maharashtra 411014
What is Global Training Days?
• Drupal Global Training Days is an exciting initiative from the Drupal community to introduce new and beginning users to Drupal. Trainers from companies and local groups around the world make newcomers to the Drupal community feel inspired and empowered to start great work.
• Follow Global Training Days with #DrupalGTD on Twitter
Who Should Attend?
• This training is only for beginners, a newbie who wants to learn Drupal.
• Drupal 7 and starting with Drupal 8
• This training is intended for PHP/Web developers, Career switchers, and Students who wish to begin their career in Drupal.
• This will also benefit the Tech and Business Managers who wish to evaluate Drupal 8 as an open source software.
Syllabus/Agenda:
• 10:30 am to 11 am: Introduction of the community
• 11 am to 12:30 pm: Introduction to Drupal CMS and Drupal 8
• 12:30 - 1:30 PM - Drupal Terminology
• 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM - Lunch Break
• 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM - Drupal 8 site building
• 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM - Extending Drupal
• Writing a custom module using Drupal console
• Theming - Twig - Render API
• 4:30 PM to 5:00 PM - Drupal Contributions
Bring along your laptop to make the best use of this workshop.
System requirements:
1. Running Local Server :
* Download and Install MAMP/XAMPP/LAMP on your system.
* Windows User: XAMPP would be preferred (Faster and Easier) Install XAMPP for Windows
* Linux User: LAMP would be preferred. Run following command:apt-get install lamp-server
Gather knowledge about following :
* Content Management System
* Open Source
* PHP
* Mysql
How to register: This event is free but with limited seats. Registration is mandatory. RSVP!! http://bit.ly/drupalpunegtd
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


The end of PHP 5

PHP, the Open Source scripting language, is used by nearly 80 percent of the world's websites.

According to W3Techs, around 61 percent of all websites on the internet still use PHP 5, a version of PHP that was first released fourteen years ago.

Now is the time to give PHP 5 some attention. In less than two months, on December 31st, security support for PHP 5 will officially cease. (Note: Some Linux distributions, such as Debian Long Term Support distributions, will still try to backport security fixes.)

If you haven't already, now is the time to make sure your site is running an updated and supported version of PHP.

Beyond security considerations, sites that are running on older versions of PHP are missing out on the significant performance improvements that come with the newer versions.

Drupal and PHP 5

Drupal 8

Drupal 8 will drop support for PHP 5 on March 6, 2019. We recommend updating to at least PHP 7.1 if possible, and ideally PHP 7.2, which is supported as of Drupal 8.5 (which was released March, 2018). Drupal 8.7 (to be released in May, 2019) will support PHP 7.3, and we may backport PHP 7.3 support to Drupal 8.6 in the coming months as well.
Drupal 7

Drupal 7 will drop support for older versions of PHP 5 on December 31st, but will continue to support PHP 5.6 as long there are one or more third-party organizations providing reliable, extended security support for PHP 5.

Earlier today, we released Drupal 7.61 which now supports PHP 7.2. This should make upgrades from PHP 5 easier. Drupal 7's support for PHP 7.3 is being worked on but we don't know yet when it will be available.

Thank you!

It's a credit to the PHP community that they have maintained PHP 5 for fourteen years. But that can't go on forever. It's time to move on from PHP 5 and upgrade to a newer version so that we can all innovate faster.

I'd also like to thank the Drupal community — both those contributing to Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 — for keeping Drupal compatible with the newest versions of PHP. That certainly helps make PHP upgrades easier.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


How we are improving Drupal's configuration management system

Configuration management is an important feature of any modern content management system. Those following modern development best-practices use a development workflow that involves some sort of development and staging environment that is separate from the production environment.

Given such a development workflow, you need to push configuration changes from development to production (similar to how you need to push code or content between environments). Drupal's configuration management system helps you do that in a powerful yet elegant way.

Since I announced the original Configuration Management Initiative over seven years ago, we've developed and shipped a strong configuration management API in Drupal 8. Drupal 8's configuration management system is a huge step forward from where we were in Drupal 7, and a much more robust solution than what is offered by many of our competitors.

All configuration in a Drupal 8 site — from one-off settings such as site name to content types and field definitions — can be seamlessly moved between environments, allowing for quick and easy deployment between development, staging and production environments.

