State Farm Insurance and Steve Harvey

Pixeldust worked with Sanders/Wingo to concept and build three interactive pieces for them to present to State Farm.  Pixeldust created the concepts and wrote the scripts for the three pieces, including an animated Flash movie, a Flash-based screen saver and a cartoon. All featured comedian Steve Harvey.  Pixeldust developed the creative and Flash production for the pieces.

With offices in El Paso and Austin, Sanders/Wingo provides multicultural advertising and public relations services using emerging technologies and marketing platforms.

State Farm Insurance offers coverage for auto, life, home, health, and more all over the United States


Gatti's Jingle Campaign Microsite Launches

Pixeldust and Nice Monster launched a microsite for Gatti's web-based jingle contest. Gatti's, a rapidly-expanding, long-time Texas pizza chain, is looking to update their current jingle with a public music contest. Pixeldust and Nice Monster built the web application for users and musicians to upload their music and videos for the contest. Submissions will be judged by regular users and a panel of Gatti's judges. The winning jingle will receive a cash prize of $10,000 and media exposure, and be featured in Gatti's end-of-contest concert. Read more


Gatti’s Pizza

Pixeldust put a lot of digital mojo into gattisjingle.com. Utilizing a musician's flyer feel, we designed and developed a clean microsite that would ultimately serve as a bridge for the 40th anniversary, remind Austinites that Gatti's started in Austin, and generate excitement and interest among new and existing customers. And they wanted to conquer social media.Read more


Webs of Power

Pixeldust worked with Greenleaf Book Group to design and develop a Flash site that correlated with the launch of Webs of Power. We also installed a content management system for regular content updates.Read more


Maggiano's Italian Harvest Rich Media Campaign Launches

Pixeldust has launched Maggiano's Italian Harvest rich media video banner campaign. Maggiano's is an Italian Restaurant chain owned by Brinker International Restaurants. The campaign is published by Eyeblaster, an online banner ad publisher, and will run through the end of the year. Read more


Who sponsors Drupal development? (2018-2019 edition)

The past years, I've examined Drupal.org's contribution data to understand who develops Drupal, how diverse the Drupal community is, how much of Drupal's maintenance and innovation is sponsored, and where that sponsorship comes from.

You can look at the 2016 report, the 2017 report, and the 2018 report. Each report looks at data collected in the 12-month period between July 1st and June 30th.

This year's report shows that:

Both the recorded number of contributors and contributions have increased.
Most contributions are sponsored, but volunteer contributions remains very important to Drupal's success.
Drupal's maintenance and innovation depends mostly on smaller Drupal agencies and Acquia. Hosting companies, multi-platform digital marketing agencies, large system integrators and end users make fewer contributions to Drupal.
Drupal's contributors have become more diverse, but are still not diverse enough.
Methodology

What are Drupal.org issues?

"Issues" are pages on Drupal.org. Each issue tracks an idea, feature request, bug report, task, or more. See https://www.drupal.org/project/issues for the list of all issues.

For this report, we looked at all Drupal.org issues marked "closed" or "fixed" in the 12-month period from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019. The issues analyzed in this report span Drupal core and thousands of contributed projects, across all major versions of Drupal.

What are Drupal.org credits?

In the spring of 2015, after proposing initial ideas for giving credit, Drupal.org added the ability for people to attribute their work in the Drupal.org issues to an organization or customer, or mark it the result of volunteer efforts.

A screenshot of an issue comment on Drupal.org. You can see that jamadar worked on this patch as a volunteer, but also as part of his day job working for TATA Consultancy Services on behalf of their customer, Pfizer.
Drupal.org's credit system is truly unique and groundbreaking in Open Source and provides unprecedented insights into the inner workings of a large Open Source project. There are a few limitations with this approach, which we'll address at the end of this report.

What is the Drupal community working on?

In the 12-month period between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019, 27,522 issues were marked "closed" or "fixed", a 13% increase from the 24,447 issues in the 2017-2018 period.

In total, the Drupal community worked on 3,474 different Drupal.org projects this year compared to 3,229 projects in the 2017-2018 period — an 8% year over year increase.

The majority of the credits are the result of work on contributed modules:

Compared to the previous period, contribution credits increased across all project types:

The most notable change is the large jump in "non-product credits": more and more members in the community started tracking credits for non-product activities such as organizing Drupal events (e.g. DrupalCamp Delhi project, Drupal Developer Days, Drupal Europe and DrupalCon Europe), promoting Drupal (e.g. Drupal pitch deck or community working groups (e.g. Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Working Group, Governance Working Group).

While some of these increases reflect new contributions, others are existing contributions that are newly reported. All contributions are valuable, whether they're code contributions, or non-product and community-oriented contributions such as organizing events, giving talks, leading sprints, etc. The fact that the credit system is becoming more accurate in recognizing more types of Open Source contribution is both important and positive.

Who is working on Drupal?

For this report's time period, Drupal.org's credit system received contributions from 8,513 different individuals and 1,137 different organizations — a meaningful increase from last year's report.

Consistent with previous years, approximately 51% of the individual contributors received just one credit. Meanwhile, the top 30 contributors (the top 0.4%) account for 19% of the total credits. In other words, a relatively small number of individuals do the majority of the work. These individuals put an incredible amount of time and effort into developing Drupal and its contributed projects:

RankUsernameIssues1kiamlaluno16102jrockowitz7563alexpott6424RajabNatshah6165volkswagenchick5196bojanz5047alonaoneill4898thalles4889Wim Leers43710DamienMcKenna43111Berdir42412chipway35613larowlan32414pifagor32015catch31316mglaman27717adci_contributor27418quietone26619tim.plunkett26520gaurav.kapoor25321RenatoG24622heddn24323chr.fritsch24124xjm23825phenaproxima23826mkalkbrenner23527gvso23228dawehner21929e0ipso21830drumm205Out of the top 30 contributors featured this year, 28 were active contributors in the 2017-2018 period as well. These Drupalists' dedication and continued contribution to the project has been crucial to Drupal's development.

It's also important to recognize that most of the top 30 contributors are sponsored by an organization. Their sponsorship details are provided later in this article. We value the organizations that sponsor these remarkable individuals, because without their support, it could be more challenging for these individuals to be in the top 30.

It's also nice to see two new contributors make the top 30 this year — Alona O'neill with sponsorship from Hook 42 and Thalles Ferreira with sponsorship from CI&T. Most of their credits were the result of smaller patches (e.g. removing deprecated code, fixing coding style issues, etc) or in some cases non-product credits rather than new feature development or fixing complex bugs. These types of contributions are valuable and often a stepping stone towards towards more in-depth contribution.
How much of the work is sponsored?

Issue credits can be marked as "volunteer" and "sponsored" simultaneously (shown in jamadar's screenshot near the top of this post). This could be the case when a contributor does the necessary work to satisfy the customer's need, in addition to using their spare time to add extra functionality.

For those credits with attribution details, 18% were "purely volunteer" credits (8,433 credits), in stark contrast to the 65% that were "purely sponsored" (29,802 credits). While there are almost four times as many "purely sponsored" credits as "purely volunteer" credits, volunteer contribution remains very important to Drupal.

Both "purely volunteer" and "purely sponsored" credits grew — "purely sponsored" credits grew faster in absolute numbers, but for the first time in four years "purely volunteer" credits grew faster in relative numbers.

The large jump in volunteer credits can be explained by the community capturing more non-product contributions. As can be seen on the graph below, these non-product contributions are more volunteer-centric.

Who is sponsoring the work?

Now that we've established that the majority of contributions to Drupal are sponsored, let's study which organizations contribute to Drupal. While 1,137 different organizations contributed to Drupal, approximately 50% of them received four credits or less. The top 30 organizations (roughly the top 3%) account for approximately 25% of the total credits, which implies that the top 30 companies play a crucial role in the health of the Drupal project.

Top contributing organizations based on the number of issue credits.While not immediately obvious from the graph above, a variety of different types of companies are active in Drupal's ecosystem:

Category
Description
Traditional Drupal businesses
Small-to-medium-sized professional services companies that primarily make money using Drupal. They typically employ fewer than 100 employees, and because they specialize in Drupal, many of these professional services companies contribute frequently and are a huge part of our community. Examples are Hook42, Centarro, The Big Blue House, Vardot, etc.
Digital marketing agencies
Larger full-service agencies that have marketing-led practices using a variety of tools, typically including Drupal, Adobe Experience Manager, Sitecore, WordPress, etc. They tend to be larger, with many of the larger agencies employing thousands of people. Examples are Wunderman, Possible and Mirum.
System integrators
Larger companies that specialize in bringing together different technologies into one solution. Example system agencies are Accenture, TATA Consultancy Services, Capgemini and CI&T.
Hosting companies
Examples are Acquia, Rackspace, Pantheon and Platform.sh.
End users
Examples are Pfizer or bio.logis Genetic Information Management GmbH.
A few observations:

Almost all of the sponsors in the top 30 are traditional Drupal businesses with fewer than 50 employees. Only five companies in the top 30 — Pfizer, Google, CI&T, bio.logis and Acquia — are not traditional Drupal businesses. The traditional Drupal businesses are responsible for almost 80% of all the credits in the top 30. This percentage goes up if you extend beyond the top 30. It's fair to say that Drupal's maintenance and innovation largely depends on these traditional Drupal businesses.
The larger, multi-platform digital marketing agencies are barely contributing to Drupal. While more and more large digital agencies are building out Drupal practices, no digital marketing agencies show up in the top 30, and hardly any appear in the entire list of contributing organizations. While they are not required to contribute, I'm frustrated that we have not yet found the right way to communicate the value of contribution to these companies. We need to incentivize each of these firms to contribute back with the same commitment that we see from traditional Drupal businesses
The only system integrator in the top 30 is CI&T, which ranked 4th with 795 credits. As far as system integrators are concerned, CI&T is a smaller player with approximately 2,500 employees. However, we do see various system integrators outside of the top 30, including Globant, Capgemini, Sapient and TATA Consultancy Services. In the past year, Capgemini almost quadrupled their credits from 46 to 196, TATA doubled its credits from 85 to 194, Sapient doubled its credits from 28 to 65, and Globant kept more or less steady with 41 credits. Accenture and Wipro do not appear to contribute despite doing a fair amount of Drupal work in the field.
Hosting companies also play an important role in our community, yet only Acquia appears in the top 30. Rackspace has 68 credits, Pantheon has 43, and Platform.sh has 23. I looked for other hosting companies in the data, but couldn't find any. In general, there is a persistent problem with hosting companies that make a lot of money with Drupal not contributing back. The contribution gap between Acquia and other hosting companies has increased, not decreased.
We also saw three end users in the top 30 as corporate sponsors: Pfizer (453 credits), Thunder (659 credits, up from 432 credits the year before), and the German company, bio.logis (330 credits). A notable end user is Johnson & Johnson, who was just outside of the top 30, with 221 credits, up from 29 credits the year before. Other end users outside of the top 30, include the European Commission (189 credits), Workday (112 credits), Paypal (80 credits), NBCUniversal (48 credits), Wolters Kluwer (20 credits), and Burda Media (24 credits). We also saw contributions from many universities, including the University of British Columbia (148 credits), University of Waterloo (129 credits), Princeton University (73 credits), University of Austin Texas at Austin (57 credits), Charles Darwin University (24 credits), University of Edinburgh (23 credits), University of Minnesota (19 credits) and many more.

It would be interesting to see what would happen if more end users mandated contributions from their partners. Pfizer, for example, only works with agencies that contribute back to Drupal, and uses Drupal's credit system to verify their vendors' claims. The State of Georgia started doing the same; they also made Open Source contribution a vendor selection criteria. If more end users took this stance, it could have a big impact on the number of digital agencies, hosting companies and system integrators that contribute to Drupal.

While we should encourage more organizations to sponsor Drupal contributions, we should also understand and respect that some organizations can give more than others and that some might not be able to give back at all. Our goal is not to foster an environment that demands what and how others should give back. Instead, we need to help foster an environment worthy of contribution. This is clearly laid out in Drupal's Values and Principles.

How diverse is Drupal?

Supporting diversity and inclusion within Drupal is essential to the health and success of the project. The people who work on Drupal should reflect the diversity of people who use and work with the web.

I looked at both the gender and geographic diversity of Drupal.org contributors. While these are only two examples of diversity, these are the only diversity characteristics we currently have sufficient data for. Drupal.org recently rolled out support for Big 8/Big 10, so next year we should have more demographics information

Gender diversity

The data shows that only 8% of the recorded contributions were made by contributors who do not identify as male, which continues to indicate a wide gender gap. This is a one percent increase compared to last year. The gender imbalance in Drupal is profound and underscores the need to continue fostering diversity and inclusion in our community.

Last year I wrote a post called about the privilege of free time in Open Source. It made the case that Open Source is not a meritocracy, because not everyone has equal amounts of free time to contribute. For example, research shows that women still spend more than double the time as men doing unpaid domestic work, such as housework or childcare. This makes it more difficult for women to contribute to Open Source on an unpaid, volunteer basis. It's one of the reasons why Open Source projects suffer from a lack of diversity, among others including hostile environments and unconscious biases. Drupal.org's credit data unfortunately still shows a big gender disparity in contributions:

Ideally, over time, we can collect more data on non-binary gender designations, as well as segment some of the trends behind contributions by gender. We can also do better at collecting data on other systemic issues beyond gender alone. Knowing more about these trends can help us close existing gaps. In the meantime, organizations capable of giving back should consider financially sponsoring individuals from underrepresented groups to contribute to Open Source. Each of us needs to decide if and how we can help give time and opportunities to underrepresented groups and how we can create equity for everyone in Drupal.
Geographic diversity

When measuring geographic diversity, we saw individual contributors from six continents and 114 countries:

Contribution credits per capita calculated as the amount of contributions per continent divided by the population of each continent. 0.001% means that one in 100,000 people contribute to Drupal. In North America, 5 in 100,000 people contributed to Drupal the last year.Contributions from Europe and North America are both on the rise. In absolute terms, Europe contributes more than North America, but North America contributes more per capita.

Asia, South America and Africa remain big opportunities for Drupal, as their combined population accounts for 6.3 billion out of 7.5 billion people in the world. Unfortunately, the reported contributions from Asia are declining year over year. For example, compared to last year's report, there was a 17% drop in contribution from India. Despite that drop, India remains the second largest contributor behind the United States:

The top 20 countries from which contributions originate. The data is compiled by aggregating the countries of all individual contributors behind each issue. Note that the geographical location of contributors doesn't always correspond with the origin of their sponsorship. Wim Leers, for example, works from Belgium, but his funding comes from Acquia, which has the majority of its customers in North America.Top contributor details

To create more awareness of which organizations are sponsoring the top individual contributors, I included a more detailed overview of the top 50 contributors and their sponsors. If you are a Drupal developer looking for work, these are some of the companies I'd apply to first. If you are an end user looking for a company to work with, these are some of the companies I'd consider working with first. Not only do they know Drupal well, they also help improve your investment in Drupal.

Rank
Username
Issues
Volunteer
Sponsored
Not specified
Sponsors
1
kiamlaluno
1610
99%
0%
1%

2
jrockowitz
756
98%
99%
0%
The Big Blue House (750), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (5), Rosewood Marketing (1)
3
alexpott
642
6%
80%
19%
Thunder (336), Acro Media Inc (100), Chapter Three (77)
4
RajabNatshah
616
1%
100%
0%
Vardot (730), Webship (2)
5
volkswagenchick
519
2%
99%
0%
Hook 42 (341), Kanopi Studios (171)
6
bojanz
504
0%
98%
2%
Centarro (492), Ny Media AS (28), Torchbox (5), Liip (2), Adapt (2)
7
alonaoneill
489
9%
99%
0%
Hook 42 (484)
8
thalles
488
0%
100%
0%
CI&T (488), Janrain (3), Johnson & Johnson (2)
9
Wim Leers
437
8%
97%
0%
Acquia (421), Government of Flanders (3)
10
DamienMcKenna
431
0%
97%
3%
Mediacurrent (420)
11
Berdir
424
0%
92%
8%
MD Systems (390)
12
chipway
356
0%
100%
0%
Chipway (356)
13
larowlan
324
16%
94%
2%
PreviousNext (304), Charles Darwin University (22), University of Technology, Sydney (3), Service NSW (2), Department of Justice & Regulation, Victoria (1)
14
pifagor
320
52%
100%
0%
GOLEMS GABB (618), EPAM Systems (16), Drupal Ukraine Community (6)
15
catch
313
1%
95%
4%
Third & Grove (286), Tag1 Consulting (11), Drupal Association (6), Acquia (4)
16
mglaman
277
2%
98%
1%
Centarro (271), Oomph, Inc. (16), E.C. Barton & Co (3), Gaggle.net, Inc. (1), Bluespark (1), Thinkbean (1), LivePerson, Inc (1), Impactiv, Inc. (1), Rosewood Marketing (1), Acro Media Inc (1)
17
adci_contributor
274
0%
100%
0%
ADCI Solutions (273)
18
quietone
266
41%
75%
1%
Acro Media Inc (200)
19
tim.plunkett
265
3%
89%
9%
Acquia (235)
20
gaurav.kapoor
253
0%
51%
49%
OpenSense Labs (129), DrupalFit (111)
21
RenatoG
246
0%
100%
0%
CI&T (246), Johnson & Johnson (85)
22
heddn
243
2%
98%
2%
MTech, LLC (202), Tag1 Consulting (32), European Commission (22), North Studio (3), Acro Media Inc (2)
23
chr.fritsch
241
0%
99%
1%
Thunder (239)
24
xjm
238
0%
85%
15%
Acquia (202)
25
phenaproxima
238
0%
100%
0%
Acquia (238)
26
mkalkbrenner
235
0%
100%
0%
bio.logis Genetic Information Management GmbH (234), OSCE: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (41), Welsh Government (4)
27
gvso
232
0%
100%
0%
Google Summer of Code (214), Google Code-In (16), Zivtech (1)
28
dawehner
219
39%
84%
8%
Chapter Three (176), Drupal Association (5), Tag1 Consulting (3), TES Global (1)
29
e0ipso
218
99%
100%
0%
Lullabot (217), IBM (23)
30
drumm
205
0%
98%
1%
Drupal Association (201)
31
gabesullice
199
0%
100%
0%
Acquia (198), Aten Design Group (1)
32
amateescu
194
0%
97%
3%
Pfizer, Inc. (186), Drupal Association (1), Chapter Three (1)
33
klausi
193
2%
59%
40%
jobiqo - job board technology (113)
34
samuel.mortenson
187
42%
42%
17%
Acquia (79)
35
joelpittet
187
28%
78%
14%
The University of British Columbia (146)
36
borisson_
185
83%
50%
3%
Calibrate (79), Dazzle (13), Intracto digital agency (1)
37
Gábor Hojtsy
184
0%
97%
3%
Acquia (178)
38
adriancid
182
91%
22%
2%
Drupiter (40)
39
eiriksm
182
0%
100%
0%
Violinist (178), Ny Media AS (4)
40
yas
179
12%
80%
10%
DOCOMO Innovations, Inc. (143)
41
TR
177
0%
0%
100%

42
hass
173
1%
0%
99%

43
Joachim Namyslo
172
69%
0%
31%

44
alex_optim
171
0%
99%
1%
GOLEMS GABB (338)
45
flocondetoile
168
0%
99%
1%
Flocon de toile (167)
46
Lendude
168
52%
99%
0%
Dx Experts (91), ezCompany (67), Noctilaris (9)
47
paulvandenburg
167
11%
72%
21%
ezCompany (120)
48
voleger
165
98%
98%
2%
GOLEMS GABB (286), Lemberg Solutions Limited (36), Drupal Ukraine Community (1)
49
lauriii
164
3%
98%
1%
Acquia (153), Druid (8), Lääkärikeskus Aava Oy (2)
50
idebr
162
0%
99%
1%
ezCompany (156), One Shoe (5)
Limitations of the credit system

It is important to note a few of the current limitations of Drupal.org's credit system:

The credit system doesn't capture all code contributions. Parts of Drupal are developed on GitHub rather than Drupal.org, and often aren't fully credited on Drupal.org. For example, Drush is maintained on GitHub instead of Drupal.org, and companies like Pantheon don't get credit for that work. The Drupal Association is working to integrate GitLab with Drupal.org. GitLab will provide support for "merge requests", which means contributing to Drupal will feel more familiar to the broader audience of Open Source contributors who learned their skills in the post-patch era. Some of GitLab's tools, such as in-line editing and web-based code review will also lower the barrier to contribution, and should help us grow both the number of contributions and contributors on Drupal.org.
The credit system is not used by everyone. There are many ways to contribute to Drupal that are still not captured in the credit system, including things like event organizing or providing support. Technically, that work could be captured as demonstrated by the various non-product initiatives highlighted in this post. Because using the credit system is optional, many contributors don't. As a result, contributions often have incomplete or no contribution credits. We need to encourage all Drupal contributors to use the credit system, and raise awareness of its benefits to both individuals and organizations. Where possible, we should automatically capture credits. For example, translation efforts on https://localize.drupal.org are not currently captured in the credit system but could be automatically.
The credit system disincentives work on complex issues. We currently don't have a way to account for the complexity and quality of contributions; one person might have worked several weeks for just one credit, while another person might receive a credit for 10 minutes of work. We certainly see a few individuals and organizations trying to game the credit system. In the future, we should consider issuing credit data in conjunction with issue priority, patch size, number of reviews, etc. This could help incentivize people to work on larger and more important problems and save smaller issues such as coding standards improvements for new contributor sprints. Implementing a scoring system that ranks the complexity of an issue would also allow us to develop more accurate reports of contributed work.
All of this means that the actual number of contributions and contributors could be significantly higher than what we report.

Like Drupal itself, the Drupal.org credit system needs to continue to evolve. Ultimately, the credit system will only be useful when the community uses it, understands its shortcomings, and suggests constructive improvements.

A first experiment with weighing credits

As a simple experiment, I decided to weigh each credit based on the adoption of the project the credit is attributed to. For example, each contribution credit to Drupal core is given a weight of 11 because Drupal core has about 1,1 million active installations. Credits to the Webform module, which has over 400,000 installations, get a weight of 4. And credits to Drupal's Commerce project gets just 1 point as it is installed on fewer than 100,000 sites.

The idea is that these weights capture the end user impact of each contribution, but also act as a proxy for the effort required to get a change committed. Getting a change accepted in Drupal core is both more difficult and more impactful than getting a change accepted to Commerce project.

This weighting is far from perfect as it undervalues non-product contributions, and it still doesn't recognize all types of product contributions (e.g. product strategy work, product management work, release management work, etc). That said, for code contributions, it may be more accurate than a purely unweighted approach.

The top 30 contributing individuals based on weighted Drupal.org issue credits.The top 30 contributing organizations based on weighted Drupal.org issue credits.

Conclusions

Our data confirms that Drupal is a vibrant community full of contributors who are constantly evolving and improving the software. It's amazing to see that just in the last year, Drupal welcomed more than 8,000 individuals contributors and over 1,100 corporate contributors. It's especially nice to see the number of reported contributions, individual contributors and organizational contributors increase year over year.

To grow and sustain Drupal, we should support those that contribute to Drupal and find ways to get those that are not contributing involved in our community. Improving diversity within Drupal is critical, and we should welcome any suggestions that encourage participation from a broader range of individuals and organizations.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Acquia retrospective 2018

Every year, I sit down to write my annual Acquia retrospective. It's a rewarding exercise, because it allows me to reflect on how much progress Acquia has made in the past 12 months.

Overall, Acquia had an excellent 2018. I believe we are a much stronger company than we were a year ago; not only because of our financial results, but because of our commitment to strengthen our product and engineering teams.

If you'd like to read my previous retrospectives, they can be found here: 2017,2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009. This year marks the publishing of my tenth retrospective. When read together, these posts provide a comprehensive overview of Acquia's growth and trajectory.

Updating our brand

Exiting 2017, Acquia doubled down on our transition from website management to digital experience management. In 2018, we updated our product positioning and brand narrative to reflect this change. This included a new Acquia Experience Platform diagram:

The Acquia Platform is divided into two key parts: the Experience Factory and the Marketing Hub. Drupal and Acquia Lightning power every side of the experience. The Acquia Platform supports our customers throughout the entire life cycle of a digital experience — from building to operating and optimizing digital experiences.

In 2018, the Acquia marketing team also worked hard to update Acquia's brand. The result is a refreshed look and updated brand positioning that better reflects our vision, culture, and the value we offer our customers. This included updating our tagline to read: Experience Digital Freedom.

I think Acquia's updated brand looks great, and it's been exciting to see it come to life. From highway billboards to Acquia Engage in Austin, our updated brand has been very well received.

When Acquia Engage attendees arrived at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport for Acquia Engage 2018, they were greeted by an Acquia display.Business momentum

This year, Acquia surpassed $200 million in annualized revenue. Overall new subscription bookings grew 33 percent year over year, and we ended the year with nearly 900 employees.

Mike Sullivan completed his first year as Acquia's CEO, and demonstrated a strong focus on improving Acquia's business fundamentals across operational efficiency, gross margins, and cost optimization. The results have been tangible, as Acquia has realized unprecedented financial growth in 2018:

Channel-partner bookings grew 52 percent
EMEA-based bookings grew 103 percent
Gross profit grew 39 percent
Adjusted EBITDA grew 78 percent
Free cash flow grew 84 percent
2018 was a record year for Acquia. Year-over-year highlights include new subscription bookings, EMEA-based bookings, free cash flow, and more.International growth and expansion

In 2018, Acquia also witnessed unprecedented success in Europe and Asia, as new bookings in EMEA were up more than 100 percent. This included expanding our European headquarters to a new and larger space with a ribbon-cutting ceremony with the mayor of Reading in the U.K.

Acquia also expanded its presence in Asia Pacific, and opened Tokyo-based operations in 2018. Over the past few years I visited Japan twice, and I'm excited for the opportunities that doing business in Japan offers.

We selected Pune as the location for our new India office, and we are in the process of hiring our first Pune-based engineers.

Acquia now has four offices in the Asia Pacific region serving customers like Astellas Pharmaceuticals, Muji, Mediacorp, and Brisbane City Council.

Acquia product information, translated into Japanese.Acquia Engage

In 2018, we welcomed more than 650 attendees to Austin, Texas, for our annual customer conference, Acquia Engage. In June, we also held our first Acquia Engage Europe and welcomed 300 attendees.

Our Engage conferences included presentations from customers like Paychex, NBC Sports, Wendy's, West Corporation, General Electric, Charles Schwab, Pac-12 Networks, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Bayer, Virgin Sport, and more. We also featured keynote presentations from our partner network, including VMLY&R, Accenture Interactive, IBM iX and MRM//McCann.

Both customers and partners continue to be the most important driver of Acquia's product strategy, and it's always rewarding to hear about this success first hand. In fact, 2018 customer satisfaction levels remain extremely high at 94 percent.

Partner program

Finally, Acquia's partner network continues to become more sophisticated. In the second half of 2018, we right sized our partner community from 2,270 firms to 226. This was a bold move, but our goal was to place a renewed focus on the partners who were both committed to Acquia and highly capable. As a result, we saw almost 52 percent year-over-year growth in partner-sourced ACV bookings. This is meaningful because for every $1 Acquia books in collaboration with a partner, our partner makes about $5 in services revenue.

Analyst recognition

In 2018, the top industry analysts published very positive reviews about Acquia. I'm proud that Acquia was recognized by Forrester Research as the leader for strategy and vision in The Forrester Wave: Web Content Management Systems, Q4 2018. Acquia was also named a leader in the 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management, marking our placement as a leader for the fifth year in a row.

Product milestones

Acquia's product evolution between 2008 and 2018. When Acquia was founded, our mission was to provide commercial support for Drupal and to be the "Red Hat for Drupal"; 12 years later, the Acquia Platform helps organizations build, operate and optimize Drupal-based experiences.

2018 was one of the busiest years I have experienced; it was full of non-stop action every day. My biggest focus was working with Acquia's product and engineering team.
We focused on growing and improving our R&D organization, modernizing Acquia Cloud, becoming user-experience first, redesigning the Acquia Lift user experience, working on headless Drupal, making Drupal easier to use, and expanding our commerce strategy.

Hiring, hiring, hiring

In partnership with Mike, we decided to increase the capacity of our research and development team by 60 percent. At the close of 2018, we were able to increase the capacity of our research and development team by 45 percent percent. We will continue to invest in growing our our R&D team in 2019.

I spent a lot of our time restructuring, improving and scaling the product organization to make sure we could handle the increased capacity and build out a world-class R&D organization.

As the year progressed, R&D capacity increasingly came online and our ability to innovate not only improved but accelerated significantly. We entered 2019 in a much better position, as we now have a lot more capacity to innovate.

Acquia Cloud

Acquia Cloud and Acquia Cloud Site Factory support some of the largest and most mission-critical websites in the world. The scope and complexity that Acquia Cloud and Acquia Cloud Site Factory manages is enormous. We easily deliver more than 30 billion page views a month (excluding CDN).

Over the course of 10 years, the Acquia Cloud codebase had grown very large. Updating, testing and launching new releases took a long time because we had one large, monolithic codebase. This was something we needed to change in order to add new features faster.

Over the course of 2018, the engineering team broke the monolithic codebase down into discrete components that can be tested and released independently. We launched our component-based architecture in June. Since then, the engineering team has released changes to production 650 times, compared to our historic pace of doing one release per quarter.

This graph shows how we moved Acquia Cloud from a monolithic code base to a component-based code base. Each color on the graph represents a component. The graph shows how releases of Acquia Cloud (and the individual components in particular) have accelerated in the second half of the year.Planning and designing for all of these services took a lot of time and focus, and was a large priority for the entire engineering team (including me). The fruits of these efforts will start to become more publicly visible in 2019. I'm excited to share more with you in future blog posts.

Acquia Cloud also remains the most secure and compliant cloud for Drupal. As we were componentizing the Acquia Cloud platform, the requirements to maintain our FedRAMP compliance became much more stringent. In April, the GDPR deadline was also nearing. Executing on hundreds of FedRAMP- and GDPR-related tasks emerged as another critical priority for many of our product and engineering teams. I'm proud that the team succeeded in accomplishing this amid all the other changes we were making.
Customer experience first

Over the years, I've felt Acquia lacked a focus on user experience (UX) for both developers and marketers. As a result, increasing the capacity of our R&D team included doubling the size of the UX team.

We've stepped up our UX research to better understand the needs and challenges of those who use Acquia products. We've begun to employ design-first methodologies, such as design sprints and a lean-UX approach. We've also created roles for customer experience designers, so that we're looking at the full customer journey rather than just our product interfaces.

With the extra capacity and data-driven changes in place, we've been working hard on updating the user experience for the entire Acquia Experience Platform. For example, you can see a preview of our new Acquia Lift product in this video, which has an increased focus on UX:

Drupal

In 2018, Drupal 8 adoption kept growing and Drupal also saw an increase in the number of community contributions and contributors, both from individuals and from organizations.

Acquia remains very committed to Drupal, and was the largest contributor to the project in 2018. We now have more than 15 employees who contribute to Drupal full time, in addition to many others that contribute periodically. In 2018, the Drupal team's main areas of focus have been Layout Builder and the API-first initiative:

Layout Builder: Layout Builder offers content authors an easy-to-use page building experience. It's shaping up to be one of the most useful and pervasive features ever added to Drupal because it redefines the how editors control the appearance of their content without having to rely on a developer.
API First: This initiative has given Drupal a true best-in-class web services API for using Drupal as a headless content management system. Headless Drupal is one of the fastest growing segments of Drupal implementations.
Our R&D team gathered in Boston for our annual Build Week in June 2018.Content and Commerce

Adobe's acquisition of Magento has been very positive for us; we're now the largest commerce-agnostic content management company to partner with. As a result, we decided to extend our investments in headless commerce and set up partnerships with Elastic Path and BigCommerce. The momentum we've seen from these partnerships in a short amount of time is promising for 2019.

The market continues to move in Acquia's direction

In 2019, I believe Acquia will continue to be positioned for long-term growth. Here are a few reasons why:

The current markets for content and digital experience management continues to grow rapidly, at approximately 20 percent per year.
Digital transformation is top-of-mind for all organizations, and impacts all elements of their business and value chain.
Open source adoption continues to grow at a furious pace and has seen tremendous business success in 2018.
Cloud adoption continues to grow. Unlike most of our CMS competitors, Acquia was born in the cloud.
Drupal and Acquia are leaders in headless and decoupled content management, which is a fast growing segment of our market.
Conversational interfaces and augmented reality continues to grow, and we embraced these channels a few years ago. Acquia Labs, our research and innovation lab, explored how organizations can use conversational UIs to develop beyond-the-browser experiences, like cooking with Alexa, and voice-enabled search for customers like Purina.
Although we hold a leadership position in our market, our relative market share is small. These trends mean that we should have plenty of opportunity to grow in 2019 and beyond.

Thank you

While 2018 was an incredibly busy year, it was also very rewarding. I have a strong sense of gratitude, and admire every Acquian's relentless determination and commitment to improve. As always, none of these results and milestones would be possible without the hard work of the Acquia team, our customers, partners, the Drupal community, and our many friends.

I've always been pretty transparent about our trajectory (e.g. Acquia 2009 roadmap and Acquia 2017 strategy) and will continue to do so in 2019. We have some big plans for 2019, and I'm excited to share them with you. If you want to get notified about what we have in store, you can subscribe to my blog at https://dri.es/subscribe.

Thank you for your support in 2018!


Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Acquia Engage 2018 keynote

Acquia Engage attendees that arrived at the Austin airport were greeted by an Acquia banner!
Last week, Acquia welcomed more than 600 attendees to the fifth annual Acquia Engage Conference in Austin, Texas. During my keynote, my team and I talked about Acquia's strategy, recent product developments, and our product roadmap. I also had the opportunity to invite three of our customers on stage — Paychex, NBC Sports, and Wendy's — to hear how each organization is leveraging the Acquia Platform.

All three organizations demonstrate incredible use cases, and I invite you to watch the recording of the Innovation Showcase (78 minutes) or download a copy of my slides (219 MB).

I also plan to share more in-depth blog posts on my conversations with Wendy’s, NBC Sports, and Paychex’s next week.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Pixeldust one of ABJ 2009 Top Web Designers

Pixeldust Interactive was listed in the Austin Business Journal's annual list of top DrupalCoin Blockchain Web Design firms in Austin for the third year in a row. This year Pixeldust moved up from number 18 to number 12. The list is determined by a number of factors including gross revenue, clients and number of local employees. Read more


Cielo Wind Power

Pixeldust completed a comprehensive redesign of the existing Cielo Wind Power site, including a look and feel overhaul, content management implementation, copywriting, and video editing and implementation. Pixeldust designed and developed an easy-to-use WordPress-based site to allow for regular photo and content updates. Cielo's new earthy look and feel ultimately accentuates their sustainable and environmentally-conscious approach to energy production.Read more


Backend Developer position is open

Austin, TX, United States
Source: https://jobs.drupal.org/all-jobs/feed


Junior Back-end Developer - Feniex Industries Inc - Austin, TX

Working knowledge of CMS framework such as DrupalCoin Blockchain, WordPress, Yii, etc. This is an in house position for a junior or senior back-end developer.... $50,000 - $65,000 a year
From Indeed - Tue, 03 Oct 2017 23:55:53 GMT - View all Austin, TX jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer


Junior Backend Web Developer - Feniex Industries Inc - Austin, TX

Working knowledge of CMS framework such as DrupalCoin Blockchain, WordPress, Yii, etc. Open source CMS platforms such as DrupalCoin Blockchain or WordPress are fine to use where appropriate.... $50,000 - $65,000 a year
From Indeed - Wed, 27 Sep 2017 16:48:43 GMT - View all Austin, TX jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer


Web Developer - Blackbaud - Austin, TX

Familiarity with Sitefinity content management system and various open content management systems (WordPress, DrupalCoin Blockchain)....
From Blackbaud - Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:09:55 GMT - View all Austin, TX jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer


The Top 5 Career Regrets (and How I’ve Experienced All of Them Already)

Here are the top five career regrets via a Harvard Business Review study and how I’ve experienced all five in my short career already:

I wish I hadn’t taken the job for the money.
I wish I had quit earlier.
I wish I had the confidence to start my own business.
I wish I had used my time at school more productively.
I wish I had acted on my career hunches.

I can empathize with every single one of these. And, I wonder what numbers 6-10 were (and some of the other hits on the list).
Regret can be a powerful motivator [PDF Study] and a helpful emotion to have, if used wisely. But otherwise, it can be a total waste of time.
In many ways I feel like I’m too young to have experienced all of these already but I have. I’m not sure that’s a good or bad thing, but, the study’s results were based on interviews of folks ages 28 to 58. Just let that sink in for a moment, especially if you’re < 28 years old. Now’s the obvious time to start avoiding these things.
After I got my career (and life) back on track after having been fired from my first two jobs out of college I had the opportunity to be a part-time pastor at a small korean church in Austin, TX.
I had no business saying “Yes” to that job because I had a great full-time job that more than made up for the previous failures and my wife even told me not to take it. But, to make a long story very short, I accepted the role, fooled myself, and almost got in a fist-fight with the senior pastor.
I had taken the job for a number of reasons but one of the larger ones was that I felt cash-strapped because of the previous job letdowns. I needed the money but that was a terrible way to do it. Regret numero uno.
A little bit later I started a new role as a technology leader in a non-profit. I stayed there for 2 years and 19 days, about a year longer than I should have.
I knew I should have and could have left but I stayed put because I was insecure with myself and was trying to build my career in a direction that was, in hindsight, the completely wrong direction. Regret numero dos.
This regret nicely aligns with number three as well as it took me a long time, much longer than people imagine, for me to really start my own business. I had built a number of projects but I was far too scared to go out on my own.
Entrepreneurship, as I have told many people, was much more of an accidental thing than anything else. And, if I were to do my career and life any other way I’d do something different than be a founder of companies. It’s really, really, really hard.
For number 4 this is also easy to spot as I failed out of my computer science degree at Georgia Tech and squandered a number of fantastic opportunities to grow my comp-sci literacy. Instead, I was arrogant and foolish with my time and I played way too many video games. I could have used those four years in much better ways.
And, finally, there are countless times in my short-ish career history where I had a hunch about an opportunity, a person, an idea that I decided to punt for whatever reason. Many of them ended up to be true.
I try not to punt as often now but I still have enough scar tissue to warrant patience. This is hard though and I’m not amazing at understanding or deciphering the best angle and approach.
So… how about you?
The post The Top 5 Career Regrets (and How I’ve Experienced All of Them Already) appeared first on John Saddington.
Source: https://john.do/


Director, Web Marketing - Forcepoint - Austin, TX

Manage a small team of web and analytics professionals, including a DrupalCoin Blockchain developer; Understanding of Web technology and tools, for example Adobe Analytics and...
From Forcepoint - Mon, 10 Jul 2017 06:07:15 GMT - View all Austin, TX jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer


If You’re Inlining SVG Icons, How Do You Deal With Unique Titles and IDs?

Just inlining SVG seems to be the easiest and most flexible icon system. But that chunk of <svg> might have a <title>, and you might be appying IDs to both of those elements for various reasons.

One of those reasons might be because you just want an ID on the icon to uniquely identify it for JavaScript or styling purposes.
Another of those reasons is that for accessibility, it's recommended you use aria-labelledby to connect the id and title, like:
<!-- aria-labelledby pointing to ID's of title and desc because some browsers incorrectly don't use them unless we do -->
<svg role="img" viewBox="0 0 100 100" aria-labelledby="unique-title-id unique-desc-id">

<!-- title becomes the tooltip as well as what is read to assistive technology -->
<!-- must be the first child! -->
<title id="unique-title-id">Short Title (e.g. Add to Cart)</title>

<!-- longer description if needed -->
<desc id="unique-desc-id">A friendly looking cartoon cart icon with blinking eyes.</desc>

<!-- all the SVG drawing stuff -->
<path d="..." />
</svg>
But now you include that SVG somewhere twice. Say you're in Rails...
<%= render "/icons/icon.svg.erb" %>

<p>yadda yadda yadda</p>

<%= render "/icons/icon.svg.erb" %>
Now you'll have two elements on the page with the exact same ID, which is... bad?
It's definitely bad if you're relying on that ID for anything JavaScript related, because JavaScript will only find the first one and that might be confusing and weird.
I'm not entirely sure if it's bad for accessibility. Perhaps someone else can weigh in there. Assuming the titles are the same, my guess is that it won't matter much.
It's bad for HTML semantics, I suppose, but I'm always kinda meh on that if there are no repercussions.
If you're really interested in fixing this issue, my go-to would be to pass in the ID's to be used manually.
Again if you were in Rails, you could pass locals:
<%=
render(
partial: "parts/modules/search",
locals: {
svg_id: "my-icon",
title_id: "my-icon-title",
desc_id: "my-icon-desc"
}
)
%>
And then design the icons to use those locals, like
<svg title="<%= svg_id %> aria-labelledby="<%= title_id %>" ... >

<title id="<%= title_id %>>

...

</svg>
You could port that concept to any language. A React app could have:
<SVGIcon svg_id="..." title_id="..." />
A PHP app could set variables before an include:
$svg_id = "...";
$title_id = "...";
include("/icons/icon.svg.php");
Now it's just on you to manage IDs to make them unique like we've always done with IDs.
This little post was inspired by Austin Wolf, who had this problem and thought through some solutions. This also included auto-generating unique IDs:
<svg aria-labelledby="star-6c84fb90-12c4-11e1-840d-7b25c5ee775a">
<title id="star-6c84fb90-12c4-11e1-840d-7b25c5ee775a">star icon</title>
// ...
</svg>
That also seems like a good solution to me.
I'd be interested to hear more thoughts!

If You’re Inlining SVG Icons, How Do You Deal With Unique Titles and IDs? is a post from CSS-Tricks
Source: CssTricks


Web Lead & Digital Strategist - IBM - Austin, TX

Experience working in environments with Agile, Design, DrupalCoin Blockchain, HTML, UX, UI, Events. Manage designers, developers, writers and agency relations to outline...
From IBM - Thu, 18 May 2017 20:40:41 GMT - View all Austin, TX jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer


Web Developer - GateHouse Media, Inc - Austin, TX

The web developer role is responsible for designing, coding, modifying and maintaining all Gatehouse-owned newspaper websites....
From GateHouse Media, Inc - Thu, 18 May 2017 03:45:38 GMT - View all Austin, TX jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer


UI and Web Services Developer - Astor & Sanders Corp - Austin, TX

UI and Web Services Developer. Systems Integration &amp; Development Inc., an award winning IT solutions provider, is currently seeking a UI and Web Services...
From Astor & Sanders Corp - Sat, 06 May 2017 10:14:07 GMT - View all Austin jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer