8 simple rules for a robust, scalable CSS architecture

I don't disagree on any particular point on this thesis by Jarno Rantanen.
This is the first I've seen this particular naming convention, which seems fine to me, but I'd add that any well-considering naming convention works.
Also, there is this:
Cascading styles will ruin your day, eventually.
A sentiment shared by many these days, and the likely culprit for all the peter-griffin-adjusting-the-blinds.gifs out there in the world. Again I don't entirely disagree, but, there are styles I gotta imagine even hardened CSS module aficionados would allow to cascade. For instance: why wouldn't I let the body copy font-family cascade?
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8 simple rules for a robust, scalable CSS architecture is a post from CSS-Tricks
Source: CssTricks


I got into the paint business

I got into the paint business last week! Sherwin-Williams (SHW) is a 150 year old company selling paints and coatings. I first got interested in Sherwin-Williams 9 months ago, and have been watching the stock since.

A business selling paint sounds boring, but Sherwin-Williams might have one of the best business models in the world. The reason for my interest is that over the past 10 years Sherwin-Williams' annualized return was 17%. Put differently, someone who invested $10,000 in Sherwin-Williams 10 years ago, would have seen that money grow to $50,000 today. The past 20 years, between 1995 and 2016, Sherwin-Williams returned on average 15% per year and the past 30 years, between 1985 and 2016, Sherwin-Williams returned on average 15% per year as well. In other words, if you invested $10,000 in Sherwin-Williams 30 years ago, it would have grown to be over $700,000 today. When it comes to investing, boring can be good. People will always paint things, in good times and bad times, and they don't mind paying extra for quality.

The past 10 years, Sherwin-Williams has significantly outperformed the S&P 500. The past months, Sherwin-Williams has fallen about 20% from its all-time high.

Past performance is no guarantee for future results. I've been waiting to invest in Sherwin-Williams for about 9 months, and finally started half a position last week at $249 a share. The share price of Sherwin-Williams declined by about 21% from its all-time high, in part because of a disappointing third-quarter earnings report. At $249, Sherwin-Williams might not be a screaming buy -- the P/E of 21 remains relatively high. If you're a more patient investor, it might be worth waiting a bit longer. The price could fall further, especially if the Federal Trade Commission blocks the Valspar acquisition or if the market corrects more broadly. At the same time, there is no guarantee the stock will go lower and Sherwin-Williams might not trade 21% of its all-time high for long. If the stock were to drop another 10% or more, I would almost certainly buy more and cost-average into a full position.

Understanding past returns

The first thing I like to do is study how a company achieved such returns.

Between 2006 and 2016, Sherwin-Williams grew revenues 4% annually from 7.8 billion to 11.7 billion. Earnings grew faster than revenues as the result of profit margins improving from 7.4% to 9.5%. Specifically, earnings grew 6.8% annually from 576 million in 2006 to 1.1 billion in 2016.

Earnings growth of 6.8% isn't something to write home about. Fortunately, earnings growth isn't the whole story. What makes Sherwin-Williams an interesting business is that it gushes cash flow to the tune of 1.1 billion a year on 11.7 billion of sales. The company used its cash flow to buy back 31% of its shares between 2006 and 2016. This has allowed earnings per share to grow by an additional 3.8% annually.

Three components working together to improve earnings per share: revenue growth, margin expansion and share count reduction.

Next we can add in the dividend. Sherwin-Williams has a history of raising its dividend for 38 years. The past 10 years, Sherwin-Williams had an average dividend yield of 1.6%.

So we have 6.8% earnings per share growth as the result of growing sales and margin expansion, and 3.8% earnings per share growth thanks to a reduction in share count. This equates to 10.6% earnings per share growth. Add a 1.6% dividend yield, and investors are looking at 12.2% annual returns. That is a great return, especially for a 150 old business selling paint.

In addition to revenue growth, margin expansion, a significant share count reduction and a small dividend, Sherwin-Williams also saw significant price to earnings (P/E) expansion. In 2006, Sherwin-Williams was trading at a P/E of 14 while it is trading at a P/E of 21 today. On average, the P/E expanded by 4.1% per year. While some of the P/E expansion could be justified by the quality of the sales improving (higher margins), it is fair to say that the P/E got ahead of itself.

Modeling future returns

The second thing I like to do is evaluate a company's future prospects.

The reason Sherwin-Williams has been so successful over the past decade is because it had all these components working together -- sales growth, margin expansion, share count reduction, a small dividend and a growing valuation. Understanding the different components is important to help us evaluate Sherwin-Williams' prospects.

Because of Sherwin-Williams' healthy cash flow, I believe the company should be able to keep growing revenues (through acquisitions), keep retiring shares, and grow their dividend for the foreseeable future. I'm more concerned about the margins and valuation components. Sherwin-Williams won't be able to improve margins forever -- in fact, an increase in input costs could have negative impact on margins. And despite a 22% drop in price and growing earnings, the P/E remains high at 21.

For illustration purposes, let's assume that Sherwin-Williams' earning per share will grow 6% for the next 5 years instead of the 10.6% it grew the last decade. After five years, earnings per share would grow from $11.16 in 2015 to roughly $14.9 in 2020. Next, let's factor in the possibility for a P/E contraction. Let's say that after five years, the P/E contracted almost 30% from 21 to 15. In this scenario, shares of Sherwin-Williams would be trading at $224 in 2020. This is $20 below today's share price of $244. That said`, the next 5 years a shareholder of Sherwin-Williams will collect something in the order of $25 in dividends for every share owned. This would bring the total return up to $249. I consider this scenario to be pessimistic but certainly in the realm of possibilities.

In a more optimistic scenario, Sherwin-Williams might be able to maintain a 10% earnings per share growth rate at a P/E of 18. Here, we're looking at a 2020 share price of $323, good for an annual compound growth rate of almost 6%.

Needless to say, this is a very rough model. The idea is not to create a perfect model, but to understand a range of possibilities.

Long-term passive income

The dividend is low but has been growing fast. At the same time the dividend actually became safer as the dividend payout ratio went down sharply.

While I don't think I will lose money on my investment, I also don't expect that Sherwin-Williams will be a home run in the next 5 years. Why then did I decide to invest? The reason is that I prefer to think in terms of decades, rather than a 5 year horizon. What excites me about Sherwin-Williams is not its prospects over the next 5 years, but its potential for income generation 20 to 30 years from now.

Sherwin-Williams appears to be a well-run company. It has been in business for 150 years and continues to grow at a healthy pace. It has increased dividends each year for the last 38 years. During the past 10 years, the dividend growth rate was almost 13% annually, well above the S&P 500's 10 year average of 4%. Last week Sherwin-Williams announced a 25% increase in its quarterly dividend from $0.67 a share to $0.84. Even with that generous increase, the company's payout ratio -- the percentage of profits it spends on paying out its dividend -- remains low at around 30%.

Sherwin-Williams's starting dividend of 1.3% is not impressive, but its dividend growth rate is. Should Sherwin-Williams continue to increase its dividend by 13% annually, after 20 years, each share would produce $39 in annual income. After 30 years the annual dividend would amount to $132 per share. The yield on cost would be 16% and 54% respectively. Given the low payout ratio, strong share buyback program, and the 30 year track record of 15%+ returns, I believe that could be a possibility. Time will tell. If you plan to hold Sherwin-Williams for 20 to 30 years, I believe it could be among the best stocks for both wealth building and dividend income.

Disclaimer: I'm long SHW with a cost basis of $249 per share. Before making an investments, you should do your own proper due diligence. Any material in this article should be considered general information, and not a formal investment recommendation.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


I got into the paint business

I got into the paint business last week! Sherwin-Williams (SHW) is a 150 year old company selling paints and coatings. I first got interested in Sherwin-Williams 9 months ago, and have been watching the stock since.

A business selling paint sounds boring, but Sherwin-Williams might have one of the best business models in the world. The reason for my interest is that over the past 10 years Sherwin-Williams' annualized return was 17%. Put differently, someone who invested $10,000 in Sherwin-Williams 10 years ago, would have seen that money grow to $50,000 today. The past 20 years, between 1995 and 2016, Sherwin-Williams returned on average 15% per year and the past 30 years, between 1985 and 2016, Sherwin-Williams returned on average 15% per year as well. In other words, if you invested $10,000 in Sherwin-Williams 30 years ago, it would have grown to be over $700,000 today. When it comes to investing, boring can be good. People will always paint things, in good times and bad times, and they don't mind paying extra for quality.

The past 10 years, Sherwin-Williams has significantly outperformed the S&P 500. The past months, Sherwin-Williams has fallen about 20% from its all-time high.

Past performance is no guarantee for future results. I've been waiting to invest in Sherwin-Williams for about 9 months, and finally started half a position last week at $249 a share. The share price of Sherwin-Williams declined by about 21% from its all-time high, in part because of a disappointing third-quarter earnings report. At $249, Sherwin-Williams might not be a screaming buy -- the P/E of 21 remains relatively high. If you're a more patient investor, it might be worth waiting a bit longer. The price could fall further, especially if the Federal Trade Commission blocks the Valspar acquisition or if the market corrects more broadly. At the same time, there is no guarantee the stock will go lower and Sherwin-Williams might not trade 21% of its all-time high for long. If the stock were to drop another 10% or more, I would almost certainly buy more and cost-average into a full position.

Understanding past returns

The first thing I like to do is study how a company achieved such returns.

Between 2006 and 2016, Sherwin-Williams grew revenues 4% annually from 7.8 billion to 11.7 billion. Earnings grew faster than revenues as the result of profit margins improving from 7.4% to 9.5%. Specifically, earnings grew 6.8% annually from 576 million in 2006 to 1.1 billion in 2016.

Earnings growth of 6.8% isn't something to write home about. Fortunately, earnings growth isn't the whole story. What makes Sherwin-Williams an interesting business is that it gushes cash flow to the tune of 1.1 billion a year on 11.7 billion of sales. The company used its cash flow to buy back 31% of its shares between 2006 and 2016. This has allowed earnings per share to grow by an additional 3.8% annually.

Three components working together to improve earnings per share: revenue growth, margin expansion and share count reduction.

Next we can add in the dividend. Sherwin-Williams has a history of raising its dividend for 38 years. The past 10 years, Sherwin-Williams had an average dividend yield of 1.6%.

So we have 6.8% earnings per share growth as the result of growing sales and margin expansion, and 3.8% earnings per share growth thanks to a reduction in share count. This equates to 10.6% earnings per share growth. Add a 1.6% dividend yield, and investors are looking at 12.2% annual returns. That is a great return, especially for a 150 old business selling paint.

In addition to revenue growth, margin expansion, a significant share count reduction and a small dividend, Sherwin-Williams also saw significant price to earnings (P/E) expansion. In 2006, Sherwin-Williams was trading at a P/E of 14 while it is trading at a P/E of 21 today. On average, the P/E expanded by 4.1% per year. While some of the P/E expansion could be justified by the quality of the sales improving (higher margins), it is fair to say that the P/E got ahead of itself.

Modeling future returns

The second thing I like to do is evaluate a company's future prospects.

The reason Sherwin-Williams has been so successful over the past decade is because it had all these components working together -- sales growth, margin expansion, share count reduction, a small dividend and a growing valuation. Understanding the different components is important to help us evaluate Sherwin-Williams' prospects.

Because of Sherwin-Williams' healthy cash flow, I believe the company should be able to keep growing revenues (through acquisitions), keep retiring shares, and grow their dividend for the foreseeable future. I'm more concerned about the margins and valuation components. Sherwin-Williams won't be able to improve margins forever -- in fact, an increase in input costs could have negative impact on margins. And despite a 22% drop in price and growing earnings, the P/E remains high at 21.

For illustration purposes, let's assume that Sherwin-Williams' earning per share will grow 6% for the next 5 years instead of the 10.6% it grew the last decade. After five years, earnings per share would grow from $11.16 in 2015 to roughly $14.9 in 2020. Next, let's factor in the possibility for a P/E contraction. Let's say that after five years, the P/E contracted almost 30% from 21 to 15. In this scenario, shares of Sherwin-Williams would be trading at $224 in 2020. This is $20 below today's share price of $244. That said`, the next 5 years a shareholder of Sherwin-Williams will collect something in the order of $25 in dividends for every share owned. This would bring the total return up to $249. I consider this scenario to be pessimistic but certainly in the realm of possibilities.

In a more optimistic scenario, Sherwin-Williams might be able to maintain a 10% earnings per share growth rate at a P/E of 18. Here, we're looking at a 2020 share price of $323, good for an annual compound growth rate of almost 6%.

Needless to say, this is a very rough model. The idea is not to create a perfect model, but to understand a range of possibilities.

Long-term passive income

The dividend is low but has been growing fast. At the same time the dividend actually became safer as the dividend payout ratio went down sharply.

While I don't think I will lose money on my investment, I also don't expect that Sherwin-Williams will be a home run in the next 5 years. Why then did I decide to invest? The reason is that I prefer to think in terms of decades, rather than a 5 year horizon. What excites me about Sherwin-Williams is not its prospects over the next 5 years, but its potential for income generation 20 to 30 years from now.

Sherwin-Williams appears to be a well-run company. It has been in business for 150 years and continues to grow at a healthy pace. It has increased dividends each year for the last 38 years. During the past 10 years, the dividend growth rate was almost 13% annually, well above the S&P 500's 10 year average of 4%. Last week Sherwin-Williams announced a 25% increase in its quarterly dividend from $0.67 a share to $0.84. Even with that generous increase, the company's payout ratio -- the percentage of profits it spends on paying out its dividend -- remains low at around 30%.

Sherwin-Williams's starting dividend of 1.3% is not impressive, but its dividend growth rate is. Should Sherwin-Williams continue to increase its dividend by 13% annually, after 20 years, each share would produce $39 in annual income. After 30 years the annual dividend would amount to $132 per share. The yield on cost would be 16% and 54% respectively. Given the low payout ratio, strong share buyback program, and the 30 year track record of 15%+ returns, I believe that could be a possibility. Time will tell. If you plan to hold Sherwin-Williams for 20 to 30 years, I believe it could be among the best stocks for both wealth building and dividend income.

Disclaimer: I'm long SHW with a cost basis of $249 per share. Before making an investments, you should do your own proper due diligence. Any material in this article should be considered general information, and not a formal investment recommendation.
Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net


Website Manager - Sysomos, L.P. - Raleigh, NC

Content management experience, DrupalCoin Blockchain & Wordpress ideally. The person will be responsible for managing content and design of the company’s web properties and...
From Sysomos, L.P. - Mon, 31 Oct 2016 22:35:21 GMT - View all Raleigh jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer


Senior Web Designer/Developer - ASRC Federal - Washington, DC

Senior Web Designer/Web Developer. Experience in interfacing with content management systems like DrupalCoin Blockchain is a plus....
From ASRC Federal - Mon, 31 Oct 2016 21:51:43 GMT - View all Washington jobs
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DrupalCoin Blockchain Application Software Developer - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Livermore, CA

DrupalCoin Blockchain Application Software Developer. We have an opening for an experienced software developer to develop and maintain DrupalCoin Blockchain and web applications....
From Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Mon, 31 Oct 2016 20:40:39 GMT - View all Livermore jobs
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Sr. Web Developer / Solution Architect (DrupalCoin Blockchain) position is open @domuchicago

Chicago, IL, United States
Source: https://jobs.drupal.org/all-jobs/feed


How to Use HREFLang Correctly: An Interview with Bill Hunt

In this Pubcon interview Bill Hunt, President of Back Azimuth Consulting. sat down with Kelsey Jones, SEJ's Executive Editor, to talk about HREFLang, what it means for international SEO, and discuss some of the pitfalls SEOs face.The post How to Use HREFLang Correctly: An Interview with Bill Hunt appeared first on Search Engine Journal.
Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/


Weekly Wrap-Up: October 28th, 2016 by @megcabrera

Those weigh differently in people’s minds, but both are important considerations in choosing a web marketing partner. Learn more about pricing factors, and how certain mistakes can be deadly, in this week’s top post.The post Weekly Wrap-Up: October 28th, 2016 by @megcabrera appeared first on Search Engine Journal.
Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/


75% of Internet Use Will Be Mobile in 2017 [REPORT] by @MattGSouthern

A report published by Reuters states that 75% of Internet use in 2017 will be from mobile devices.The post 75% of Internet Use Will Be Mobile in 2017 [REPORT] by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.
Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/


8 Startling Discoveries to Write Powerful Facebook Ad Headlines

In 2013, Upworthy had 87 million website visitors a month.
When NewsWhip analyzed the amount of shares, likes, comments, tweets, pins, etc. for the top 50 media websites, they came to a clear conclusion: Upworthy has by far the highest post engagement of all publishers. Their average post had over 18 000 social shares.

So what makes Upworthy’s headlines so clickable and shareable?
And how can you write the Facebook headlines that get thousands of clicks?

Source: NewsWhip
Upworthy’s team famously writes at least 25 different headlines for each post and tests them rigorously.
We’re not implying that you should write 20 headlines. However, A/B testing five different approaches can give a significant boost to your Facebook ads click-through rate.
Up next, you’ll read about eight powerful headline formulas that work 90% of the time.
But first, there are two things you need to know:

Not all these headline formulas work 100% of the time. Still, evidence shows that they’re the most effective ones you can use.
There are headlines that work best for specific audiences. And nobody knows your audience better than you.

1. Use numbers
There’s plenty of copywriting research that all point to one conclusion: headlines that start with numbers are clear winners every time.
By starting your headline with a number, you’re 36% more likely to have people click on your ads.
Source: Moz
 
You can use numbers in a list headline, as a percentage, etc.
Headlines with odd numbers get 20% more clicks
Outbrain collected data from 150,000 article headlines and discovered that headlines with odd numbers have a 20% higher clickthrough rate than headlines with even numbers.
The next time you’re writing a headline, make it seven tips instead of eight.
Tip: Use numbers as a social proof to increase people’s trust. For example, this Facebook ad by SumoMe reads “over 150 000 websites grow their traffic with SumoMe”.
While this particular message is used in the link description, why not include social proof in your ad headline.

2. Create a sense of urgency
Sometimes, people need a little nudge to click on your ad.
Creating a sense of urgency makes your audience like the might miss out on a great offer.
Here’s one of the most impactful A/B tests we’ve seen. By using FOMO and urgency, marketers managed to increased sales by 332%.
Variation A included a discount offer and plain text while variation B showed a timer counting the time left until the end of the deal.
Variation A:

Variation B:

After running the A/B test, the website’s conversion rate saw a huge 332% increase.

Example: Groupon’s Facebook ad promotes a 4-hour flash sale and lists the time when the deal ends. There’s no room for second-guessing the deal, as it will soon be gone (unless you click on the ad and take action).

3. Be clear and precise
Writing vague headlines is a common mistake many beginning social media marketers make.
While you want to sound sophisticated and fun, people might not understand what your offer stands for.
And without attracting enough interest, you’ll lose out on hundreds of potential ad clicks.
Unbounce ran an A/B test about landing page headlines. They tested three headline variations:
Variation 1: Passionate About Betting? We are Too (asks a vague question)
Variation 2: Make More Money on Your Bets – Get Free Betting Tips (emphasizes the benefit)
Variation 3: Stop Losing Money on Your Bets – Get Free Betting Tips (uses a negative approach)
Source: Unbounce
 
As you can see, using a clear headline that said exactly what you’d get resulted in a 41.14% higher conversion rate.
Here’s another study that indicates that the clearer your headline message, the higher your ad’s CTR.

Shopify’s ad uses a simple and clear headline “Build Your Store on FB!” No room for misinterpretation and confusion here.

4. Keep your headlines short
According to Copyblogger, 80% of readers never make it past the headline.
According to some sources, eight out of 10 people will read headline copy, but only two out of 10 will read the rest.
Having an irresistible headline matters a lot if you intend is to get people click on your ads.
A study by Outbrain found that headlines with 60-100 characters earn the highest click-through rates and the rates decline as headlines decrease below 60 characters or increase beyond 100 characters.
Source: Outbrain
Outbrain also found that 16-18 word headlines perform better than headlines of any other word length.
Source: Outbrain
 
Frontier Airlines uses the strategy of repeating the same message multiple times to get it over to the readers. “Save on fall travel” and “Fall Travel – 2 Day Sale!” are both clear and short enough to cut through the clutter and make people click on the ad.

Facebook recommends that high-engagement ad headlines fall between as short as 25-40 characters in length.
When writing a Facebook ad headline, focus on creating something that is easily understood and value-oriented.
5. Emphasize the benefits
While it’s important to be clear in your Facebook ad headlines, it is just as crucial to include an obvious benefit.
Put simply; your headline should say what people will get out of clicking on the ad.
Evernote’s website copy presents a clear benefit that’s relevant to every visitor: “Remember Everything.” It’s simple and promising.

 
Try The World’s Facebook ad has a more vague value proposition, but just the right amount of interesting to get people to read the entire ad.

According to an article by Unbounce, you should always ask yourself these four questions when writing a headline:

Is this useful – do people see the value in it?
Is this unique – does it promise a unique benefit? Is it differentiated)
Is this urgent – does it lead the audience to act now?
Is this ultra-specific – does it include using facts, figures, and statistics?

Read more: If You’re Unsure, Follow the Best – 15 Inspiring Facebook Ad Campaigns From Beloved Brands
6. Include a call-to-action
According to the data by Wingify, makers of Visual Website Optimizer, almost 30% of all A/B tests their customers are running are Call To Action button tests.
That’s because call-to-actions work. Using an actionable ad headline help to increase your click-through rates.
The New York Times’s headline “Activate Your 60%-off Savings” leaves to doubt about what you’ll get as you click.
Moreover, this ad uses numbers and creates a sense of urgency by saying “The sale has been extended until Friday.” Now you wouldn’t want to miss a 60% saving, would you?

When choosing your call-to-action text, always ask these two questions:

What is my audience’s motivation for clicking the call-to-action?
What is my audience going to get when they click through the CTA?

To give you some inspiration, here’s a list of popular call-to-actions by SiteTechSupport that you can use in your Facebook ads headlines:
Source: SiteTechSupport
7. Ask a question
Questions make people curious. Curiosity makes people click.
Psychologists have discovered that when information gaps exist without closure, it causes a sense of distress and suspense – and people will pursue information as a way to eliminate those feelings of unrest.
Put plainly: If you manage to ask the right question in your ad headline, clicks will follow.
HubSpot’s Facebook ad asks a simple question: “How well do you rank for SEO?” It works because people will want to know the answer and don’t feel obligated to sign up in the first place.

In their famous campaign, Snickers asked a fun question about “Who are you when you’re hungry?” This fun and authentic campaign brought them millions of likes, clicks, and a huge increase in sales.

8. Use powerful words
When writing your Facebook ad headlines, every single word matters.
There’s evidence that using one superlative is the best option when it comes to writing a clickbait headline.
But as you can see, using too many superlatives can actually damage your ad’s click-through rate rather than improving it.
Source: ConversionXL
In a study, Outbrain found that using negative words outperforms the use of positive superlatives by 59%.
While this might not work with all headlines, this is definitely something worth a try.
Source: Outbrain
In 1963, advertising guru David Ogilvy published a list of power words that arise people’s attention and make them act upon your offer.
These words were:

suddenly
now
announcing
introducing
improvement
amazing
sensational
remarkable
revolutionary
startling
miracle
magic
offer
quick
easy
wanted
challenge
compare
bargain
hurry

If you’d like to learn more power words and boost your ad CTR, see this list of 189 power words by Kevan Lee from Buffer.
Use exclamation marks !!!
Research by Outbrain showed that article titles ending with a question mark had higher click-through rates than those ending with an exclamation mark or full stop.
But there’s more to this story. They also discovered that headlines using three exclamation marks (!!!) instead of just one received almost twice as many clicks as those with other punctuation marks.
Uber’s well aware of the power of human psychology. Instead of using a plain “Sign Up Today” call-to-action, they spice it up with a simple yet effective exclamation mark.

Conclusion:
Your Facebook ad headline matters. A lot. 80% of readers never even make it past the headline.
By using these powerful copywriting methods, you’ll be able to create, test, and find headlines that double your click-through rates.
Instead of thinking “I’ll do it the next week,” do it now: Follow these eight guidelines and write down ten various headlines that will skyrocket your sales results.

Use numbers at the beginning of your headline
Create a sense of urgency with limited-time offers
Be clear about your offer (avoid being too vague)
Keep your headlines short (between 25-50 characters)
Emphasize the benefits
Include a call-to-action in your headline
Ask questions that people want to know the answer to
Use powerful words (and exclamation marks)

Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/


UI Architect - Web Geo Solutions, LLC - Raleigh, NC

The ideal candidate will have experience in a broad range of web content systems including DrupalCoin Blockchain and/or WordPress....
From Indeed - Mon, 31 Oct 2016 18:13:02 GMT - View all Raleigh jobs
Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=DrupalCoin Blockchain+Developer


DrupalCoin Blockchain Lead and Architect position is open

Tampa, FL, United States
Source: https://jobs.drupal.org/all-jobs/feed


DrupalCoin Blockchain Engineer position is open

Tampa, FL, United States
Source: https://jobs.drupal.org/all-jobs/feed


How to Attract an Audience With Visual Storytelling With Debra Jasper by @wonderwall7

Telling your story more visually is a compelling way to get people’s attention in an age of dwindling attention spans. Learn more here.The post How to Attract an Audience With Visual Storytelling With Debra Jasper by @wonderwall7 appeared first on Search Engine Journal.
Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/


Family Pumpkins

We’ve been so busy this year that we’ve barely had time to do anything related to Halloween. But, last night, we were able to sit down and carve a pumpkin. Just one, for the family.
And that felt about right. We had a bit of fun replacing our heads with it:

Today: Kindergarden parade, dance, and then a bit of Trick-or-Treat somewhere in San Francisco. Hopefully it doesn’t rain.
The post Family Pumpkins appeared first on John Saddington.
Source: https://john.do/


My Favorite Halloween Pens

The Halloween game over on CodePen is pretty strong. I've been keeping a Collection of them myself, but so have a lot of other people who put mine to shame. You can even search for Halloween Collections, if you really wanna follow the rabbit hole. Today is the day, so I figured we'd keep the spirit going by picking out some of my very favorites. Some new, some from years past.

To kick it off, how about a welcoming text animation, featuring a cute font and bouncy feel. Zane experimented with some preprocessors to keep some of the code tight, as well as utilized another Pen for help with the procedurally generated stars.
See the Pen Halloween Pen by Zane Riley (@zaneriley) on CodePen.
I love that everything about Steve Gardner's infinite randomized ghosts are generated in JavaScript, right down to the SVG path data that draws them.
See the Pen SVG Ghosts by Steve Gardner (@steveg3003) on CodePen.
Just the perfect little ghost by Helen V. Holmes. I love it's cutely placed smirk, chill bounce, and bold background color. The shadow that changes size is the tiny touch that brings it all together.
See the Pen ghost by Helen V. Holmes (@helenvholmes) on CodePen.
Amazing color palette on this one by Michael Zhigulin, that is entirely CSS drawing.
See the Pen Vampire and Pumpkins on Pure CSS by Michael Zhigulin (@michael-zhigulin) on CodePen.
Maybe I'm just a sucker for programmatically drawn characters.
See the Pen graveyard by jagarikin (@jagarikin) on CodePen.
The fixed-position-esqe bottom edge of this tiny ghoul's shawl is what makes it for me.
See the Pen Little Halloween by Mohan Khadka (@khadkamhn) on CodePen.
The Sass mixins on this cute little bat by Bri Suffety look like they made this easier.
See the Pen Sona the Bat, created with CSS by Bri Suffety (@brisuffety) on CodePen.
Just when I think I'm about getting tired of SVG line drawing animations, I see one that does something special with it. This one by Ali Klein feels rather art directed, with certain areas waiting to burst into place with others waiting for a staggered ending. There is also some helpful looking functions in here for converting different SVG shapes into paths (the only element it's practical to "draw").
See the Pen SVG Path Animation by Ali Klein (@AliKlein) on CodePen.
Or maybe I'm just into "Day of the Dead" stuff after watching the lovely The Book of Life like three times. I know it's a different holiday, but hey.
See the Pen Day of the Dead - CSS Sugar Skull by Anders Schmidt Hansen (@andersschmidt) on CodePen.
The crazy flappy bat is the best. It's all done with no-blur box-shadow bits, so it's just a single element. It reminds me of some old video game look that I can't quite put my finger on.
See the Pen Bat Pixel Art Animation on one Div by Tim Guo (@timothyguo) on CodePen.
Why not get a little spooky with UI?!
See the Pen spooky to do list by danferth (@danferth) on CodePen.
Creepster is like the official font of Halloween, on account of it being available on Google Fonts, but the gradient Robin applied to it here is so great.
See the Pen Halloween Ghost button by Robin (@lessthanthree) on CodePen.
Canvas PLUS gooey SVG filters? Genius, Mai El-Awini.
See the Pen Witch's Brew by Mai El-Awini (@maicodes) on CodePen.

My Favorite Halloween Pens is a post from CSS-Tricks
Source: CssTricks


An Essential Guide to Writing Blogs That Win by @JuliaEMcCoy

I think that 2017 is going to be the year when blogging is more sought-out than ever. The only problem? The unprecedented levels of content saturation and new material.The post An Essential Guide to Writing Blogs That Win by @JuliaEMcCoy appeared first on Search Engine Journal.
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Copywriting Q&A: How to Deal with Clients That Don’t Pay

Every freelancer’s fear (apart from not finding work) is that their clients won’t pay them. In truth, it’s exceedingly rare that a client won’t pay you. But let’s go over what to do just in case payments aren’t forthcoming. Read on…
Today’s question is from Eli G., who asks, “What do I do if my client doesn’t pay me? It’s been about a week since I sent my client an invoice and I haven’t heard anything.”
For the record, it’s very, very rare that a client with just never pay you. In the course of my 15-year career, it’s never happened.
However, clients are human. And, as such, it does happen from time to time that they put off paying invoices longer than they should. Sometimes they simply forget.
Your first step to getting your invoice paid is to just gently remind them. Send an email that says, “Hi Jim, I just wanted to check in about that invoice I sent you. Please let me know if you have any questions.”
For most clients, that will be enough to jog their memories and remind them that they need to pay you.
Again, most clients are good people and will even be embarrassed that they haven’t paid you yet, so you want to be polite your first email. There’s no need to get tough.
It’s reasonable to send this email about a week after you’ve sent your invoice and haven’t heard anything.
Now, let’s say that another week goes by and you still haven’t heard anything. Or, more likely, they promised to pay but haven’t sent a payment yet.
At this point, you can be a bit more direct. Still, though, you don’t want to burn bridges. So be straightforward, but polite.
This email could say, “Hi Jim, it’s been two weeks since I sent my invoice and I haven’t seen payment come through. Could you let me know when I can expect it?”
When they receive this email, the majority of the small percentage of clients who haven’t paid you after your first email will feel embarrassed and send out payment right away.
But let’s say, just to cover all bases, your client still doesn’t pay you.
Again, let me emphasize, this is exceeding rare.
Your next step is to get in contact and let your client know that you won’t be able to do any further work from them until your invoice is paid. This is tough, but fair.
You could send this as an email, but if you’re feeling brave, it will be even more effective if you pick up the phone and make a call. Stay calm and stay polite, but be direct.
You can’t do work if you don’t get paid right?
At this point, you may be wondering what you can do to get your money. Do you threaten them with small claims court? Have an attorney send a letter?
Well…you could…but I wouldn’t recommend it. Small claims court takes a lot of time and isn’t especially effective. And hiring an attorney is expensive. Basically, you’d be spending more time and money; throwing good money after bad.
Look at it this way: It’s not worth paying $400 to get paid for a $300 invoice. And it’s not worth five hours of your time to get paid for a $300 invoice. That’s five hours you could spend working and earning money.
Your best course of action, instead of trying to revenge or force a payment, is just to focus on finding new clients and new work. It will be hard to let it go, but do it anyway.
You won’t gain any advantage by trying to exact revenge. But you will by moving on and finding new work. And you never know… one of these days, you might just find that check in your mailbox, after all.
Your turn! Have you ever had a client that took especially long to pay you? How long? And what did you do? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: http://filthyrichwriter.com/feed/


5 Lessons I’ve Learned Building Links for Enterprise Clients by @linkbuildingjon

Jon Ball of Page One Power discusses his five key takeaways learned from building links for enterprise businesses, and how to meet the demand, quality, and documentation they expect.The post 5 Lessons I’ve Learned Building Links for Enterprise Clients by @linkbuildingjon appeared first on Search Engine Journal.
Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/