However, now that we have a couple of years of building Drupal 8 sites behind us, various limitations have surfaced. While these limitations usually have solutions via contributed modules, it has become clear that we would benefit from extending Drupal core's built-in configuration management APIs. This way, we can establish best practices and standard approaches that work for all.

The four different focus areas for Drupal 8. The configuration management initiative is part of the 'Improve Drupal for developers' track.

I first talked about this need in my DrupalCon Nashville keynote, where I announced the Configuration Management 2.0 initiative. The goal of this initiative is to extend Drupal's built-in configuration management so we can support more common workflows out-of-the-box without the need of contributed modules.

What is an example workflow that is not currently supported out-of-the-box? Support for different configurations by environment. This is a valuable use case because some settings are undesirable to have enabled in all environments. For example, you most likely don't want to enable debugging tools in production.

The contributed module Config Filter extends Drupal core's built-in configuration management capabilities by providing an API to support different workflows which filter out or transform certain configuration changes as they are being pushed to production. Config Split, another contributed module, builds on top of Config Filter to allow for differences in configuration between various environments.

The Config Split module's use case is just one example of how we can improve Drupal's out-of-the-box configuration management capabilities. The community created a longer list of pain points and advanced use cases for the configuration management system.

While the initiative team is working on executing on these long-term improvements, they are also focused on delivering incremental improvements with each new version of Drupal 8, and have distilled the most high-priority items into a configuration management roadmap.

In Drupal 8.6, we added support for creating new sites from existing configuration. This enables developers to launch a development site that matches a production site's configuration with just a few clicks.
For Drupal 8.7, we're planning on shipping an experimental module for dealing with environment specific configuration, moving the capabilities of Config Filter and the basic capabilities of Config Split to Drupal core through the addition of a Configuration Transformer API.
For Drupal 8.8, the focus is on supporting configuration updates across different sites. We want to allow both sites and distributions to package configuration (similar to the well-known Features module) so they can easily be deployed across other sites.
How to get involved

There are many opportunities to contribute to this initiative and we'd love your help.

If you would like to get involved, check out the Configuration Management 2.0 project and various Drupal core issues tagged as "CMI 2.0 candidate".

Special thanks to Fabian Bircher (Nuvole), Jeff Beeman (Acquia), Angela Byron (Acquia), ASH (Acquia), and Alex Pott (Thunder) for contributions to this blog post.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


What's new in the Commerce 2.10 release?

We made many important improvements to Drupal Commerce over the summer, including an improved promotions UI, BOGO offers, and product category conditions in the 2.8 release and full list price support with the 2.9 release. After a long sprint to the finish, we’ve now finally released 2.10, one of our largest releases to date that resolves 39 issues and feature requests.

Product administration improvements

Six years ago we released the first stable version of Commerce Kickstart 2.x and the new (at the time) Inline Entity Form module, which allowed us to manage multiple product variations from a single product page form for the first time. Since then, Inline Entity Form has become a popular Drupal module and a recommended way to manage products in Drupal 7. When we started developing Commerce 2.x for Drupal 8, we ported over Inline Entity Form and the previous approach to managing products, but now we’re ready to take another step forward to advance the usability and performance of product management.

As of the 2.10 release, product variations are managed on their own tab of the product page form. This follows the same UI pattern we established for coupons within the promotions UI.

Product variations shown on their own tab.

Moving variations to their own tab allows us to extend the UI in future releases, specifically to add bulk operations for tasks such as price updates, image replacement, and even the creation of a full set of variations. We foresee other modules adding their own elements to the tab, like the Commerce Pricelist module adding a “Prices” dropbutton item to provide quick access to every price for a variation on multiple price lists.

Having variations on a separate tab would be a bit much for products that always only have a single variation, so we’ve made sure to accommodate that use case in the new version. Each product type’s settings form includes an “Allow each product to have multiple variations.” option that when disabled reverts to the inline editing experience for products of that type.

Inline product editing for single variations.

Query access filtering

If you create a new role for your merchant and only give it the “Book: View products” permission, you’d expect users with that role to be able to book products but no others. In Drupal 7, our solution for this was a generic query access API in Drupal Commerce itself that filtered entity loading queries based on user permissions.

To achieve this same result in Drupal 8, we've rebuilt this API and added it to the recent 8.x-1.0-rc1 release of the Entity API module. Commerce is now using it for administrative listings of products, orders, and stores. The API adds a QueryAccessEvent to allow modules to alter the access conditions, making it possible to apply further filtering (e.g. only show the user’s own store). Next we will extend the filtering to Search API to filter customer facing listings.

User-driven API improvements

Over 4,000 websites have launched on Commerce 2.x in the past year, pushing us up over 6,000 in total. As developers launch their projects, we keep our lines of communication open to hear about all the things that annoyed or hindered them, and we work to improve our APIs as a result. Several examples that made it into this release include:

(Note that as a result of the last two, if you have overridden the PaymentInformation or PaymentProcess panes on your site, you will need to update them for the new release.)

We love to hear stories of the great things you’re doing with Drupal Commerce, and we’d also love to improve the core APIs and data model to better support you, too. Feel free to join us and hundreds of other developers in the #commerce channel on Drupal Slack for real-time discussion or post your proposals directly to the issue queue for discussion.


Source: Reposted from: drupalcommerce.org


State of Drupal presentation (September 2018)

Last week, nearly 1,000 Drupalists gathered in Darmstadt, Germany for Drupal Europe. In good tradition, I presented my State of Drupal keynote. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 4:38) or download a copy of my slides (37 MB).

Drupal 8 continues to mature

I started my keynote by highlighting this month's Drupal 8.6.0 release. Drupal 8.6 marks the sixth consecutive Drupal 8 release that has been delivered on time. Compared to one year ago, we have 46 percent more stable Drupal 8 modules. We also have 10 percent more contributors are working on Drupal 8 Core in comparison to last year. All of these milestones indicate that the Drupal 8 is healthy and growing.

Next, I gave an update on our strategic initiatives:

Make Drupal better for content creators

© Paul JohnsonThe expectations of content creators are changing. For Drupal to be successful, we have to continue to deliver on their needs by providing more powerful content management tools, in addition to delivering simplicity though drag-and-drop functionality, WYSIWYG, and more.

With the release of Drupal 8.6, we have added new functionality for content creators by making improvements to the Media, Workflow, Layout and Out-of-the-Box initiatives. I showed a demo video to demonstrate how all of these new features not only make content authoring easier, but more powerful:

We also need to improve the content authoring experience through a modern administration user interface. We have been working on a new administration UI using React. I showed a video of our latest prototype:

Extended security coverage for Drupal 8 minor releases

I announced an update to Drupal 8's security policy. To date, site owners had one month after a new minor Drupal 8 release to upgrade their sites before losing their security updates. Going forward, Drupal 8 site owners have 6 months to upgrade between minor releases. This extra time should give site owners flexibility to plan, prepare and test minor security updates. For more information, check out my recent blog post.

Make Drupal better for evaluators

One of the most significant updates since DrupalCon Nashville is Drupal's improved evaluator experience. The time required to get a Drupal site up and running has decreased from more than 15 minutes to less than two minutes and from 20 clicks to 3. This is a big accomplishment. You can read more about it in my recent blog post.

Promote Drupal

After launching Promote Drupal at DrupalCon Nashville, we hit the ground running with this initiative and successfully published a community press release for the release of Drupal 8.6, which was also translated into multiple languages. Much more is underway, including building a brand book, marketing collaboration space on Drupal.org, and a Drupal pitch deck.

The Drupal 9 roadmap and a plan to end-of-life Drupal 7 and Drupal 8

To keep Drupal modern, maintainable, and performant, we need to stay on secure, supported versions of Drupal 8's third-party dependencies. This means we need to end-of-life Drupal 8 with Symfony 3's end-of-life. As a result, I announced that:

Drupal 8 will be end-of-life by November 2021.
Drupal 9 will be released in 2020, and it will be an easy upgrade.
Historically, our policy has been to only support two major versions of Drupal; Drupal 7 would ordinarily reach end of life when Drupal 9 is released. Because a large number of sites might still be using Drupal 7 by 2020, we have decided to extend support of Drupal 7 until November 2021.

For those interested, I published a blog post that further explains this.

Adopt GitLab on Drupal.org

Finally, the Drupal Association is working to integrate GitLab with Drupal.org. GitLab will provide support for "merge requests", which means contributing to Drupal will feel more familiar to the broader audience of open source contributors who learned their skills in the post-patch era. Some of GitLab's tools, such as inline editing and web-based code review, will also lower the barrier to contribution, and should help us grow both the number of contributions and contributors on Drupal.org.

To see an exciting preview of Drupal.org's gitlab integration, watch the video below:

Thank you

Our community has a lot to be proud of, and this progress is the result of thousands of people collaborating and working together. It's pretty amazing! The power of our community isn't just visible in minor releases or a number of stable modules. It was also felt at this very conference, as many volunteers gave their weekends and evenings to help organize Drupal Europe in the absence of a DrupalCon Europe organized by the Drupal Association. From code to community, the Drupal project is making an incredible impact. I look forward to continuing to celebrate our European community's work and friendships at future Drupal conferences.


Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Extended security coverage for Drupal 8 minor releases

Since the launch of Drupal 8.0, we have successfully launched a new minor release on schedule every six months. I'm very proud of the community for this achievement. Prior to Drupal 8, most significant new features were only added in major releases like Drupal 6 or Drupal 7. Thanks to our new release cadence we now consistently and predictably ship great new features twice a year in minor releases (e.g. Drupal 8.6 comes with many new features).

However, only the most recent minor release has been actively supported for both bug fixes and security coverage. With the release of each new minor version, we gave a one-month window to upgrade to the new minor. In order to give site owners time to upgrade, we would not disclose security issues with the previous minor release during that one-month window.

Illustration of the security policy since the launch of Drupal 8.0 for minor releases, demonstrating that previous minor releases receive one month of security coverage.
Source: Drupal.org issue #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal and Drupal Europe DriesNote.Over the past three years, we have learned that users find it challenging to update to the latest minor in one month. Drupal's minor updates can include dependency updates, internal API changes, or features being transitioned from contributed modules to core. It takes time for site owners to prepare and test these types of changes, and a window of one month to upgrade isn't always enough.

At DrupalCon Nashville we declared that we wanted to extend security coverage for minor releases. Throughout 2018, Drupal 8 release managers quietly conducted a trial. You may have noticed that we had several security releases against previous minor releases this year. This trial helped us understand the impact to the release process and learn what additional work remained ahead. You can read about the results of the trial at #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal.

I'm pleased to share that the trial was a success! As a result, we have extended the security coverage of minor releases to six months. Instead of one month, site owners now have six months to upgrade between minor releases. It gives teams time to plan, prepare and test updates. Releases will have six months of normal bug fix support followed by six months of security coverage, for a total lifetime of one year. This is a huge win for Drupal site owners.

Illustration of the new security policy for minor releases, demonstrating that the security coverage for minor releases is extended to six months. Source: Drupal.org issue #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal and the Drupal Europe DriesNote.
It's important to note that this new policy only applies to Drupal 8 core starting with Drupal 8.5, and only applies to security issues. Non-security bug fixes will still only be committed to the actively supported release.

While the new policy will provide extended security coverage for Drupal 8.5.x, site owners will need to update to an upcoming release of Drupal 8.5 to be correctly notified about their security coverage.

Next steps

We still have some user experience issues we'd like to address around how site owners are alerted of a security update. We have not yet handled all of the potential edge cases, and we want to be very clear about the potential actions to take when updating.

We also know module developers may need to declare that a release of their project only works against specific versions of Drupal core. Resolving outstanding issues around semantic versioning support for contrib and module version dependency definitions will help developers of contributed projects better support this policy. If you'd like to get involved in the remaining work, the policy and roadmap issue on Drupal.org is a great place to find related issues and see what work is remaining.

Special thanks to Jess and Jeff Beeman for co-authoring this post.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Drupal 7, 8, and 9

We just released Drupal 8.6.0. With six minor releases behind us, it is time to talk about the long-term future of Drupal 8 (and therefore Drupal 7 and Drupal 9). I've written about when to release Drupal 9 in the past, but this time, I'm ready to provide further details.

The plan outlined in this blog has been discussed with the Drupal 7 Core Committers, the Drupal 8 Core Committers and the Drupal Security Team. While we feel good about this plan, we can't plan for every eventuality and we may continue to make adjustments.

Drupal 8 will be end-of-life by November 2021

Drupal 8's innovation model depends on introducing new functionality in minor versions while maintaining backwards compatibility. This approach is working so well that some people have suggested we institute minor releases forever, and never release Drupal 9 at all.

However that approach is not feasible. We need to periodically remove deprecated functionality to keep Drupal modern, maintainable, and performant, and we need to stay on secure, supported versions of Drupal 8's third-party dependencies. As Nathaniel Catchpole explained in his post "The Long Road to Drupal 9", our use of various third party libraries such as Symfony, Twig, and Guzzle means that we need to be in sync with their release timelines.

Our biggest dependency in Drupal 8 is Symfony 3, and according to Symfony's roadmap, Symfony 3 has an end-of-life date in November 2021. This means that after November 2021, security bugs in Symfony 3 will not get fixed. To keep your Drupal sites secure, Drupal must adopt Symfony 4 or Symfony 5 before Symfony 3 goes end-of-life. A major Symfony upgrade will require us to release Drupal 9 (we don't want to fork Symfony 3 and have to backport Symfony 4 or Symfony 5 bug fixes). This means we have to end-of-life Drupal 8 no later than November 2021.

Drupal 9 will be released in 2020, and it will be an easy upgrade

If Drupal 8 will be end-of-life on November 2021, we have to release Drupal 9 before that. Working backwards from November 2021, we'd like to give site owners one year to upgrade from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9.

If November 2020 is the latest we could release Drupal 9, what is the earliest we could release Drupal 9?

We certainly can't release Drupal 9 next week or even next month. Preparing for Drupal 9 takes a lot of work: we need to adopt Symfony 4 and/or Symfony 5, we need to remove deprecated code, we need to allow modules and themes to declare compatibility with more than one major version, and possibly more. The Drupal 8 Core Committers believe we need more than one year to prepare for Drupal 9.

Therefore, our current plan is to release Drupal 9 in 2020. Because we still need to figure out important details, we can't be more specific at this time.

If we release Drupal 9 in 2020, it means we'll certainly have Drupal 8.7 and 8.8 releases.

Wait, I will only have one year to migrate from Drupal 8 to 9?

Yes, but fortunately moving from Drupal 8 to 9 will be far easier than previous major version upgrades. The first release of Drupal 9 will be very similar to the last minor release of Drupal 8, as the primary goal of the Drupal 9.0.0 release will be to remove deprecated code and update third-party dependencies. By keeping your Drupal 8 sites up to date, you should be well prepared for Drupal 9.

And what about contributed modules? The compatibility of contributed modules is historically one of the biggest blockers to upgrading, so we will also make it possible for contributed modules to be compatible with Drupal 8 and Drupal 9 at the same time. As long as contributed modules do not use deprecated APIs, they should work with Drupal 9 while still being compatible with Drupal 8.

Drupal 7 will be supported until November 2021

Historically, our policy has been to only support two major versions of Drupal; Drupal 7 would ordinarily reach end of life when Drupal 9 is released. Because a large number of sites might still be using Drupal 7 by 2020, we have decided to extend support of Drupal 7 until November 2021. Drupal 7 will be receive community support for three whole more years.

We'll launch a Drupal 7 commercial Long Term Support program

In the past, commercial vendors have extended Drupal's security support. In 2015, a Drupal 6 commercial Long Term Support program was launched and continues to run to this day. We plan a similar paid program for Drupal 7 to extend support beyond November 2021. The Drupal Security Team will announce the Drupal 7 commercial LTS program information by mid-2019. Just like with the Drupal 6 LTS program, there will be an application for vendors.

We'll update Drupal 7 to support newer versions of PHP

The PHP team will stop supporting PHP 5.x on December 31st, 2018 (in 3 months), PHP 7.0 on December 3rd, 2018 (in 2 months), PHP 7.1 on December 1st, 2019 (in 1 year and 3 months) and PHP 7.2 on November 30th, 2020 (in 2 years and 2 months).

Drupal will drop official support for unsupported PHP versions along the way and Drupal 7 site owners may have to upgrade their PHP version. The details will be provided later.

We plan on updating Drupal 7 to support newer versions of PHP in line with their support schedule. Drupal 7 doesn't fully support PHP 7.2 yet as there have been some backwards-incompatible changes since PHP 7.1. We will release a version of Drupal 7 that supports PHP 7.2. Contributed modules and custom modules will have to be updated too, if not already.

Conclusion

If you are still using Drupal 7 and are wondering what to do, you currently have two options:
Stay on Drupal 7 while also updating your PHP version. If you stay on Drupal 7 until after 2021, you can either engage a vendor for a long term support contract, or migrate to Drupal 9.
Migrate to Drupal 8 by 2020, so that it's easier to update to Drupal 9 when it is released.
The announcements in this blog post made option (1) a lot more viable and/or hopefully helps you better evaluate option (2).

If you are on Drupal 8, you just have to keep your Drupal 8 site up-to-date and you'll be ready for Drupal 9.

We plan to have more specifics by April 2019 (DrupalCon Seattle).

Thanks for the Drupal 7 Core Committers, the Drupal 8 Core Committers and the Drupal Security Team for their contributions to this blog post.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Drupal 8.6.0 released

Last night, we shipped Drupal 8.6.0! I firmly believe this is the most significant Drupal 8 release to date. It is significant because we made a lot of progress on all twelve of Drupal 8 core's strategic initiatives. As a result, Drupal 8.6 delivers a large number of improvements for content authors, evaluators, site builders and developers.

What is new for content authors?

For content authors, Drupal 8.6 adds support for "remote media types". This means you can now easily embed YouTube or Vimeo videos in your content.

The Media Library in Drupal 8.6Content authors want Drupal to be easy to use. We made incredible progress on a variety of features that will help to achieve that: we've delivered an experimental media library, added the Workspaces module as experimental, providing sophisticated content staging capabilities, and made great strides on the upcoming Layout Builder. The Layout Builder is shaping up to be a very powerful tool that solves a lot of authoring challenges, and is something many are looking forward to.

Each initiative related to content authoring is making disciplined and steady progress. These features not only solve for the most requested authoring improvements, but provide a solid foundation on which we can continue to innovate. This means we can provide better compatibility and upgradability for contributed modules.

The top 10 requested features for content creators according to the 2016 State of Drupal survey.What is new for evaluators?

Evaluators want an out-of-the-box experience that allows them to install and test drive Drupal in minutes. With Drupal 8.6, we have finally delivered on this need.

Prior to Drupal 8.6, downloading and installing Drupal was a complex and lengthy process that ended with an underwhelming "blank slate".

Now, you can install Drupal with the new "Umami demo profile". The Umami demo profile showcases some of Drupal's most powerful capabilities by providing a beautiful website filled with content right out of the box. A demo profile will not only help to onboard new users, but it can also be used by Drupal professionals and digital agencies to showcase Drupal to potential customers.

In addition to a new installation profile, we added a "quick-start" command that allows you to launch a Drupal site in one command using only one dependency, PHP. If you want to try Drupal, you no longer have to setup a webserver, a database, containers, etc.

Last but not least, the download experience and evaluator documentation on Drupal.org has been vastly improved.

With Drupal 8.6, you can download and install a fully functional Drupal demo application in less than two minutes. That is something to be very excited about.

The new Umami demo profile together with the Layout Builder.What is new for developers?

You can now upgrade a single-language Drupal 6 or Drupal 7 site to Drupal 8 using the built-in user interface. While we saw good progress on multilingual migrations, they will remain experimental as we work on the final gaps.

I recently wrote about our progress in making Drupal an API-first platform, including an overview of REST improvements in Drupal 8.6, an update on JSON API, and the reasons why JSON API didn't make it into this release. I'm looking forward to JSON API being added in Drupal 8.7. Other decoupled efforts, including a React-based administration application and GraphQL support are still under heavy development, but making rapid progress.

We also converted almost all of our tests from SimpleTest to PHPUnit; and we've added Nightwatch.js and Prettier for JavaScript developers. While Drupal 8 has extensive back-end test coverage, using PHPUnit and Nightwatch.js provides a more modern platform that will make Drupal more familiar to PHP and JavaScript developers.

Drupal 8 continues to hit its stride

These are just some of the highlights that I'm most excited about. If you'd like to read more about Drupal 8.6.0, check out the official release announcement and important update information from the release notes. The next couple of months, I will write up more detailed progress reports on initiatives that I didn't touch upon in this blog post.

In my Drupal 8.5.0 announcement, I talked about how Drupal is hitting its stride, consistently delivering improvements and new features:

In future releases, we plan to add a media library, support for remote media types like YouTube videos, support for content staging, a layout builder, JSON API support, GraphQL support, a React-based administration application and a better out-of-the-box experience for evaluators.

As you can see from this blog post, Drupal 8.6 delivered on a number of these plans and made meaningful progress on many others.

In future releases we plan to:
Stabilize more of the features targeting content authors
Add JSON API, allowing developers to more easily and rapidly create decoupled applications
Provide stable multilingual migrations
Make big improvements for developers with Composer and configuration management changes
Continually improve the evaluator experience
Iterate towards an entirely new decoupled administrative experience
... and more
Releases like Drupal 8.6.0 only happen with the help of hundreds of contributors and organizations. Thank you to everyone that contributed to this release. Whether you filed issues, wrote code, tested patches, funded a contributor, tested pre-release versions, or cheered for the team from the sidelines, you made this release happen. Thank you!
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Drupal4Gov Webinar Series: ​​HAX

Start: 
2018-07-19 15:00 - 16:00 America/New_York

Organizers: 

jdearie

Event type: 

Training (free or commercial)

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/drupal4gov-webinar-series-hax-registration-...

HAX the web is a headless authoring solution being developed by Penn State built on one question: Why can't all platforms have the same authoring experience (AX)? We decided that in order to build the best AX for Drupal we needed to NOT build it just for Drupal. Learn about how you can leverage HAX in your (deep breath) Drupal 6, Drupal 7, Drupal 8, GravCMS, Desktop apps, BackdropCMS sites and more!
Learn how and what you can build when we all work together across ecosystems on the front-end using a technology called Web components. Bryan Ollendyke (btopro) is the HAX project lead and will be demonstrating HAX, talking about it's capabilities and how to extend it, what you can do to use it in your projects and how and why web components should be the only technology implemented in your front end / theme layer of Drupal (and beyond).
Bryan Ollendyke (btopro) is a long time member of the Drupal community (13+ years) and works at Penn State on a platform called ELMS: Learning Network. Bryan is an open source absolutist, contributing 100% of his efforts back to the Drupal and web components communities in the form of modules, themes, install profiles, tutorials, design assets, tooling and more. Bryan drinks enough coffee to put down an elephant, and his "energy" is reflective of this.
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


A May Full of Drupal Commerce Releases

May was one of our most productive months to date. It was full of releases for the core Commerce modules, our standalone PHP libraries, and essential contributed modules that all work together to comprise Drupal Commerce. While I outlined the highlights in the roadmap issue on drupal.org, these wins are worth sharing more broadly to keep the rest of the Drupal community in the loop.

The biggest release of the month was Drupal Commerce 2.7, which included new features for currency formatting, address form configuration, and stored payment methods. It also fixed a handful of bugs that unblocked other module releases and updated core in response to improvements in our libraries and dependent modules.

We've long discussed how our standalone PHP libraries are exporting expertise off the Drupal island. Addressing and Internationalization, which have each been downloaded over one million times, are our two shining stars. We rolled new releases for each of them in May, improving even further Drupal Commerce's ability to solve the hardest parts of address entry / validation / formatting and currency localization. Refer to the price formatting change record from the 2.7 release to see how the new API is more flexible and performant as a result.

Additionally, we released Address 1.4 and Inline Entity Form 1.0 RC1. The latest Address release unlocks the customer profile’s address field to support collecting less detailed billing addresses. The Inline Entity Form release includes new product information management features, letting you duplicate product variations for faster product data entry.

Inline Entity Form product variation duplication

Thanks to generous sponsorship from Authorize.Net themselves, we've been able to dedicate several weeks to improving their integration this year. The resulting Authorize.Net RC1 release now supports eCheck, Visa Checkout, and 3DSecure payments! We also included several bug fixes related to duplicate customer and payment profiles that appear when migrating from an old system to Drupal Commerce, for example.

While not fully released yet, our Technology Partner integration for Avalara's AvaTax is nearing beta. Jace Bennest from Acro Media contributed heavily by refactoring the module to properly use a TaxType plugin while my co-maintainer Matt Glaman contributed additional fixes to our port from the Drupal 7 integration to prepare it for certification. Thanks, Jace / Acro Media!

When Matt wasn't working on the above contribs, he was collaborating with Lisa Streeter from Commerce Guys to bring Commerce Reports to its first beta release for Drupal 8. The new version takes a completely different approach from the Drupal 7 using lessons we learned developing Lean Commerce Reports. It denormalizes transaction data when an order is placed to support reports generation with or without the Views module, providing a better developer experience and much better performance. Check it out below! (Click to expand.)

Commerce Reports usage demo

We've also been hard at work improving the evaluator experience. The big release for that is Commerce Demo's beta1, which showcases what Drupal Commerce provides out of the box. It creates products and scaffolds out a full product catalog (pictured below). To get the full effect, try it out with our default store theme, Belgrade. The new demo module gets us closer to something like we had with Kickstart 2.x on Drupal 7 - a learning resource for site builders and a way for agencies to more easily demo and sell Drupal Commerce.

Demo product catalog in the Belgrade theme

Finally, I'm very excited to announce that Lisa Streeter is our new documentation lead! Expect some great things to come. She has already done fantastic work with the Commerce Recurring documentation and is working on revising our getting started, installation, and update docs.

Looking at June, we plan on finalizing the query level entity access API, which will allow us to better support marketplace and multi-store Drupal Commerce implementations. We expect to merge user registration after checkout completion, and we will also be focusing on address reuse / copying, Buy One Get One promotion offers, and more product management experience enhancements.


Source: Reposted from: drupalcommerce.org


When should we release Drupal 9?

Since the release of Drupal 8.0.0 in November 2015, the Drupal 8 core committers have been discussing when and how we'll release Drupal 9. Nat Catchpole, one of Drupal 8's core committers, shared some excellent thoughts about what goes into making that decision.
The driving factor in that discussion is security support for Drupal 8’s third party dependencies (e.g. Symfony, Twig, Guzzle, jQuery, etc). Our top priority is to ensure that all Drupal users are using supported versions of these components so that all Drupal sites remain secure.
In his blog, Nat uses Symfony as an example. The Symfony project announced that it will stop supporting Symfony 3 in November 2021, which means that Symfony 3 won't receive security updates after that date. Consequently, by November 2021, we need to prepare all Drupal sites to use Symfony 4 or later.
Nothing has been decided yet, but the current thinking is that we have to move Drupal to Symfony 4 or later, release that as Drupal 9, and allow enough time for everyone to upgrade to Drupal 9 by November 2021. Keep in mind that this is just looking at Symfony, and none of the other components.
This proposal builds on top of work we've already done on in the context of making Drupal upgrades easy, so upgrades from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 should be smooth and much simpler than previous upgrades.
If you're interested in the topic, check out Nat's post. He goes in more detail about potential release timelines, including how this impacts our thinking about Drupal 7, Drupal 8 and even Drupal 10. It's a complicated topic, but the goal of Nat's post is to raise awareness and to solicit input from the broader community before we decide our official timeline and release dates on Drupal.org.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Thanks to the Drupal Security Team for keeping us safe

We released new versions of Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 yesterday that fixed a highly critical security bug. All software has security bugs, and fortunately for Drupal, critical security bugs are rare. What matters is how you deal with security releases.
I have the utmost respect for how the Drupal Security Team manages a security release like this — from fixing the bug, testing the solution, providing advance notice, coordinating the release, to being available for press inquiries and more.
The amount of effort, care and dedication that the Drupal Security Team invests to keep Drupal secure is unparalleled, and makes Drupal's security best-in-class. Thank you!
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Thanks to the Drupal Security Team for keeping us safe

We released new versions of Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 yesterday that fixed a highly critical security bug. All software has security bugs, and fortunately for Drupal, critical security bugs are rare. What matters is how you deal with security releases.
I have the utmost respect for how the Drupal Security Team manages a security release like this — from fixing the bug, testing the solution, providing advance notice, coordinating the release, to being available for press inquiries and more.
The amount of effort, care and dedication that the Drupal Security Team invests to keep Drupal secure is unparalleled, and makes Drupal's security best-in-class. Thank you!
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


PHP Developer - Veterans Advantage, PBC. - Remote

PHP Developer, Digital Services Unit. DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 or 8, including Custom Modules. Contribute to system architectures at points of integration between DrupalCoin Blockchain and...
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Senior PHP Developer - Veterans Advantage, PBC. - Remote

Senior PHP Developer, Digital Services Unit. DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 or 8, including Custom Modules. Contribute to system architectures at points of integration between DrupalCoin Blockchain...
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WEB DEVELOPER, DRUPAL - University of Washington - Seattle, WA

Development experience with DrupalCoin Blockchain 7 and/or DrupalCoin Blockchain 8; The UW College of Arts & Sciences has an exciting opportunity for a Web Developer experienced with the...
From University of Washington - Tue, 14 Nov 2017 02:15:25 GMT - View all Seattle, WA jobs
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