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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


web developers West Valley City UT

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


Drupal Cafe #21

Start: 
2020-03-21 11:00 - 15:25 UTC

Organizers: 

adcillc

Anastasiya Dubina

Event type: 

Sprint

https://drupal-omsk.timepad.ru/event/1229360/

The 21th Drupal Cafe organized by ADCI Solutions will take place on March, 21.
Drupal Cafe is a meeting for experienced developers and graduates of IT specialties. This event will be also helpful for those who want to start working with Drupal. At this time we will share our experience and talk about the latest technologies.
When: March, 21.
Where: ADCI Events Hub, Omsk, Dumskaya Str., 7, 5th floor
Time: 11:00
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


Drupal Global Training Day (GTD) 2019 at Thiruvananthapuram

Start: 
2019-12-21 10:00 - 17:00 Asia/Kolkata

Event type: 

Training (free or commercial)

https://icfoss.in/event/drupal-global-training-day

Drupal is a free and open-source CMS (Content Management System),
used by millions of people and organizations around the world, to build and maintain their websites.
It is known for its powerfulness, flexibility and scalability, and hence is preferred by some of the top business and government organizations, including the Government of Australia, Red Cross, Harvard, The Economist, BBC, NBC News, Whole Foods, Cisco, Twitter, and many, many more.
With the huge acceptance that Drupal has in such high profile projects, it is now a big career choice for many.
And with the lack of Drupal developers in the market, people who know Drupal are much in demand.
And the best way to learn Drupal, is from the people that help build it.
ICFOSS (icfoss.in),
in association with Zyxware Technologies (zyxware.com), and
assisted by DrupalTVM (the local Drupal community in Thiruvananthapuram - groups.drupal.org/tvm),
as part of the Drupal Global Training Days (GTD) 2019,
is doing a FREE (seats limited) one-day Drupal training program,
AT International Centre for Free and Open Source Software (ICFOSS),
Sports Hub (Greenfield International Stadium), Karyavattom, Thiruvananthapuram,
ON 21st December, 2019 (Saturday),
from 10:00am to 05:00pm,
for anyone who is interested in learning more about and making use of Drupal.
In the carefully crafted sessions, you'll learn about
what Drupal is,
where and how to make use of it,
how to connect with the opensource community behind it, and
how to help in building it as part of that welcoming community.
Sessions:
Morning Sessions (10:00 AM - 1:00 PM):
Opening Remarks
Why Drupal? and What is the best way to learn Drupal?
Drupal Showcase – Case Study
Introduction to DrupalTVM - groups.drupal.org/tvm
Afternoon Session (2:00 PM - 5:00 PM):
Drupal Workshop - Build a simple Drupal 8 application from scratch, in 3 hrs.
Pre-requisites for the workshop:
Bring your own laptop, with the following installed:
Preferred OS: Ubuntu 18.04
LAMP environment - {PHP 7.1 / 7.2, Apache2 with mod_rewrite enabled, MySQL/MariaDB}
If you need any help with installing these, please come in early that day,
and let us know before the event starts so that we can guide you with that.
Registration link: https://applications.icfoss.org/Drupal/
Last date of registering: 19th December, 2019.
No. of free seats: 100
Make sure you apply right away to make use of this wonderful opportunity and to start learning Drupal!
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


Drupal Global Training Day - 2019 at Trivandrum, Kerala, India

Start: 
2019-12-21 10:00 - 17:00 Asia/Kolkata

Organizers: 

vimaljoseph

krishnarp

antojose

Lijo Abraham

lipinponmala007

Event type: 

Training (free or commercial)

https://applications.icfoss.org/Drupal/

The Drupal community is one of the largest open source communities in the world. There are more than 1,000,000 passionate developers, designers, trainers, strategists, coordinators, editors, and sponsors working together. Drupal Global Training Day (GTD) is an initiative of Drupal Association which represents the global Drupal community to introduce people to Drupal. The session aims to provide awareness of Drupal basics and its community. Attendees will leave with an understanding of what Drupal is and how to get started with the software, the community and Drupal.org.
International Centre for Free and Open Source Software (ICFOSS) an autonomous institution under Government of Kerala mandated with propagation, promotion and development of Free and Open Source Software is organising the Drupal Global Training Day in Trivandrum on December 21,2019 from 10.00 am to 5.00 pm. We invite you to participate in this event and be an active part of the global Drupal Community. The event is organised by ICFOSS in partnership with Zyxware Technologies.
Targeted Audience
Decision makers from Government and Business who are interested in knowing and evaluating Drupal for their requirements.
Anyone who wants to learn and contribute to Drupal.
Anyone who knows Drupal and want to understand the possibilities and best practices.
Please note that the registration is limited to first 100 participants and at free of cost.
Agenda
Date : December 21, 2019, Saturday
Time : 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Venue: ICFOSS, Sports Hub, Karyavattom, Trivandrum
Morning Session (10:00 AM - 1:00 PM)
Opening Remarks
Why Drupal? and What is the best way to learn Drupal?
Drupal Showcase – Case Study
Introduction to DrupalTVM - groups.drupal.org/tvm
Afternoon Session (2:00 PM - 5:00 PM)
Drupal Workshop - Build a simple Drupal 8 application from scratch in 3 hrs.
Prerequisite for Drupal Workshop
The participants need to bring a laptop with the following installed.
MySQL 5.5.3/MariaDB 5.5.20/Percona Server 5.5.8 or higher with InnoDB as the primary storage engine, and requires the PDO database extension.
Apache2 - rewrite module enabled.
PHP 7.1 or 7.2 - Required memory size is 256MB. PHP GD and PDO enabled
A GNU/Linux system (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) is recommended. If you can install https://www.drupalvm.com/ everything required will be preinstalled.
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


Global Training & First Contribution Day 2019-1207 Tokyo

Start: 
2019-12-07 10:00 - 17:00 Asia/Tokyo

Event type: 

Training (free or commercial)

https://cmslabo.doorkeeper.jp/events/100466

Global Training & First Contribution Day 2019 1207 Tokyo

Global Training Day for beginners,
How to install, manage content, admin functions, modules, Themes, and so on.
Drupal 8 Hands-on training.
Since it is a one-day training, hands-on to experience Drupal concepts, especially how to build and manage databases.

First Contribution Day for Drupal developers and users
How to contribute Drupal community and how to use contribution resources that used at DrupalCon Europe Amsterdam 2019 Contribution Day Workshop.

Details and Registration is here,https://cmslabo.doorkeeper.jp/events/100466
We look forward to your participation.
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


DRUPALCAMP CHENNAI 2019

Start: 
2019-12-07 09:00 - 2019-12-08 18:00 Asia/Kolkata

Organizers: 

SenthilMohith

PunamShelke

Sharmila.S

Shyamala

arunkumark

Mandakini_Kumari

Event type: 

Drupalcamp or Regional Summit

http://drupalcampchennai.org/

We are happy to announce the first-ever Drupal Camp in Chennai organized by the Drupal Chennai Community. Drupal Camp Chennai 2019 is a conference organized for the Drupal community and people showing interest in Drupal. This two-day event features training workshops and sessions. It will be held on 7th and 8th December 2019 in IIT Madras
The Drupal Camp is not only about the conference, the sessions and the informal gatherings (BOFs) but also about bonding with an array of energetic and passionate people. After all, you come to Drupal for the code and stay for the community.
The conference programme has been arranged to suit both completely new and advanced developers.
During the conference, speakers will deliver their lectures in English and native-languages of South India like Tamil, Malayalam, and Telugu.
Spend your weekend with a wonderful community which collaborates, networks, connects, and shares. The community that is Drupal is truly exceptional.

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Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


State of Drupal presentation (October 2019)

Last week, many Drupalists came together for Drupalcon Amsterdam.

As a matter of tradition, I presented my State of Drupal keynote. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 20:44 minutes), or download a copy of my slides (149 MB).

Drupal 8 innovation update

I kicked off my keynote with an update on Drupal 8. Drupal 8.8 is expected to ship on December 4th, and will come with many exciting improvements.

Drupal 8.7 shipped with a Media Library to allow editors to reuse images, videos and other media assets. In Drupal 8.8, Media Library has been marked as stable, and features a way to easily embed media assets using a WYSIWYG text editor.

I'm even more proud to say that Drupal has never looked better, nor been more accessible. I showed our progress on Claro, a new administration UI for Drupal. Once Claro is stable, Drupal will look more modern and appealing out-of-the-box.

The Composer Initiative has also made significant progress. Drupal 8.8 will be the first Drupal release with proper, official support for Composer out-of-the-box. Composer helps solve the problem of Drupal being difficult to install and update. With Composer, developers can update Drupal in one step, as Composer will take care of updating all the dependencies (e.g. third party code).

What is better than one-step updates? Zero-step updates. We also showed progress on the Automated Updates Initiative.

Finally, Drupal 8.8 marks significant progress with our API-first Initiative, with several new improvements to JSON:API support in the contributed space, including an interactive query builder called JSON:API Explorer. This work solidifies Drupal's leadership position as a leading headless or decoupled solution.

Drupal 9 will be the easiest major update

Next, I gave an update on Drupal 9, as we're just eight months from the target release date. We have been working hard to make Drupal 9 the easiest major update in the last decade. In my keynote at 42:25, I showed how to upgrade your site to Drupal 9.0.0's development release.

Drupal 9 product strategy

I am proud of all the progress we made on Drupal 8. Nevertheless, it's also time to start thinking about our strategic priorities for Drupal 9. With that in mind, I proposed four strategic tracks for Drupal 9 (and three initial initiatives):

Strategic track 1: reduce cost and effort

Users want site development to be low-cost and zero-maintenance. As a result, we'll need to continue to focus on initiatives such as automated updates, configuration management, and more.

Strategic track 2: prioritizing the beginner experience

As we saw in a survey Acqua's UX team conducted, most people have a relatively poor initial impression of Drupal, though if they stick with Drupal long enough, their impression of Drupal grows significantly over time. This unlike any of its competitors, whose impression decreases as experience is gained. Drupal 9 should focus on attracting new users, and decreasing beginners' barriers to entry so they can fall in love with Drupal much sooner.

Beginners struggle with Drupal while experts love Drupal.Drupal's sentiment curve goes in the opposite direction of WordPress', AEM's and Sitecore's. This presents both a big challenge and opportunity for Drupal.
We also officially launched the first initiative on this track; a new front-end theme for Drupal called "Olivero". This new default theme will give new users a much better first impression of Drupal, as well as reflect the modern backend that Drupal sports under the hood.

Strategic track 3: drive the Open Web

As you may know, 1 out of 40 websites run on Drupal. With that comes a responsibility to help drive the future of the Open Web. By 2022-2025, 4 billion new people will join the internet. We want all people to have access to the open web, and as a result should focus on accessibility, inclusiveness, security, privacy, and interoperability.

Strategic track 4: be the best structured data engine

We've already seen the beginnings of a content explosion, and will experience 300 billion new devices coming online by 2030. By continuing to make Drupal a better and better content repository with a flexible API, we'll be ready for a future with more content, more integrations, more devices, and more channels.

Over the next six months, we'll be opening up these proposed tracks to the community for discussion, and introducing surveys to define the 10 inaugural initiatives for Drupal 9. So far the feedback at DrupalCon Amsterdam has been very positive, but I'm looking forward to much more feedback!

Growing sponsored contributions

In a previous blog post, Balancing Makers and Takers to scale and sustain Open Source, I covered a number of topics related to organizational contribution. Around 1:19:44, my keynote goes into more details, including interviews with several prominent business owners and corporate contributors in the Drupal community.

You can find the different interview snippet belows:

Baddy Sonja Breidert, co-founder of 1xINTERNET, on why it is important to help convert Takers become Makers.
Tiffany Farriss, CEO of Palantir, on what it would take for her organization to contribute substantially more to Drupal.
Mike Lamb, Vice President of Global Digital Platforms at Pfizer, announcing that we are establishing the Contribution Recognition Committee to govern and improve Drupal's contribution credit system.
Thank you

Thank you to everyone who attended Drupalcon Amsterdam and contributed to the event's success. I'm always amazed by the vibrant community that makes Drupal so unique. I'm proud to showcase the impressive work of contributors in my presentations, and congratulate all of the hardworking people that are crucial to building Drupal 8 and 9 behind the scenes. I'm excited to continue to celebrate our work and friendships at future events.

Thanks to the 641 individuals who worked on Drupal 8.8 so far.Thanks to the 243 different individuals who contributed to Drupal 8.8 to date.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Low-code and no-code tools continue to drive the web forward

A version of this article was originally published on Devops.com.

Twelve years ago, I wrote a post called Drupal and Eliminating Middlemen. For years, it was one of the most-read pieces on my blog. Later, I followed that up with a blog post called The Assembled Web, which remains one of the most read posts to date.

The point of both blog posts was the same: I believed that the web would move toward a model where non-technical users could assemble their own sites with little to no coding experience of their own.

This idea isn't new; no-code and low-code tools on the web have been on a 25-year long rise, starting with the first web content management systems in the early 1990s. Since then no-code and low-code solutions have had an increasing impact on the web. Examples include:

WYSIWYG site-builders like Wix and Squarespace
WordPress' Gutenberg
Drupal's new Layout Builder
While this has been a long-run trend, I believe we're only at the beginning.

Trends driving the low-code and no-code movements

According to Forrester Wave: Low-Code Development Platforms for AD&D Professionals, Q1 2019, In our survey of global developers, 23% reported using low-code platforms in 2018, and another 22% planned to do so within a year..

Major market forces driving this trend include a talent shortage among developers, with an estimated one million computer programming jobs expected to remain unfilled by 2020 in the United States alone.

What is more, the developers who are employed are often overloaded with work and struggle with how to prioritize it all. Some of this burden could be removed by low-code and no-code tools.

In addition, the fact that technology has permeated every aspect of our lives — from our smartphones to our smart homes — has driven a desire for more people to become creators. As the founder of Product Hunt Ryan Hoover said in a blog post: As creating things on the internet becomes more accessible, more people will become makers..

But this does not only apply to individuals. Consider this: the typical large organization has to build and maintain hundreds of websites. They need to build, launch and customize these sites in days or weeks, not months. Today and in the future, marketers can embrace no-code and low-code tools to rapidly develop websites.

Abstraction drives innovation

As discussed in my middleman blog post, developers won't go away. Just as the role of the original webmaster has evolved with the advent of web content management systems, the role of web developers is changing with the rise of low-code and no-code tools.

Successful no-code approaches abstract away complexity for web development. This enables less technical people to do things that previously could only by done by developers. And when those abstractions happen, developers often move on to the next area of innovation.

When everyone is a builder, more good things will happen on the web. I was excited about this trend more than 12 years ago, and remain excited today. I'm eager to see the progress no-code and low-code solutions will bring to the web in the next decade.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Drupal Virtual Contribution Hour

Start: 
2019-08-22 11:30 - 13:30 UTC

Organizers: 

AmandeepKaur

gokulnk

mahaveer003

Event type: 

User group meeting

Continuing from where we left, you are welcome to join on 22nd August for Virtual Drupal contribution Hour.
Every month it's great to make some progress in our journey to contribute back to our Drupal community.
Our aim is to make Drupal developers aware of the contribution benefit, how can they enhance their professional and personal skills.
Our focus is to introduce how to commit the first patch to Drupal.org for the people who have introduced to Drupal already. If you are associated with Drupal, now it is your time to pay back the community. Be a Drupal Contributor !!
To continue the growth momentum, as a community we need to work towards building a bigger talent pool of good Drupal Developers. Your benefits:
Professional growth
Faster Deployment
Visibility on Drupal.org
Awareness
Chance of end to end development
Everyone is welcome!! We are looking forward to your contribution to the Drupal world.
RSVP:http://bit.ly/Drupal_Contrib_Hour_August
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1HT4xu5u7NOCwS7yETJBnEar6nvuWyqezI8pZbx-...
Please drop a message, if you have any queries.
Venue: Zoom Meetup(https://zoom.us/j/871165323)
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


Drupal@Cafe #20

Start: 
2019-08-31 11:30 - 15:25 UTC

Organizers: 

adcillc

Anastasiya Dubina

Event type: 

Related event (ie. not Drupal specific)

https://drupal-omsk.timepad.ru/event/1025353/

The 20th Drupal Cafe organized by ADCI Solutions will take place on August, 31.
Drupal Cafe is a meeting for experienced developers. It’s a good opportunity for exchanging knowledge with other participants. This event will be also helpful for those who want to start working with Drupal. At this time we prepared a special agenda for this meeting. We will share our experience and talk about the latest technologies.
When: August, 31th
Where: ADCI Events Hub, Omsk, Dumskaya Str., 7, 5th floor
Time: 11:30
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


Commercial sponsorship and Open Source sustainability

Recently, GitHub announced an initiative called GitHub Sponsors where open source software users can pay contributors for their work directly within GitHub.
There has been quite a bit of debate about whether initiatives like this are good or bad for Open Source.
On the one hand, there is the concern that the commercialization of Open Source could corrupt Open Source communities or harm contributors' intrinsic motivation and quest for purpose.
On the other hand, there is the recognition that commercial sponsorship is often a necessary condition for Open Source sustainability. Many communities have found that to support their growth, as a part of their natural evolution, they need to pay developers or embrace corporate sponsors.
Personally, I believe initiatives like GitHub Sponsors, and others like Open Collective, are a good thing.
It helps not only with the long-term sustainability of Open Source communities, but also improves diversity in Open Source. Underrepresented groups, in particular, don't always have the privilege of free time to contribute to Open Source outside of work hours. Most software developers still have to make a living before they can meet self-actualization. Without funding, Open Source communities risk losing or excluding valuable talent.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Drupal Mumbai Monthly Meetup & Global Training day - June 29, 2019

Start: 
2019-06-29 10:00 - 16:15 Asia/Kolkata

Organizers: 

ashishdalvi

manasiv

rachit_gupta

Event type: 

Training (free or commercial)

https://www.meetup.com/Drupal-Mumbai-Meetup-Group/events/262074759

Hello Drupalers,
We are excited to announce that the “Drupal 8 In a Day” training session will be held on Saturday, June 29th, 2019 on Drupal Global Training Days.
What is Global Training Days?
• Drupal Global Training Days is an exciting initiative from the Drupal community to introduce new and beginning users to Drupal.
• Trainers from companies and local groups around the world make newcomers to the Drupal community feel inspired and empowered to start great work.
• Follow Global Training Days with #DrupalGTD on Twitter (https://twitter.com/hashtag/DrupalGTD?src=hash)
Who Should Attend?
• This training is intended for PHP/Web developers, Career switchers, and Students who wish to begin their career in Drupal.
• This will also benefit the Tech and Business Managers who wish to evaluate Drupal 8 as open source software.
Syllabus/Agenda:
• 11 am to 12:30 pm: Introduction to Drupal CMS
• 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM - Drupal Terminology (Entities, Hooks, Plugins & Events)
• 1:30 - 2:00 PM -Lunch Break
• 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM - Drupal 8 site building
• 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Extending Drupal
• Writing a custom module using Drupal console
• Theming - Twig - Render API
• REST with Drupal 8
• 4:00 PM to 4:30 PM - Drupal Contributions
System requirements:
1. Running Local Server :
* Download and Install MAMP/XAMPP/LAMP on your system.
* Windows User: XAMPP would be preferred (Faster and Easier) Install XAMPP for Windows
* Linux User: LAMP would be preferred. Run following command:apt-get install lamp-server
Gather knowledge about following :
* Content Management System
* Open Source
* PHP
* Mysql
How to register: This event is free but with limited seats. Registration is mandatory. RSVP!!
https://www.meetup.com/Drupal-Mumbai-Meetup-Group/events/262074759
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


Acquia acquires Mautic to create the Open Digital Experience Platform

I'm happy to announce today that Acquia acquired Mautic, an open source marketing automation and campaign management platform.

A couple of decades ago, I was convinced that every organization required a website — a thought that sounds rather obvious now. Today, I am convinced that every organization will need a Digital Experience Platform (DXP).

Having a website is no longer enough: customers expect to interact with brands through their websites, email, chat and more. They also expect these interactions to be relevant and personalized.

If you don't know Mautic, think of it as an alternative to Adobe's Marketo or Salesforce's Marketing Cloud. Just like these solutions, Mautic provides marketing automation and campaign management capabilities. It's differentiated in that it is easier to use, supports one-to-one customer experiences across many channels, integrates more easily with other tools, and is less expensive.

The flowchart style visual campaign builder you saw in the beginning of the Mautic demo video above is one of my favorite features. I love how it allows marketers to combine content, user profiles, events and a decision engine to deliver the best-next action to customers.

Mautic is a relatively young company, but has quickly grown into the largest open source player in the marketing automation space, with more than 200,000 installations. Its ease of use, flexibility and feature completeness has won over many marketers in a very short time: the company's top-line grew almost 400 percent year-over-year, its number of customers tripled, and Mautic won multiple awards for product innovation and customer service.

The acquisition of Mautic accelerates Acquia's product strategy to deliver the only Open Digital Experience Platform:

The pieces that make up a Digital Experience Platform, and how Mautic fits into Acquia's Open Digital Experience Platform. Acquia is strong in content management, personalization, user profile management and commerce (yellow blocks). Mautic adds or improves Acquia's multi-channel delivery, campaign management and journey orchestration capabilities (purple blocks).There are many reasons why we like Mautic, but here are my top 3:

Reason 1: Disrupting the market with "open"

Open Source will disrupt every component of the modern technology stack. It's not a matter of if, it's when.

Just as Drupal disrupted web content management with Open Source, we believe Mautic disrupts marketing automation.

With Mautic, Acquia is now the only open and open source alternative to the expensive, closed, and stagnant marketing clouds.

I'm both proud and excited that Acquia is doubling down on Open Source. Given our extensive open source experience, we believe we can help grow Mautic even faster.

Reason 2: Innovating through integrations

To build an optimal customer experience, marketers need to integrate with different data sources, customer technologies, and bespoke in-house platforms. Instead of buying a suite from a single vendor, most marketers want an open platform that allows for open innovation and unlimited integrations.

Only an open architecture can connect any technology in the marketing stack, and only an open source innovation model can evolve fast enough to offer integrations with thousands of marketing technologies (to date, there are 7,000 vendors in the martech landscape).

Because developers are largely responsible for creating and customizing marketing platforms, marketing technology should meet the needs of both business users and technology architects. Unlike other companies in the space, Mautic is loved by both marketers and developers. With Mautic, Acquia continues to focus on both personas.

Reason 3: The same technology stack and business model

Like Drupal, Mautic is built in PHP and Symfony, and like Drupal, Mautic uses the GNU GPL license. Having the same technology stack has many benefits.

Digital agencies or in-house teams need to deliver integrated marketing solutions. Because both Drupal and Mautic use the same technology stack, a single team of developers can work on both.

The similarities also make it possible for both open source communities to collaborate — while it is not something you can force to happen, it will be interesting to see how that dynamic naturally plays out over time.

Last but not least, our business models are also very aligned. Both Acquia and Mautic were "born in the cloud" and make money by offering subscription- and cloud-based delivery options. This means you pay for only what you need and that you can focus on using the products rather than running and maintaining them.

Mautic offers several commercial solutions:

Mautic Cloud, a fully managed SaaS version of Mautic with premium features not available in Open Source.
For larger organizations, Mautic has a proprietary product called Maestro. Large organizations operate in many regions or territories, and have teams dedicated to each territory. With Maestro, each territory can get its own Mautic instance, but they can still share campaign best-practices, and repeat successful campaigns across territories. It's a unique capability, which is very aligned with the Acquia Cloud Site Factory.
Try Mautic

If you want to try Mautic, you can either install the community version yourself or check out the demo or sandbox environment of Mautic Open Marketing Cloud.

Conclusion

We're very excited to join forces with Mautic. It is such a strategic step for Acquia. Together we'll provide our customers with more freedom, faster innovation, and more flexibility. Open digital experiences are the way of the future.

I've got a lot more to share about the Mautic acquisition, how we plan to integrate Mautic in Acquia's solutions, how we could build bridges between the Drupal and Mautic community, how it impacts the marketplace, and more.

In time, I'll write more about these topics on this blog. In the meantime, please feel free to join DB Hurley, Mautic's founder and CTO, and me in a live Q&A session on Thursday, May 9 at 10am ET. We'll try to answer your questions about Acquia and Mautic.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Welcoming Heather Rocker as Drupal Association Executive Director

The Drupal Association announced today that Heather Rocker has been selected as its next executive director.
This is exciting news because it concludes a seven month search since Megan Sanicki left.
We looked long and hard for someone who could help us grow the global Drupal community by building on its diversity, working with developers and agency partners, and expanding our work with new audiences such as content creators and marketers.
The Drupal Association (including me) believes that Heather can do all of that, and is the best person to lead Drupal into its next phase of growth.
Heather earned her engineering degree from Georgia Tech. She has dedicated much of her career to working with women in technology, both as the CEO of Girls, Inc. of Greater Atlanta and the Executive Director of Women in Technology.
We were impressed not only with her valuable experience with volunteer organizations, but also her work in the private sector with large customers. Most recently, Heather was part of the management team at Systems Evolution, a team of 250 business consultants, where she specialized in sales operations and managed key client relationships.
She is also a robotics fanatic who organizes and judges competitions for children. So, maybe we’ll see some robots roaming around DrupalCon in the future!
As you can tell, Heather will bring a lot of great experience to the Drupal community and I look forward to partnering with her.
Last but not least, I want to thank Tim Lehnen for serving as our Interim Executive Director. He did a fantastic job leading the Drupal Association through this transition.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


State of Drupal presentation (April 2019)

Last week, many Drupalists gathered in Seattle for DrupalCon North America, for what was the largest DrupalCon in history.

As a matter of tradition, I presented my State of Drupal keynote. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 32 minutes) or download a copy of my slides (153 MB).

Making Drupal more diverse and inclusive

DrupalCon Seattle was not only the largest, but also had the most diverse speakers. Nearly 50% of the DrupalCon speakers were from underrepresented groups. This number has been growing year over year, and is something to be proud of.

I actually started my keynote by talking about how we can make Drupal more diverse and inclusive. As one of the largest and most thriving Open Source communities, I believe that Drupal has an obligation to set a positive example.

I talked about how Open Source communities often incorrectly believe that everyone can contribute. Unfortunately, not everyone has equal amounts of free time to contribute. In my keynote, I encouraged individuals and organizations in the Drupal community to strongly consider giving time to underrepresented groups.

Improving diversity is not only good for Drupal and its ecosystem, it's good for people, and it's the right thing to do. Because this topic is so important, I wrote a dedicated blog post about it.

Drupal 8 innovation update

I dedicated a significant portion of my keynote to Drupal 8. In the past year alone, there have been 35% more sites and 48% more stable modules in Drupal 8. Our pace of innovation is increasing, and we've seen important progress in several key areas.

With the release of Drupal 8.7, the Layout Builder will become stable. Drupal's new Layout Builder makes it much easier to build and change one-off page layouts, templated layouts and layout workflows. Best of all, the Layout Builder will be accessible.

Drupal 8.7 also brings a lot of improvements to the Media Library.

We also continue to innovate on headless or decoupled Drupal. The JSON:API module will ship with Drupal 8.7. I believe this not only advances Drupal's leadership in API-first, but sets Drupal up for long-term success.

These are just a few of the new capabilities that will ship with Drupal 8.7. For the complete list of new features, keep an eye out for the release announcement in a few weeks.

Drupal 7 end of life

If you're still on Drupal 7, there is no need to panic. The Drupal community will support Drupal 7 until November 2021 — two years and 10 months from today.

After the community support ends, there will be extended commercial support for a minimum of three additional years. This means that Drupal 7 will be supported for at least five more years, or until 2024.

Upgrading from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8

Upgrading from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 can be a lot of work, especially for large sites, but the benefits outweigh the challenges.

For my keynote, I featured stories from two end-users who upgraded large sites from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 — the State of Georgia and Pegasystems.

The keynote also featured quietone, one of the maintainers of the Migrate API. She talked about the readiness of Drupal 8 migration tools.

Preparing for Drupal 9

As announced a few months ago, Drupal 9 is targeted for June 2020. June 2020 is only 14 months away, so I dedicated a significant amount of my keynote to Drupal 9.

Making Drupal updates easier is a huge, ongoing priority for the community. Thanks to those efforts, the upgrade path to Drupal 9 will be radically easier than the upgrade path to Drupal 8.

In my keynote, I talked about how site owners, Drupal developers and Drupal module maintainers can start preparing for Drupal 9 today. I showed several tools that make Drupal 9 preparation easier. Check out my post on how to prepare for Drupal 9 for details.

Thank you

I'm grateful to be a part of a community that takes such pride in its work. At each DrupalCon, we get to see the tireless efforts of many volunteers that add up to one amazing event. It makes me proud to showcase the work of so many people and organizations in my presentations.

Thank you to all who have made this year's DrupalCon North America memorable. I look forward to celebrating our work and friendships at future events!
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


JSON:API lands in Drupal core

Breaking news: we just committed the JSON:API module to the development branch of Drupal 8.

In other words, JSON:API support is coming to all Drupal 8 sites in just a few short months! 🎉

This marks another important milestone in Drupal's evolution to be an API-first platform optimized for building both coupled and decoupled applications.

With JSON:API, developers or content creators can create their content models in Drupal’s UI without having to write a single line of code, and automatically get not only a great authoring experience, but also a powerful, standards-compliant, web service API to pull that content into JavaScript applications, digital kiosks, chatbots, voice assistants and more.

When you enable the JSON:API module, all Drupal entities such as blog posts, users, tags, comments and more become accessible via the JSON:API web service API. JSON:API provides a standardized API for reading and modifying resources (entities), interacting with relationships between resources (entity references), fetching of only the selected fields (e.g. only the "title" and "author" fields), including related resources to avoid additional requests (e.g. details about the content's author) and filtering, sorting and paginating collections of resources.

In addition to being incredibly powerful, JSON:API is easy to learn and use and uses all the tooling we already have available to test, debug and scale Drupal sites.

Drupal's JSON:API implementation was years in the making

Development of the JSON:API module started in May 2016 and reached a stable 1.0 release in May 2017. Most of the work was driven by a single developer partially in his free time: Mateu Aguiló Bosch (e0ipso).

After soliciting input and consulting others, I felt JSON:API belonged in Drupal core. I first floated this idea in July 2016, became more convinced in December 2016 and recommended that we standardize on it in October 2017.

This is why at the end of 2017, I asked Wim Leers and Gabe Sullice — as part of their roles at Acquia — to start devoting the majority of their time to getting JSON:API to a high level of stability.

Wim and Gabe quickly became key contributors alongside Mateu. They wrote hundreds of tests and added missing features to make sure we guarantee strict compliance with the JSON:API specification.

A year later, their work culminated in a JSON:API 2.0 stable release on January 7th, 2019. The 2.0 release marked the start of the module's move to Drupal core. After rigorous reviews and more improvements, the module was finally committed to core earlier today.

From beginning to end, it took 28 months, 450 commits, 32 releases, and more than 5500 test runs.

The best JSON:API implementation in existence

The JSON:API module is almost certainly the most feature-complete and easiest-to-use JSON:API implementation in existence.

The Drupal JSON:API implementation supports every feature of the JSON:API 1.0 specification out-of-the-box. Every Drupal entity (a resource object in JSON:API terminology) is automatically made available through JSON:API. Existing access controls for both reading and writing are respected. Both translations and revisions of entities are also made available. Furthermore, querying entities (filtering resource collections in JSON:API terminology) is possible without any configuration (e.g. setting up a "Drupal View"), which means front-end developers can get started on their work right away.

What is particularly rewarding is that all of this was made possible thanks to Drupal's data model and introspection capabilities. Drupal’s decade-old Entity API, Field API, Access APIs and more recent Configuration and Typed Data APIs exist as an incredibly robust foundation for making Drupal’s data available via web service APIs. This is not to be understated, as it makes the JSON:API implementation robust, deeply integrated and elegant.

I want to extend a special thank you to the many contributors that contributed to the JSON:API module and that helped make it possible for JSON:API to be added to Drupal 8.7.

Special thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia) and Gabe Sullice (Acquia) for co-authoring this blog post and to Mateu Aguiló Bosch (e0ipso) (Lullabot), Preston So (Acquia), Alex Bronstein (Acquia) for their feedback during the writing process.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


What is Drupal? An Introduction to Drupal 8 in Ottawa

Start: 
2019-04-18 09:00 - 12:30 UTC

Organizers: 

pixelite

Event type: 

Training (free or commercial)

https://evolvingweb.ca/training/what-drupal-introduction-drupal-8

What is Drupal? Drupal is a popular, open source content management system. It powers websites for governments, NGOs, communities, and businesses around the world. Drupal 8, the newest version, has recently been released and there are many exciting new features for end users, site builders, and developers.
If you're considering a platform for your next web development project, this half-day training session is a great opportunity to learn more about what Drupal has to offer.
This session is designed for project managers, decision makers, site builders and developers who are new to Drupal and want to learn the basics. Evolving Web also offers more advanced trainings on a variety of Drupal topics.
Agenda:
9:00am - Coffee + Refreshments Served
9:15am - Welcome + Introductions
9:30am - Overview of Drupal 8 Features
9:45am - What You Can Build with Drupal
10:00am - Hands-on Demos: Drupal Content Management + Site Building
11:30am - Overview of Backend Functionality + Custom Development
11:45am - Meet the Drupal Community! Open Source + Community Involvement
12:00am - QA + Open Discussion
The event is free but an Eventbrite ticket is required as places are limited
For more trainings please visit out website : https://evolvingweb.ca/training
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed


Headless CMS: REST vs JSON:API vs GraphQL

The web used to be server-centric in that web content management systems managed data and turned it into HTML responses. With the rise of headless architectures a portion of the web is becoming server-centric for data but client-centric for its presentation; increasingly, data is rendered into HTML in the browser.

This shift of responsibility has given rise to JavaScript frameworks, while on the server side, it has resulted in the development of JSON:API and GraphQL to better serve these JavaScript applications with content and data.

In this blog post, we will compare REST, JSON:API and GraphQL. First, we'll look at an architectural, CMS-agnostic comparison, followed by evaluating some Drupal-specific implementation details.

It's worth noting that there are of course lots of intricacies and "it depends" when comparing these three approaches. When we discuss REST, we mean the "typical REST API" as opposed to one that is extremely well-designed or following a specification (not REST as a concept). When we discuss JSON:API, we're referring to implementations of the JSON:API specification. Finally, when we discuss GraphQL, we're referring to GraphQL as it used in practice. Formally, it is only a query language, not a standard for building APIs.

The architectural comparison should be useful for anyone building decoupled applications regardless of the foundation they use because the qualities we will evaluate apply to most web projects.

To frame our comparisons, let's establish that most developers working with web services care about the following qualities:

Request efficiency: retrieving all necessary data in a single network round trip is essential for performance. The size of both requests and responses should make efficient use of the network.
API exploration and schema documentation: the API should be quickly understandable and easily discoverable.
Operational simplicity: the approach should be easy to install, configure, run, scale and secure.
Writing data: not every application needs to store data in the content repository, but when it does, it should not be significantly more complex than reading.
We summarized our conclusions in the table below, but we discuss each of these four categories (or rows in the table) in more depth below. If you aggregate the colors in the table, you see that we rank JSON:API above GraphQL and GraphQL above REST.

REST
JSON:API
GraphQL
Request efficiency
Poor; multiple requests are needed to satisfy common needs. Responses are bloated.
Excellent; a single request is usually sufficient for most needs. Responses can be tailored to return only what is required.
Excellent; a single request is usually sufficient for most needs. Responses only include exactly what was requested.
Documentation, API explorability and schema
Poor; no schema, not explorable.
Acceptable; generic schema only; links and error messages are self-documenting.
Excellent; precise schema; excellent tooling for exploration and documentation.
Operational simplicity
Acceptable; works out of the box with CDNs and reverse proxies; few to no client-side libraries required.
Excellent; works out of the box with CDNs and reverse proxies, no client-side libraries needed, but many are available and useful.
Poor; extra infrastructure is often necessary client side libraries are a practical necessity, specific patterns required to benefit from CDNs and browser caches.
Writing data
Acceptable; HTTP semantics give some guidance but how specifics left to each implementation, one write per request.
Excellent; how writes are handled is clearly defined by the spec, one write per request, but multiple writes is being added to the specification.
Poor; how writes are handled is left to each implementation and there are competing best practices, it's possible to execute multiple writes in a single request.

If you're not familiar with JSON:API or GraphQL, I recommend you watch the following two short videos. They will provide valuable context for the remainder of this blog post:

A 3-minute demo of Drupal's GraphQL implementation.
A 5-minute demo of Drupal's JSON:API implementation.
Request efficiency

Most REST APIs tend toward the simplest implementation possible: a resource can only be retrieved from one URI. If you want to retrieve article 42, you have to retrieve it from https://example.com/article/42. If you want to retrieve article 42 and article 72, you have to perform two requests; one to https://example.com/article/42 and one to https://example.com/article/72. If the article's author information is stored in a different content type, you have to do two additional requests, say to https://example.com/author/3 and https://example.com/author/7. Furthermore, you can't send these requests until you've requested, retrieved and parsed the article requests (you wouldn't know the author IDs otherwise).

Consequently, client-side applications built on top of basic REST APIs tend to need many successive requests to fetch their data. Often, these requests can't be sent until earlier requests have been fulfilled, resulting in a sluggish experience for the website visitor.

GraphQL and JSON:API were developed to address the typical inefficiency of REST APIs. Using JSON:API or GraphQL, you can use a single request to retrieve both article 42 and article 72, along with the author information for each. It simplifies the developer experience, but more importantly, it speeds up the application.

Finally, both JSON:API and GraphQL have a solution to limit response sizes. A common complaint against typical REST APIs is that their responses can be incredibly verbose; they often respond with far more data than the client needs. This is both annoying and inefficient.

GraphQL eliminates this by requiring the developer to explicitly add each desired resource field to every query. This makes it difficult to over-fetch data but easily leads to very large GraphQL queries, making (cacheable) GET requests impossible.

JSON:API solves this with the concept of sparse fieldsets or lists of desired resource fields. These behave in much the same fashion as GraphQL does, however, when they're omitted JSON:API will typically return all fields. An advantage, though, is that when a JSON:API query gets too large, sparse fieldsets can be omitted so that the request remains cacheable.

REST
JSON:API
GraphQL
Multiple data objects in a single response
Usually; but every implementation is different (for Drupal: custom "REST Export" view or custom REST plugin needed).
Yes
Yes
Embed related data (e.g. the author of each article)
No
Yes
Yes
Only needed fields of a data object
No
Yes; servers may choose sensible defaults, developers must be diligent to prevent over-fetching.
Yes; strict, but eliminates over-fetching, at the extreme, it can lead to poor cacheability.
Documentation, API explorability and schema

As a developer working with web services, you want to be able to discover and understand the API quickly and easily: what kinds of resources are available, what fields does each of them have, how are they related, etc. But also, if this field is a date or time, what machine-readable format is the date or time specified in? Good documentation and API exploration can make all the difference.

REST
JSON:API
GraphQL
Auto-generated documentation
Depends; if using the OpenAPI standard.
Depends; if using the OpenAPI standard (formerly, Swagger).
Yes; various tools available.
Interactivity
Poor; navigable links rarely available.
Acceptable; observing available fields and links in its responses enable exploration of the API.
Excellent; autocomplete feature, instant results or compilation errors, complete and contextual documentation.
Validatable and programmable schema.
Depends; if using the OpenAPI standard.
Depends; the JSON:API specification defines a generic schema, but a reliable field-level schema is not yet available.
Yes; a complete and reliable schema is provided (with very few exceptions).
GraphQL has superior API exploration thanks to GraphiQL (demonstrated in the video above), an in-browser IDE of sorts, which lets developers iteratively construct a query. As the developer types the query out, likely suggestions are offered and can be auto-completed. At any time, the query can be run and GraphiQL will display real results alongside the query. This provides immediate, actionable feedback to the query builder. Did they make a typo? Does the response look like what was desired? Additionally, documentation can be summoned into a flyout, when additional context is needed.

On the other hand, JSON:API is more self-explanatory: APIs can be explored with nothing more than a web browser. From within the browser, you can browse from one resource to another, discover its fields, and more. So, if you just want to debug or try something out, JSON:API is usable with nothing more than cURL or your browser. Or, you can use Postman (demonstrated in the video above) — a standalone environment for developing on top of an any HTTP-based API. Constructing complex queries requires some knowledge, however, and that is where GraphQL's GraphiQL shines compared to JSON:API.

Operational simplicity

We use the term operational simplicity to encompass how easy it is to install, configure, run, scale and secure each of the solutions.

The table should be self-explanatory, though it's important to make a remark about scalability. To scale a REST-based or JSON:API-based web service so that it can handle a large volume of traffic, you can use the same approach websites (and Drupal) already use, including reverse proxies like Varnish or a CDN. To scale GraphQL, you can't rely on HTTP caching as with REST or JSON:API without persisted queries. Persisted queries are not part of the official GraphQL specification but they are a widely-adopted convention amongst GraphQL users. They essentially store a query on the server, assign it an ID and permit the client to get the result of the query using a GET request with only the ID. Persisted queries add more operational complexity, and it also means the architecture is no longer fully decoupled — if a client wants to retrieve different data, server-side changes are required.

REST
JSON:API
GraphQL
Scalability: additional infrastructure requirements
Excellent; same as a regular website (Varnish, CDN, etc).
Excellent; same as a regular website (Varnish, CDN, etc).
Usually poor; only the simplest queries can use GET requests; to reap the full benefit of GraphQL, servers needs their own tooling.
Tooling ecosystem
Acceptable; lots of developer tools available, but for the best experience they need to be customized for the implementation.
Excellent; lots of developer tools available; tools don't need to be implementation-specific.
Excellent; lots of developer tools available; tools don't need to be implementation-specific.
Typical points of failure
Fewer; server, client.
Fewer; server, client.
Many; server, client, client-side caching, client and build tooling.
Writing data

For most REST APIs and JSON:API, writing data is as easy as fetching it: if you can read information, you also know how to write it. Instead of using the GET HTTP request type you use POST and PATCH requests. JSON:API improves on typical REST APIs by eliminating differences between implementations. There is just one way to do things and that enabled better, generic tooling and less time spent on server-side details.

The nature of GraphQL's write operations (called mutations) means that you must write custom code for each write operation; unlike JSON:API the specification, GraphQL doesn't prescribe a single way of handling write operations to resources, so there are many competing best practices. In essence, the GraphQL specification is optimized for reads, not writes.

On the other hand, the GraphQL specification supports bulk/batch operations automatically for the mutations you've already implemented, whereas the JSON:API specification does not. The ability to perform batch write operations can be important. For example, in our running example, adding a new tag to an article would require two requests; one to create the tag and one to update the article. That said, support for bulk/batch writes in JSON:API is on the specification's roadmap.

REST
JSON:API
GraphQL
Writing data
Acceptable; every implementation is different. No bulk support.
Excellent; JSON:API prescribes a complete solution for handling writes. Bulk operations are coming soon.
Poor; GraphQL supports bulk/batch operations, but writes can be tricky to design and implement. There are competing conventions.
Drupal-specific considerations

Up to this point we have provided an architectural and CMS-agnostic comparison; now we also want to highlight a few Drupal-specific implementation details. For this, we can look at the ease of installation, automatically generated documentation, integration with Drupal's entity and field-level access control systems and decoupled filtering.

Drupal 8's REST module is practically impossible to set up without the contributed REST UI module, and its configuration can be daunting. Drupal's JSON:API module is far superior to Drupal's REST module at this point. It is trivial to set up: install it and you're done; there's nothing to configure. The GraphQL module is also easy to install but does require some configuration.

Client-generated collection queries allow a consumer to filter an application's data down to just what they're interested in. This is a bit like a Drupal View except that the consumer can add, remove and control all the filters. This is almost always a requirement for public web services, but it can also make development more efficient because creating or changing a listing doesn't require server-side configuration changes.

Drupal's REST module does not support client-generated collection queries. It requires a "REST Views display" to be setup by a site administrator and since these need to be manually configured in Drupal; this means a client can't craft its own queries with the filters it needs.

JSON:API and GraphQL, clients are able to perform their own content queries without the need for server-side configuration. This means that they can be truly decoupled: changes to the front end don't always require a back-end configuration change.

These client-generated queries are a bit simpler to use with the JSON:API module than they are with the GraphQL module because of how each module handles Drupal's extensive access control mechanisms. By default JSON:API ensures that these are respected by altering the incoming query. GraphQL instead requires the consumer to have permission to simply bypass access restrictions.

Most projects using GraphQL that cannot grant this permission use persisted queries instead of client-generated queries. This means a return to a more traditional Views-like pattern because the consumer no longer has complete control of the query's filters. To regain some of the efficiencies of client-generated queries, the creation of these persisted queries can be automated using front-end build tooling.

REST
JSON:API
GraphQL
Ease of installation and configuration
Poor; requires contributed module REST UI, easy to break clients by changing configuration.
Excellent; zero configuration!
Poor; more complex to use, may require additional permissions, configuration or custom code.
Automatically generated documentation
Acceptable; requires contributed module OpenAPI.
Acceptable; requires contributed module OpenAPI.
Excellent; GraphQL Voyager included.
Security: content-level access control (entity and field access)
Excellent; content-level access control respected.
Excellent; content-level access control respected, even in queries.
Acceptable; some use cases require the consumer to have permission to bypass all entity and/or field access.
Decoupled filtering (client can craft queries without server-side intervention)
No
Yes
Depends; only in some setups and with additional tooling/infrastructure.
What does this mean for Drupal's roadmap?

Drupal grew up as a traditional web content management system but has since evolved for this API-first world and industry analysts are praising us for it. As Drupal's project lead, I've been talking about adding out-of-the-box support for both JSON:API and GraphQL for a while now. In fact, I've been very bullish about GraphQL since 2015. My optimism was warranted; GraphQL is undergoing a meteoric rise in interest across the web development industry.

Based on this analysis, we rank JSON:API above GraphQL and GraphQL above REST. As such, I want to change my recommendation for Drupal 8 core. Instead of adding both JSON:API and GraphQL to Drupal 8 core, I believe only JSON:API should be added. While Drupal's GraphQL implementation is fantastic, I no longer recommend that we add GraphQL to Drupal 8 core.

On the four qualities by which we evaluated the REST, JSON:API and GraphQL modules, JSON:API has outperformed its contemporaries. Its web standards-based approach, its ability to handle reads and writes out of the box, its security model and its ease of operation make it the best choice for Drupal core. Additionally, where JSON:API underperformed, I believe that we have a real opportunity to contribute back to the specification. In fact, one of the JSON:API module's maintainers and co-authors of this blog post, Gabe Sullice (Acquia), recently became a JSON:API specification editor himself.

This decision does not mean that you can't or shouldn't use GraphQL with Drupal. While I believe JSON:API covers the majority of use cases, there are valid use cases where GraphQL is a great fit. I'm happy that Drupal is endowed with such a vibrant contributed module ecosystem that provides so many options to Drupal's users.

I'm excited to see where both the JSON:API specification and Drupal's implementation of it goes in the coming months and years. As a first next step, we're preparing the JSON:API to be added to Drupal 8.7.

Special thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia) and Gabe Sullice (Acquia) for co-authoring this blog post and to Preston So (Acquia) and Alex Bronstein (Acquia) for their feedback during the writing process.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Drupal Mumbai Monthly Meetup & Global Training day - Feb 23, 2019

Start: 
2019-02-23 11:00 - 16:00 Asia/Kolkata

Organizers: 

ashishdalvi

manasiv

rachit_gupta

Event type: 

Training (free or commercial)

https://www.meetup.com/Drupal-Mumbai-Meetup-Group/events/258785450/?isFi...

Hello Drupalers,
We are excited to announce that the “Drupal 8 In a Day” training session will be held on Saturday, Feb 23rd, 2019 on Drupal Global Training Days.
What is Global Training Days?
• Drupal Global Training Days is an exciting initiative from the Drupal community to introduce new and beginning users to Drupal.
• Trainers from companies and local groups around the world make newcomers to the Drupal community feel inspired and empowered to start great work.
• Follow Global Training Days with #DrupalGTD on Twitter (https://twitter.com/hashtag/DrupalGTD?src=hash)
Who Should Attend?
• This training is intended for PHP/Web developers, Career switchers, and Students who wish to begin their career in Drupal.
• This will also benefit the Tech and Business Managers who wish to evaluate Drupal 8 as open source software.
Syllabus/Agenda:
• 11 am to 12:30 pm: Introduction to Drupal CMS
• 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM - Drupal Terminology (Entities, Hooks, Plugins & Events)
• 1:30 - 2:00 PM - Lunch Break
• 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM - Drupal 8 site building
• 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Extending Drupal
• Writing a custom module using Drupal console
• Theming - Twig - Render API
• REST with Drupal 8
• 4:00 PM to 4:30 PM - Drupal Contributions
Bring along your laptop to make the best use of this workshop.
How to register: This event is free but with limited seats. Registration is mandatory. RSVP!!
Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed