design company Fayetteville NC

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


design company Waco TX

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


design company Garden Grove CA

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


design company Richmond VA

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


What Works Now: 13 Content Marketing Secrets from Kissmetrics, WordStream, Unbounce, KlientBoost, Close.io & More

“Content Shock” was first discussed in 2014. Mark Schaefer’s prescient concept that there was too much content to read. More supply than demand.
If consumers were struggling to keep up in 2014… they must be completely overwhelmed today.
The content marketing bar has never been higher. People are pumping out more awesome stuff than ever before. Faster and more frequently.

So what are the pros doing? The best and brightest. The ones who’re on the front lines, slogging it out every single day. The content marketers themselves and content leaders within today’s leading marketing technology companies.
Thankfully, they’re also very nice and happily agreed to share their insight.

Here’s what works now in content marketing according to Aaron Orendorff, Zach Bulygo, Claire Suellentrop, Edward Dennis, Elisa Gabbert, Casey Armstrong, Bill Widmer, Brian Sun, Amy Wood, Kaleigh Moore, Andy Crestodina, Johnathan Dane, and Steli Efti.
Welcome to the Content Marketing Hunger Games
‘Thin content’ refers to any low value, scraped, or duplicated content.
It was squarely in Google’s crosshair several years ago with the Panda algorithm update.
The theory, at the time, was that web pages needed at least 300-500 unique words in order to be ‘valuable’ (and therefore, not ‘thin’).
For years, 500-odd words was the default blog post length. Easy. Only took an hour or two to crank out and you got on with your day.
Except something happened. Supply vs. demand. Everybody started doing the content thing. The Inbound Marketing thing. And that level slowly edged up.
Average word counts rose to ~800 in 2014 and then over ~1,000 in 2016 according to Orbit Media’s blogger survey. Then Brian Dean and Eric Van Buskirk analyzed over a million search results and found the average first page result had over 1,890 words.
But it’s not just length that’s gotten exponentially more difficult.
HubSpot was one of the first B2B sites publishing multiple times a day. Because it worked. Even in 2015, where they found:
“Companies that published 16+ blog posts per month got almost 3.5X more traffic than companies that published between 0 – 4 monthly posts.”

Then there’s the complexity, detail, nuance, statistical evidence, images, gifs, video, skyscrapers, and more.
The time it takes to create a piece of content has risen proportionally. Over three hours to scrape together a measly 1,000 words. While longer pieces can take half-to-a-full day to complete.

(image source)
Content marketing has gone from a cheap, easy, ‘free’ way to attract attention, to a cutthroat, winner-takes-all, heavily-funded marketing strategy.
Want attention? To rank and increase brand visibility? To keep those rankings and drive new leads?
Chances are, your stuff ain’t good enough. The Content Marketing Hunger Games (I’m trademarking that ASAP) will eat you up and spit you out. You gotta first take a step back, figure out where things are headed, and prepare yourself for the long road ahead.
It’s a marathon, not a sprint. A muther-effing ultramarathon. And your journey starts here.
Begin at the Beginning with Customer Research
Aaron Orendorff owns “conversion optimization” online.
At least, that would be the impression you’d get if you tried to read anything about the subject.
According to his recent Unbounce piece (which has already racked up over 2,000 shares after only being published for a week or so), that includes:

The number one ranked article for “conversion rate optimization principles”
The number one ranked article for “wrong with conversion rate optimization”
The number one ranked article for “optimize online copy”
The most shared article for “CRO marketing”

What’s the catch?
He admits that he’s not a “conversion optimizer” and is instead “faking it”. (And doing one hell of a job at that, apparently.)
I’m stealing his lead here. Misappropriating it entirely. But I think it still works. Because the reason he’s been able to run away with “conversion optimization” headlines (rankings and credibility) is because he understands exactly who his audience is and what they’re looking for.
Not in a primitive, shallow way like most companies. But on a deeper, personal, and intimate level.
Take it away, Aaron.
Aaron Orendorff, IconiContent
Aaron Orendorff is the Founder of IconiContent and a contributor at Mashable, Entrepreneur, Huffington Post, Lifehacker, Inc., Fast Company, Business Insider, Success Magazine, The Next Web, Content Marketing Institute, Copyblogger, MarketingProfs, ConversionXL, Unbounce & more. (Jesus, is that all Aaron?!)
This next year is all about personas and funnels. Why? Because content for content’s sake — even popular content — is a seductive myth. What matters is creating content tailor-made for decision makers. B2C this matters. B2B it’s life or death. On top of that, content has to fit into the buying cycle of real humans and real organizations. The only way to do this is by creating data-driven personas and locating where in your funnel each particular piece of content can meet needs and catapult your audience into the next step. All this has to happen before you ideate and put finger to keyboard.”
Zach Bulygo, Kissmetrics
Zach Bulygo is the Blog Manager at Kissmetrics.
 
The most important thing you can do is have a great understanding of who your target market is. Understand what their job is like, what challenges they have, and how you can help them through your content. The best way to do this is from a list of “target topics” that you know your target audience is interested in, then sticking to those target topics in every new piece of content you produce.”
Claire Suellentrop, Love Your Customers
Claire Suellentrop is a SaaS Messaging & Conversion Expert at Love Your Customers.
 
Many marketing teams put all their effort into acquisition-focused content, but overlook how crucial content is during new user activation.
Imagine picking up a tasty-looking frozen pizza at the grocery store, flipping the box over, and realizing…hey, there are no instructions on this thing. If you have no idea how to bake it properly, chances are, you’ll put the pizza back and move on.
While acquiring signups is a valuable goal, shoving those signups into a subpar onboarding flow — without adequate content to guide trial users to success — is a recipe for low trial > paid conversion rates.
So, my thoughts on content strategy in 2017? Devote half your efforts to acquisition content, and the other half to activation content. Both types can often be tweaked and repurposed to fill the other funnel, and when you give the two equal attention, you set yourself up for a much higher ROI on your acquisition efforts.”
Edward Dennis, Core DNA
Edward Dennis is in Digital Marketing at Core dna and bwired. (Fun fact: His legal name is just “Dennis”. True story. Like Prince or Madonna.)
 

Niche wise: start narrow.
Branding wise: cultivate a “Us vs. Them” movement

Here’s what I mean by start narrow. Whatever your industry is; whether it be agencies, removalists, bodybuilding; there are a lot of “underserved” sub-niches. Nerd Fitness is a good example; it focuses on a sub-niche in the fitness industry – nerds who want to get fit. So, start by identifying a few underserved sub-niches in your industry. There are a bunch of how to build a startup related sites and content. But there aren’t a lot of resources on how to build a startup for people with typical 9-5 jobs.
Re branding/marketing, people want something or someone they can look up and relate to. FrankBody is a good example; for those who didn’t know, they sell coffee-based scrub. FrankBody is NOT for everyone – that’s how they intend it to be – and they’re proud of it. They’re for young, digital-native women who are not afraid to show their skin, rub coffee grounds all over their body, and believe in natural health products. With this “Us vs. Them” movement, you’re basically creating a sense of purpose for those who “fit in” and make everyone else worry they’re being left out – FOMO, anyone?
I’ve yet to see a company that’s successfully created this “Us vs. Them” mentality better than FrankBody. A quick search on Instagram for #frankeffect and #letsbefrank will prove this.”
Upgrade Your Existing Assets to Leverage Past Success
Most companies focus exclusively on their latest content. The stuff that got published this week or this month. 
Yet when you open up Google Analytics and search for your most popular content, something surprising will happen.
You’ll notice that in most cases, your most popular content over the past few weeks that has brought in the most visitors might actually be from a year or two ago.
Why?
SEO rewards compound growth. The longer something’s been around, the more authoritative it tends to be. The longer it has to be shared, read, bookmarked, and linked to. And so each piece will continue to ‘snowball’; delivering more and more returns like the way compounding interest works.
And that’s exactly where some of the biggest content marketers are starting.
Elisa Gabbert, WordStream
Elisa Gabbert is the Senior SEO & Content Marketing Manager at WordStream, where she manages the WordStream blog. Follow her on Twitter at @egabbert.
 
– We leverage data from both our client base and our free tools whenever possible to provide original data resources. People are hungry for data and these resources end up being our most linkable assets-stuff like our industry benchmarks for AdWords and Facebook Ads, or data on how Expanded Text Ads affect ad KPI’s for early adopters. It’s not a new strategy, but we’re not slowing down.
– I’m actively optimizing for Google’s featured snippets whenever possible, as we’ve seen great organic CTR and traffic from content that earns the feature snippet. There are plenty of little technical things you can do to improve your chances, but the #1 thing you need to nail to get a featured snippet is intent match-make sure you’re giving searchers what they really want when they type in the query you’re targeting.
– We’re also proactively updating old content so we don’t lose rankings when new competitors roll around. This involves making sure all the information and images are up-to-date, and optimizing for engagement versus the more shallow SEO that used to work just fine in the old days.”
Casey Armstrong, BigCommerce
Casey Armstrong is the Director of Marketing at BigCommerce.
 
Optimize 1) current content that is close to ranking well and will drive significant traffic and 2) content that is driving quality traffic, but not turning into new customers or revenue. People often chase the bright shiny object before optimizing what they currently have, which the latter often bares fruit much faster.
I’ll stay very high-level, but for #1, figure out how can you best optimize your quality content that you already poured so much time into so that it ranks better or gets better distribution. I’ve seen this time and time again where you can increase traffic via SEO by 10% or 50% or 100% by fixing what you already have. For #2, figure out how can you create lead magnets or reasons for people to move deeper into your funnel from your current traffic before building more of what is likely the same content you’ve been doing.”
Bill Widmer, Content Marketing Consultant
Bill Widmer is a content marketing consultant and freelance writer for Social Media Examiner, HootSuite, SEJ, and more.
 
“The standards for content are getting higher and higher as more businesses hop on the bandwagon. This is actually great news for those who are serious about making it work – if you can create something truly awesome, you can stand out.
However, the content itself is only one-half of content marketing. Otherwise, it would just be called blogging.
Getting eyeballs on your content is getting harder as well. The strategies I’ve seen the most success with are networking and SEO. The bigger my network, the more people share my content. The better my SEO, the higher I rank on search engines.
And, of course, backlinking is still as important today as ever. Guest posting and (cover your ears, white-hatters) buying links are very prominent right now.”
Brian Sun, AutopilotHQ
Brian Sun is the Senior Manager, Content Marketing at AutopilotHQ.
 
At a high-level, I want to take a compounding approach to content so that everything our team creates builds on top of the content before it. How can blog posts be batched together into a series to show up higher in search results?
How can automated lead nurturing campaigns extend the life of recent articles? What recurring social media updates can we set up to run forever because the content is timeless?
Compounding our efforts is the name of the game in 2017.”
Level Up New Content in Every Way Possible
Only after understanding your audience and leveraging past success are you ready to start cranking out new stuff.
The reason?
The ‘bar’ for new content has been raised in almost every facet imaginable. From the initial hook and topic idea, all the way through the depth, complexity, and production.
Many of the web’s top marketing companies, like Unbounce, pre-screen content ideas and don’t even give it the time of day if it doesn’t scream 10x.
Amy Wood, Unbounce
Amy Wood is a Content Writer and Editor at Unbounce.
 
The last thing I want to do is contribute to the noise. If it’s not original, if it’s not valuable, if it’s not educational, it need not be a priority. This means taking a hard look at our prioritization process and accepting that — despite what I was told when I first started blogging — publishing top-quality content less frequently is often more valuable than publishing medium-quality content several times per week.”
Kaleigh Moore
Kaleigh Moore is a freelance writer for Entrepreneur and Inc. Magazine and helps create written content for growing SaaS companies like Citrix, Campaign Monitor, WhenIWork, and more.
 
I’m focusing on creating more in-depth content for clients that teaches an actionable how-to rather than reporting on high-level trends or facts. The reason: There’s far more value for the reader in this type of content.”
Andy Crestodina, Orbit Media
Andy Crestodina is a co-founder and the Strategic Director of Orbit Media, an award-winning 38-person web design company in Chicago.
 

10x Formats: More images, more video
Total Originality: publishing research, becoming the primary source
Maximum Depth: Longer, more detailed, more thorough and more mega-roundups (which I don’t really like, personally)  Brad’s note: <- Ironic, eh?
Headline Hackers: Better use of emotional triggers and power words
Social Aggression: Keeping things in heavy social rotation for longer”

Doubling Down on What You Know Works
Inside sales tool, Close.io, originally started as Elastic, Inc., an outsourced sales team for startups.
In other words, they’re sales experts. Well versed in the latest Predictable Revenue, cold calling 2.0 tactics of referral emails and more.
And yet, they haven’t even bothered with doing outbound sales to grow Close.io.
KlientBoost is a fast-growing PPC agency that recently hit the $300k/month mark in only ~two years.
And yet, they don’t run many ads for their own company, either.
Instead, both Close.io and KlientBoost rely on content marketing. The massive success speaks for itself.
Here’s how they’ve been able to use content marketing to grow their companies so quickly that they haven’t even needed to lift a finger in their own respective specialties.
Johnathan Dane, KlientBoost
Johnathan Dane is the Founder and CEO of KlientBoost.
 
We’ve been able to have a strong consistency with our blog, so we’re going to expand our content efforts to video and do the same thing we’ve done with our content: trying to outdo everyone on the topic we choose to focus on.”
Steli Efti, Close.io
Steli Efti is the CEO of Close.io
 
Our content strategy for 2017: Do more of what worked in 2016 (and ’15, and ’14, and ’13…). There are many trends you can follow, many opportunities you could pursue. But you’ll be better off to focus on one thing that plays to your strengths. What enables you to deliver maximum value to your audience? Double down on that. I see too many people opportunistically jumping on every up-and-coming new channel. Stop listening to the experts and start listening to your audience.”
Conclusion
The content marketing bar has never been higher.
Supply has far outstripped demand. To the point that now you’re in a winner-takes-all race to top SERPs, get shares, and grab eyeballs.
Thankfully, the experts who’re doing it on a daily basis have stripped away the guess work for everyone else.
The first step is to deeply understand what your audience is looking for. What motives them, scares them, and builds trust with them. Then before cranking out anything new, go back and upgrade your existing content assets, first.
Only after leveraging past success are you ready to move forward and create new 10x content that’s original, valuable, insightful, in-depth, data-driven, and perfectly produced.
Once you’ve begun to reach those stratospheric heights, don’t stop.
Find out what works best for you. What’s moving the needle. And then double down as much as possible to the exclusion of other hot trends, channels, tactics, or growth hacks.
Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


The Unnecessary Fragmentation of Design Jobs

Photo by Sanwal DeenHey there, tech designer person. Have you noticed the increasing number of vague specializations we’ve invented for ourselves?Here are a few I grabbed from a job board 10 minutes ago.UX DesignerUX/UI DesignerUI DesignerGraphic Designer (UX & UI focus)Visual DesignerDigital DesignerProduct DesignerPresentation DesignerFront End DesignerWeb DesignerBleh. What’s the difference between UX and UX/UI and UI? Isn’t Product also UX/UI? Isn’t a Front End a UI? What’s a Graphic Designer with UX & UI Focus? And isn’t all of this Visual/Digital design?For an outsider, the differences are extremely subtle. I’ve been talking to a lot of industry newcomers lately, and they’re almost unanimously confused. They’re struggling to gain the right experience and make portfolios to match our foggy job definitions.Even worse, the companies hiring seem equally puzzled. One designer told me he took a UX job at a startup, and then his new boss asked him to explain what UX is about — after he had already been hired to do it!UX AND UI, WHY OH WHYThis must be happening because everyone can barely keep up with the demand for design work. Companies are racing to fill seats and execute hastily-defined design processes without bothering to question if it’s all necessary for their particular business.If your company does that, you might find yourself in a game of Designer Hot Potato like this one:Bob’s good at customer research, so he’s on UX. He’ll make some personas and get a bunch of post-it notes on the wall right away.Then we’ll get everyone together to look at the post-its and move them around.Then we’ll write down ideas and ask Natalie to make wireframes. She’s our UX/UI person.Then she’ll hand those over to Beth, our UI designer, who’s good at turning wireframes into a high fidelity UI mockup.Then Beth will hand that over to Steven, our Front End person, to make a prototype.Then we’ll try it to figure out what we did wrong, and check back with Bob on the post-its again. TO THE POST-ITS!!!This is surely good for 3M’s office supplies revenue, but as a creative process it sounds painful to me.I’ve never had a job quite like that.Before I joined Basecamp, I was always a lone wolf — the only designery person at a small business or government org—so I had to figure everything out myself. I had to talk to people, learn about the problems they were having, come up with ideas, create a good-looking solution, write words, and build the UI piece of the final product.It was tough, and it took years of practice to become competent at any of it. But I loved the diversity of the work and the exciting potential for new discoveries.Recently John Maeda’s Design in Tech Report for 2017 suggested a name for my kind of role: Computational Designer.These computational designers exist in a hazy middle ground — not quite pure engineers, not quite pure designers — but their hybrid status is increasingly attractive to technology companies. …The most successful designers will be those who can work with intangible materials — code, words, and voice. (via WIRED)I dig this idea, but I don’t think we even need the word “Computational.” I think the software industry has been overthinking this, and what John describes is just Design.Design (with a capital D)I believe Design requires a holistic grasp of problems, potential, and materials.If you’re only focused on examining problems, you’re not empowered to dream up the proper solutions.If you’re only dreaming up what you could do, you’re not close enough to the ground-level truth.If you’re only working on the nitty gritty implementation, you know about the what but not a lot about the why.A capital-D Designer is comfortable working organically across all of that, without needing to slice it up into separate little steps and responsibilities.This is possible in the real worldThat’s exactly how we work at Basecamp. We skip most of the formal process stuff, and our Designers do everything: writing, visuals, code, project management, whatever it takes.We’re living proof that this approach works well. We support hundreds of thousands of customers, plus multiple platforms and products, with a design team of 10 people.We pull that off specifically because we don’t assign one designer to UX, and another to UI, and another to writing, and another to code.Think this sounds too hard? Like there’s no way you could possibly be good at all of that?Take a step back for a second. We’re only talking about making software.Yes it’s hard…but in the grand scheme of things it’s not THAT hard.If you’re not convinced, take a look at Art. Lebedev Studio:Founded in Moscow in 1995, Art. Lebedev Studio is the only design company in the world offering product design, city and environmental design, graphic design, websites, interfaces, packaging, typeface design, custom patterns and book publishing under one roof.Damn, that’s a lot of stuff! Projects across mediums, genres, industries, you name it. No artificial limits on anything. Inventing things using whatever materials and means necessary.Some of Art Lebedev’s recent workAnd that’s not even a new idea. Now look at master Designer Raymond Loewy, born in 1893:Raymond Loewy (November 5, 1893 —July 14, 1986) was an industrial designer who achieved fame for the magnitude of his design efforts across a variety of industries.Among his designs were the Shell, Exxon, TWA and BP logos, the Greyhound bus, the Coca-Cola bottle, the Lucky Strike package, Coldspot refrigerators, Studebaker cars, and the Air Force One airplane. He was involved with numerous railroad and locomotive designs. His career spanned seven decades.Some of Raymond’s logosA seven decade career making not just logos and products, but planes, trains, and automobiles too! Here’s Raymond, by the way:Raymond Loewy, one hell of a cool Designer.So if Art Lebedev’s shop can do all that, and Raymond Loewy could do what he did, why are we so insufferably particular about boxing ourselves into tiny little specialties just to make websites and apps?Imagine if we stopped doing that, and tossed out our process assumptions and self-defeating arguments about what should be one person’s responsibility versus someone else’s.Maybe we could all gain that magical holistic understanding, and grow to become Computational Designers. Or even just Designers.You can make it happenIf you like this notion, try treating your career like your most important project. Be curious and restless. Aim to be constantly learning and trying new stuff without limits. Find a company or a work environment that lets you take a shot at everything you want to do (they’re out there!)…or invent your own little niche if you can’t find that.This may not be the easiest career path to travel. It’s almost certainly not. But I guarantee you’ll enjoy the ride—especially since you’ve designed it yourself.Hat tip to Jason Fried for turning me on to Raymond Loewy’s work. And a second hat tip to Dustin Senos’ Out of Office Hours project—such a fantastic idea that’s connected me with many wonderful young designers.If you liked this post, hit the ❤️ below or let me know on Twitter.The Unnecessary Fragmentation of Design Jobs was originally published in Signal v. Noise on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Source: 37signals


How to Differentiate Yourself in a Saturated Market, Using Steve Jobs Quotes

Starting a company is tough. Figuring out what to build, how to build it, and how to pay for the whole thing takes tremendous energy and conviction. And the kicker? These days, nearly every idea for a product has already been thought of by someone else. But what if you have an idea that’s better than the others? How can you convince potential backers, customers, and yourself that it’s worth the effort? We asked real-life startup founders how they differentiate themselves in a crowded marketplace, both to investors and the public. As it turns out, their lessons learned, as well as the advice they give to others, map closely to the sage wisdom of the quintessential startup founder, Steve Jobs.
Jobsian Pearl of Wisdom #1“You've got to start with the customer experience and work back toward the technology - not the other way around.”
Understand your user and their challenges. This process becomes even easier if you identify a problem you’ve encountered yourself (you’re a user, too!) and design a solution for it. Hussein Fazal of SnapTravel employed this method when designing a tool to book travel via SMS, Facebook Messenger, and Slack. “We believe that booking travel is an unpleasant experience. While commerce has moved primarily to mobile, most hotel bookings are still made on desktop. The best way to move travel commerce to mobile, is to use messaging - as this is the most natural interface.” He adds that it’s important to “observe user behavior as opposed to trying to assume what people want.”
Matthew Cooper, founder of intelligent loan payment automation platform EarnUp, has similar advice with a philosophical bent: “Go out into the world. Go into the homes and workplaces and quiet places of real people with real challenges. Watch and listen. There we will learn what the actual challenges are we as founders can help solve.”
In a more general sense, your knowledge as a user can extend beyond identifying problems. Alex Bilmes of data visualization platform Reflect notes that a unique point of view is valuable in itself: “I would recommend that founders pull from their personal experiences, since it’s the one thing they have that nobody else does.”
Jobsian Pearl of Wisdom #2“You’ve got to have a problem that you want to solve; a wrong that you want to right.”
In the process of looking for a solution to a problem you (or others) have experienced, you might find yourself stumbling on an unaddressed need in the market. This is an opportunity not just to kill two problems with one stone, but to have a solid foundation for claiming your product’s value to prospective investors or customers.
The ease of identifying a problem, however, doesn’t necessarily indicate that the solution will also be easy. Sometimes getting a truly useful product up and running requires a combination of resource-light and resource-intensive features. Snehal Shinde of personal shopping app Mezi offers some tips for those considering a product with AI: “My advice to founders would be to focus on building a solid core technology that can scale with users, and not go the easy route of adding human experts too quickly, since that won’t scale in long run.”
Another important tip to keep in mind when taking on something as potentially all-consuming as a new business is not biting off more than you can chew. Dmitriy Rokhfeld of industrial equipment e-commerce site Machinio advises that founders should “focus on a single problem and solve that better than anyone else. Too often young companies attempt to disrupt new industries by solving every pain point and every inefficiency from the start.”

Jobsian Pearl of Wisdom #3 “Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quickly, and get on with improving your other innovations.”
Iterating and pivoting are essential parts of the product-building experience. Steve Jobs himself was the master of the pivot, evolving his opinions on what Apple customers wanted and needed over time and having those evolutions reflected in new products.
Alex Strunkin and Derek Richardson of IoT startup Deako explained to me that they actually started their company with a theory of what they wanted to make, then pivoted the company a number of times based on a combination of listening to their users and watching the market. This continual research is imperative, as Alex noted, “you assume someone’s already doing [what you want to do], but when you actually take the time to look at the customer segment, you’ll see who’s really addressing it and who isn’t.”
Madeline Fraser of interior design app Hutch confirmed that being flexible in tweaking your business model is crucial in a fast-moving industry. “When we started our previous design company, we quickly learned the home furnishing space was missing a mobile component to assist our on-the-go generation in a way that's personalized and affordable. Knowing the space was in need of disruption, we pivoted our business model to focus on a mobile platform.” She added, “our advice would be to trust your instincts,” which brings us to our final pearl...
Jobsian Pearl of Wisdom #4“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. As with all matters of the heart, you'll know when you find it.”
Having passion, instinct, and some sort of personal connection to the problem you’re trying to solve is key to creating something that will resonate with others. On this point, Jobs also said without passion for your work, “you won’t have the perseverance to see it through.” This is especially salient when you find yourself toiling away for weeks (or months, or years) on end building a new business and trying to gain a foothold in a crowded market.
Passion isn’t a solely introspective component to entrepreneurship, either. The practical application of your passion as a founder has a ripple effect on all facets of your business. Michael Wayne of lifestyle content startup Kin Community explains: “Focusing on your passion and finding a universal purpose are key to building a strong company foundation. In addition, defining and articulating what values are important to you will help shape and guide your company, your vision, the types of employees you hire and the partners you work with.”
Adam Zbar of food delivery startup Sun Basket expands on this point by advising other founders to consider the larger effect of their work, and “focus on building a business that you are passionate about, believe can have a major impact on the world (in a positive way), and which has a strong, scalable business model.” Seeing a larger impact of your work, even if it’s only theoretical in the beginning, can serve as powerful positive reinforcement during tough times.
Lastly, strength of passion and strength of vision go hand-in-hand when navigating the world of startups. This conviction is contagious, and sends a powerful message when communicating the idea for your business to family and friends, potential investors, and prospective customers. As Brad Heller of Reflect astutely notes, “I think it's important to have a strong vision. If you have a hard time differentiating your vision from someone else's product, then that probably means your vision is indeed not unique!”
Keeping your users and the problems they need solved as a central focus, while maintaining the flexibility to adapt to changes, and always keeping in mind the passion that drove you to come up with the idea in the first place, will go a long way toward setting you up for success in the startup world. That said, it’s also always a good idea to seek out advice one-on-one from experienced entrepreneurs who are interested in sharing their knowledge. Regardless of the niche you might hope to address with a new company, heeding the advice of others who have been in your shoes can serve to make your life a lot easier. Good luck!


Source: VigetInspire


Web Design Trends to Avoid in 2017

Inspired Magazine
Inspired Magazine - creativity & inspiration dailyThe web and the way people interact with it is constantly evolving. That means you must be at the top of your game in 2017. Start by ditching these old trends to usher in a year of fresh web design.Parallax ScrollingParallax is a pretty nifty design technique that gives depth to a website by making the background and foreground elements scroll at different speeds. However, it may not be the best technique in terms of user experience. One of the main drawbacks to parallax scrolling is that it causes web pages to load much slower than their non-parallax counterparts. Of course, this leads to bigger problems. For one, slow websites are bad for SEO. Two, web visitors are generally turned off by them. A one-second delay in page speed results in seven percent fewer conversions, and 79 percent of shoppers who are dissatisfied with website performance are less likely to buy from that site again. Of course, there are numerous factors that play into your website’s speed. The best WordPress hosting services will be quicker than others, and the amount of content and type of content on the page will affect loading times. But if you have the choice between parallax scrolling or not, ditching it will help speed up your site.The question is, is parallax scrolling worth it? In some cases, yes. It helps tell a story and can help convert on its own. In most cases, no. It’s just a fancy effect that leaves web visitors frustrated and with a touch of motion sickness.Hamburger MenusHamburger menus have been around long enough that most people know what they mean and how to use them. But does that mean they have a place on your website? Perhaps not. Hamburger menus were designed to simplify websites and reduce clutter. That’s great for mobile devices, but as these menus moved to desktop sites, people saw higher bounce rates because navigation options weren’t as obvious.The problem with hamburger menus is that they add another step to the process. Users must consciously decide to navigate the site. If they’ve clicked on the hamburger menu, they’re typically already looking for something. And that works…sometimes.Other times, it reduces discoverability, which is particularly detrimental to ecommerce sites where discoverability is what the experience is all about.That said, you don’t have to ditch hamburger menus entirely. You might, for instance, create a hybrid navigation bar that features the most important navigation items prominently with the rest hidden under the hamburger menu. You might also choose to keep the hamburger menu enabled entirely for smartphone users.Your best bet is to test where users are clicking to see if this tactic is working for you. In many cases, however, you’ll be sacrificing user-friendliness and discoverability for aesthetics, and that doesn’t translate into positive conversion rates or ROI.CarouselsCarousels—or slide shows—are a thing of the past. They were once used to highlight multiple pieces of content without cramming the page with too much information at once. Unfortunately, this design element comes with its fair share of drawbacks.For one, carousels can slow your site, which doesn’t fare well with site visitors. You should always be looking to optimize for speed.It’s also difficult to time carousels correctly. Each visitor will read or scroll through your site at a different pace. For some people, the carousel will be too slow. For others, it will be too fast. This makes it inefficient at getting your point across to readers. It’s another case of aesthetics versus user friendliness, and it doesn’t perform well with users. In most cases, carousels are simply a distraction.Not only that, but carousels have been so overused that they give websites a cookie-cutter appeal. They’re not good for SEO, they’re oftentimes inaccessible, and thanks to banner blindness, many users simply ignore them.Try displaying your content in grids instead. This mimics newspaper columns and social media newsfeeds. You can always display featured content in a larger grid module to draw attention to it.One Page DesignThe idea behind a single page design is simple, and it’s a good one. It helps deliver the content people need all in one place without having to navigate around the site. Plus, it puts you in control of the flow of information to guide users through a specific journey.That said, one-page designs rely heavily on above-the-fold information to capture visitors. But what if that’s not enough? Visitors might assume that what they see is all there is. These sites can be difficult to navigate if you have other content for available, such as a blog. Plus, with all the content on one page, it can take the site longer to load. Finally, it’s not exactly good for SEO since you have fewer pages, which means fewer opportunities to target multiple keywords.Cookie-Cutter Web ThemesWeb themes have their advantages. They make it incredibly easy for someone with no design skills to lay out their website in a beautiful, user-friendly fashion. Unfortunately, this leads to many websites that look practically the same. What’s worse, while these themes may be built for user friendliness, they may not suit your brand message. If that’s the case, the user-friendliness matters little because you won’t be converting the people you want to draw to your brand most.Optimize the user experience by making your site one-of-a-kind. Does that mean you have to start from scratch? Not necessarily. Is that a good idea for some businesses? Certainly. You might hire a web design company or freelancer to build your layout from scratch, giving it a completely unique look and layout.But that’s not always needed. If you’re on a budget, cheap web hosting and a highly customizable WordPress theme can get you started for only a few hundred dollars, if that. A good web theme will allow you to build practically anything out of it with unlimited color options, hundreds of fonts to choose from, and multiple template layouts. Plus, you can always hire an agency or designer to make the tweaks to the theme for you to give it an original touch.What you don’t want to do is use free web themes with little customization options. You’ll end up looking like everyone else out there using the same theme. Not only will that keep your site from expressing its individuality, but it can keep you from delivering the messages that could be better said through premium design elements. In many cases, these premium web themes that stray from the cookie-cutter approach will be more user-friendly anyway, helping improve the user experience and boost conversion rates.The important thing to remember is that your website is for your users. You can always “break the rules” of web design as long as it’s a strategic move that will impact user-friendliness for the better. However, don’t assume a design tweak will be for the better; test it! Unfortunately, these abovementioned design trends have been tested time and time again and don’t prove as effective as initially imagined. In 2017, it’s time to ditch these trends in search of new ones that will take user experience and aesthetics to the next level. This post Web Design Trends to Avoid in 2017 was written by John Stevens and first appearedon Inspired Magazine.
Source: inspiredm.com


Depositphotos.com Gives Designers a More Affordable and Flexible Stock Photo Solution

Inspired Magazine
Inspired Magazine - creativity & inspiration dailyWhenever I need an image for a blog post, I immediately start looking at free stock photo sites. There aren’t too many good ones out there, but it’s worth a shot to save a little money.If my efforts fail, I then move onto the paid, royalty-free stock photo sites, where I utilize some of my subscriptions. The only thing is that I’m a writer/hobbyist developer. Therefore, my need for photos is not nearly as thirsty as someone who actually makes money as a designer.Regardless, most paid stock photo sites make it difficult for designers, since you generally end up getting far too many photos for a subscription, or the on-demand plans drain your wallet.Most stock photo companies don’t have that in-between plan with reasonable monthly rates for maybe a few dozen photos per month.Until now.The Depositphotos.com website recently came out with a Flexible Plan, which is far more suitable for mid-sized companies and designers.The company seems to have talked to some of its customers to understand what they are looking for, and I’m certain they discovered a group of users who are unsatisfied with the current price offerings of most stock image sites.Therefore, keep reading to learn a little more about the new Flexible Plan, along with which industries and companies might find it useful.How does the New, Flexible Pricing Help Designers?Here’s the deal: The Flexible Plan from Depositphotos.com goes for $29 per month. With that, you gain access to 30 high-resolution photos, all of which you can immediately download at any size or resolution.In addition, you don’t have to utilize all of your downloads each month. So, if you have a slow month and leave five or ten of the images undownloaded, these roll over to the next month, saving you even more money.Since some folks might go over the 30 image limit, the charge for going over is $1 per photo. This is far better than most on-demand plans in the industry, and you still receive access to the same library of over 50 million royalty-free options.Furthermore, the Depositphotos.com library includes other items like vectors and videos. All of the photos and videos on the site have no expiration date, so you can log into your account and find your past purchases in case you need to download them again.Oh yeah, and if you decide to pay for an entire year upfront, you save $49 overall.How Does This Compare to the Other Plans?Here’s where the true benefits come into view. The on-demand pricing starts at $99 for 25 images. On the other end of the spectrum you can choose a monthly subscription for $69 (giving you 75 images). Those are the lowest priced plans in those categories.It’s easy to see that many designers and brands might not like this setup, considering a regular freelance designer might not ever use more than 30 images per month. On the other hand, you end up paying an insane amount of money per image if you go the on-demand route.That’s why $29 per month for 30 images makes more sense. Heck, when you compare this to the $99 for 25 on-demand images, it’s pretty much a no-brainer.Does the Depositphotos.com Library Have Worthwhile Photos and Videos?As we talked about above, the Depositphotos.com site provides over 50 million images, vectors and videos. This is a solid selection, but what do the images actually look like?After all, I’ve seen some huge libraries, but sometimes the stock images seem outdated-looking or corny.However, that’s not the case with Depositphotos.com. I made a few simple searches for keywords like “office,” “tree,” “camping,” and “party.” The results were relevant, and I would be more than happy to use most of them for blog posts, ecommerce promotional banners, slider images and more.Although I’m not as experienced with vectors and videos, these collections seem intriguing as well.One of the things I noticed was that Depositphotos.com provides lists of popular searches, along with categories and collections. this way, designers can go in there to view pertinent collections, like for holidays and such.Some Standout FeaturesMy favorite part of the Depositphotos.com interface has to be the ability to Favorite certain photos for later use. An account must be created for this, but you can list and categorize your favorite images, just in case you’re preparing for a project into the future.The lightbox preview of each image lets you share the item with friends. Not to mention, it displays a wonderful view of the image for seeing if you actually want to buy it.It’s also nice that you receive an incredible amount of picture information from each option. For example, you can look at related photos for each one, while also searching for similar photos with the same models in them. The resolutions, sizes and formats are mentioned in the lightbox as well, along with a large Download button for when you’re ready to buy.Finally, you do have the ability to create folders and share them with people in your organization. For example, a design company might have a group of people working on an email marketing campaign. If that’s the case, they’ll need to select certain photos to break up the text.Instead of opening a Google Drive file, you can keep all of the photos on the Depositphotos website for quick and easy viewing. That’s all there is to it.Who Should Consider Signing Up For The Depositphotos.com Flexible Plan?I really like the Depositphotos.com Flexible plan for medium-sized companies and designers. Some bloggers might find it reasonable for their budgets as well.The only reason I would go with a monthly plan is if my photo usage was far higher than 30 images per month. The on-demand plan doesn’t make any sense to me unless you’re only grabbing less than a handful of items per month.Feel free to try out the new plan here, and let us know in the comments section if you have any thoughts about Depositphotos.com in general.This post Depositphotos.com Gives Designers a More Affordable and Flexible Stock Photo Solution was written by Inspired Mag Team and first appearedon Inspired Magazine.
Source: inspiredm.com


Advice for Starting a Business That Lasts

Until earlier this month, I had forgotten about receiving this email more than seven years ago:

From: KemariSent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 5:10 PMSubject: AdviceI'm Kemari. I'm in high school and i'm looking to start a web design business focused on beautiful, standards-driven websites. I wanted to ask if you had any advice on how I could do that, or any resources that helped you get started. I recently saw your site on a gallery and it's amazing. I love the work you're doing. Thank you so much. =)

At that point, Viget was nine years old with a staff of 38 people -- reasonably successful.  I wasn’t in high school when we started, but I was in college when I started doing the freelance work that laid the foundation for Viget.  In the mid-90s, it was difficult to find and contact people for advice, and that made many things more challenging.  So, Kemari’s email resonated with me.

By the time we incorporated Viget Labs, LLC in 1999, I was 2 years out of college and just 24 years old.  We struggled through our first few years in large part because of my lack of experience.

Early days of Viget in Cindy’s basement trying to figure it out.

As much as I could, I tried to glean insights from others -- friends, clients, and peers with more wisdom and know-how than me.  While I occasionally received great advice, and I’ll always appreciate the mentorship others provided, looking back, I mostly learned by doing.  Trial and error, then studying the error and avoiding it the next time.  Practice and progress.
This was my quick response to Kemari seven years ago:
On Sun, Feb 1, 2009 at 5:49 PM, Brian Williams wrote:Hi Kemari.Thanks for your email.  My advice is pretty simple: do whatever you can to do work.  The key to starting out is having people who will vouch for you as being dependable for producing high-quality work on time and within whatever budget is agreed upon.  You won't get those references unless you start doing work, and there's no way to fake them -- that's why they're so valuable.So, I would look for projects you can do for people at no cost to start, just to show what you can do.  Use those to build up a portfolio of work on your own web site.  They'll also provide practice so you can get better over time.  You can learn everything about web design on the web (using blogs like viget/inspire) -- but growing as a designer takes talent and practice.Then keep an eye out for project opportunities on sites like Craig's List, and just pitch your services.  Use LinkedIn to grow a network of contacts and don't be afraid to ask happy clients to recommend you on there.As you do more work, raise your rates, go after higher-end clients, and build up a reputation.  Don't hire people until you absolutely have to.  Don't get office space or buy any assets other than the minimum that you need to do your work (i.e., a computer) until you really have to.  Go to college and have a backup plan.Whatever you do, just do great work and work harder than everyone else -- that's it!Good luck!Brian

I wrote this in the context of starting out, but I remember 2009 -- it was a bad time for our business, one of several down cycles we had to endure.  The global financial crisis was catching up with us, and I’m sure I was questioning whether we’d survive the year, much less be worthy of providing advice to the next generation of entrepreneurs.  
In some ways, my response was a reminder to myself of how we’d survived as long as we had, and what was needed to continue on.  Do work.  Earn and cherish happy clients.  Get better every time.  Be frugal.  Be strategic.  Execute.  Hustle.  Give back.
These ideals were as relevant nine years into our business as they were when we started, and they still ring true today, more than sixteen years since we began.  We don’t have this advice plastered on a wall or listed in a handbook for how to run a company -- it’s just baked into our culture.
Earlier this month, Kemari reconnected.
On Sat, Oct 8, 2016 at 1:34 PM, Kemari wrote:Hi Brian,Not sure if this is still your email, but I thought you might appreciate an update several years later......I emailed you over seven years ago asking for advice about starting a web design business. Not long after I got your email, I did in fact my own web design company. After high school, I ended up going to Stanford University which is where I'm finishing from now. I realized there that I enjoyed web design because I was able to use my creativity to help clients realize their vision. It wasn't as enjoyable when I was being graded through a curriculum that didn't align with how I understood web design, when things such as web standards, etc were absent. I eventually realized it's not really for me anymore, and I'm now interested in medicine. Even though it's a much different field, the problem solving skills I learned designing websites at a young age will stick with me forever. Regardless, I want to thank you so much for taking the time back then to share your experience with me (a random stranger from the internet). It's the one thing I love and appreciate about the web design community.....great people like you always eager to help, and collaborate. Thank you again. and I hope your business is still going strong. You're a pioneer in our new digital frontier, and I'm grateful for your help in helping me stake out my own trail.Best,Kemari
Hearing back from him after all these years meant a lot, and his perspective is inspiring.  Work ethic, creative problem solving, valuing human connections -- these are important in every industry, every career, every project you’ll ever be on.  They helped us build Viget into a strong business that will last for many more decades, and it’s great to see Kemari reflect on how they can apply in an entirely different career direction as well.
Thank you, Kemari, for being a part of this journey with me.


Source: VigetInspire


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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.


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Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development. We allow our clients to do what they are good at—while we will handle the technical mumbo-jumbo. We partner seamlessly with advertising agencies, marketing agencies, and creative shops to offer professional class website integrationtechnical know–how as well as strategy expertise. Pixeldust also partners with Colleges and Universities as an extension of their integrationteams. We are the resource any project whenever you need us. In business since 1999, Pixeldust has completed over 300 projects with several Fortune 500 businesses, giving us plenty of experience in designing beautiful, custom-tailored websites while keeping your business interests in mind. Pixeldust is an expert web integrationagency specializing in responsive website development. Using the latest technologies, coupled with a healthy dose of expertise, we work closely with agencies on specifications, estimates, documentation, project management, and the integrationof integrated solutions. We can work with our agency clients to define all technical aspects of a project and create documentation that they can plug right into a Statement of Work. Pixeldust focuses on quality, not quantity; we aim to provide a responsive and personal approach to each project to ensure clients benefit from their investment. We see each web integrationproject as an opportunity to please your client, grow sales, and improve retention while offering functional applications that suit your designs faultlessly.